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35 Cards in this Set

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Ritornello form-
a Baroque musical form based on reoccurrences of a Ritornello:
Secco recitative-
accompanied only by concerto
Recitative-
a half-singing, half-reciting style of presenting words in opera, oratorio, etc. following speech accents, speech rhythm closely
Aria-
a vocal number for solo singer and orchrestra, generally in opera, cantata, or oratorio
Oratorio-
long semi dramatic piece on a religious subject for soloist, chorus, orchestra
Fugue-
a composition written systematically in imitative polyphony, usually with a single main theme, a fugue subject
Stretto-
short section, at end of fugue, where subject is imitated in close succession
Coda-
the ending section of a fugue
Recapitulation-
restatement of the subject
Subject-
short melody which is the main point of the fugue introduced in the beginning in a single unaccompanied voice
Development-
section of fugue where subject is manipulated, for example (i.e.) change of key sequence imitation, etc
Exposition-
part of a fugue where the subject is exposed
Counterpoint-
is a background complementary music to the main subject in a fugue
Counterpoint-
is a background complementary music to the main subject in a fugue
Accompanied recitative-
accompanied by orchestra
Chorus-
a group of singers singing together with more than 1 person on a voice part
Homophony-
a musical texture that involves only one melody of real interest, combined with chords or other secondary sounds
Baroque sacred music placed special emphasis on the
choir.
Baroque sacred music borrowed from secular music, especially opera. What 3 elements were used?
used recitative & aria also featured virtuoso solo singing.
The most theatrical genre of Baroque vocal music was
Oratorio
Oratorio was most often based on stories from the
Old Testament.
Oratorio used ? characters and ? action.
real;implied
Oratorio differed from opera by using ? form and incorporating many more ?.
concert;choruses
Oratorio was similar to Renaissance choral music because the textures used were ? and ?. It also used word ? just like the Renaissance madrigal.
polyphony;homophony;;painting
To provide maximum fullness in Oratorio, composers used voices and ?.
orchestra
Handel’s most famous work is ?.
Messiah
It took Handel ? days to compose the Messiah.
23
Messiah is unlike any other Handel Oratorio because: the text was taken entirely from the Bible. It uses anonymous ? and ? Narrative episodes from Jesus’ life are depicted by using ?. Comments on these episodes are depicted by using ?,?, and ?
narrators and commentators;recitative;recitative, aria, and chorus
During the recitative, “There were shepherds,” the narrator tells the story in four parts. Part 1 & 3 are ? recitative and parts 2 & 4 are ? recitative.
secco;accompanied
Parts 1 & 3 are conversational style with ? rhythm and ? accompaniment
free;continuo
Parts 2 & 4 are very melodic with clear ? and ? accompaniment
meter;orchestral
The text of “Glory to God” comes from the book of ?, chapter ?, verses ? in the bible.
Luke;2;8-14
In “Glory to God,” the choir takes the role of the ?.
angels
The famous chorus that ends Part II of Messiah is the ?
Hallelujah! Chorus.
At the 1st London performance, King George II was so moved that ?
he stood up at the chorus.