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16 Cards in this Set

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the use of a single word in a highly restricted way
underextension
Speech that includes content words, such as nouns and verbs, but omits the extra words that serve a grammatical function, such as prepositions and articles. Overregulation: applying a general rule to every situation even to ones that are exceptions to the rule. Children learn how to use grammatical morphemes (modifiers that allow language to more specifically and accurately represent what the person really means). Also use negation, as well as ask questions.
Telegraphic Stage
applying a general rule to every situation even to ones that are exceptions to the rule.
Overregulation
modifiers that allow language to more specifically and accurately represent what the person really means
grammatical morphemes
around ages 7 and 8, kids begin to use the syntactic ability of adults. They learn grammatical rules and use personal pronouns and such.
Beginning of complex speech
the ability to use longer and more complex statements.
Semantic Development
reason for gap in understanding and speaking is that the child has trouble producing certain sounds.
Phonological Development
the ability to think and talk about language.
Metalinguistic Skill
a language disorder involving damage to the language centers of the brain
Aphasia
refers to the individual dictionary that each of us uses. It contains all the words we use and the underlying definitions of each.
Lexicon
the ability to communicate thoughts verbally.
Discourse
rules that relate to a specific element, such as rules related to the use of nouns or verbs (ex. Rules governing the use of the verb “ to be”)
Substantive Universals
general rules that relate to linguistic forms (active sentences like “feed the cat”)
Formal Universals
using language as an aid in reasoning. Words that are thought instead of spoken. Usually inner speech is highly abbreviated and consists mostly of predicates rather than subjects. Vygotsky believed that inner speech helps us reason.
Inner Speech
the assumptions that events occurring in sequence are related to one another
Association:
copying or repeating things that are heard. Babbling is more than this and is supported with four pieces of evidence. First of all, babbling included phonemes not present in the language used by people in an infant’s household. Second, we cannot distinguish babbling from babies of different nationalities. Third, some sounds that are common in adult language are present in early babbling, but these sounds are not present in late babbling. Fourth, even deaf babies babble.
Imitation: