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36 Cards in this Set

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The distnce in pitch between two notes; measured in terms of size and quality`
Interval
The distance in pitch between two notes as determined by their pitch height (position on the musical staff). Measured by taking the number of steps between notes and adding one (C4 to E4 and C4 to Eb4 are both thirds). Accidental disregarded
Interval size
Designation of augmented, diminished, minor, major, perfect or cmpound that describes the distance between two notes based on the interval size and number of semitones (e.g. C4 to E4 is major third; C4 to Eb4 is minor third). Accidentals important part of it.
Interval quality
The distance inpitch between two simultaneously sounding notes. Also known as a vertical interval
Harmonic interval
The distance in pitch between two consecutively sounding notes. Also known as horizontal interval
Melodic interval
Two notes with a pitch distance such that the second note is on the same space or line as the first note (e.g. C4 to C4)
Unison
Two notes with a pitch distance such that the second note is a single diatonic step above or below the first note (e.g. C4 to D4, C4 to B3). space-line or line-space
Second
Two notes with a pitch distance such that the second note is two diatonic steps above/below the first note (e.g. C4 to E4, C4 to A3). space-space or line-line
Third
Two notes with a pitch distance such that the second note is three diatonic steps above/below the first note (C4 to F4, C4 to G3). space-line or line space
Fourth
Two notes with a pitch distanc esuch that the second note is three whole tones - or the enharmonic equivalence of three whole tones - above or below the first note (e.g. C4 to F#4, C4 to Gb3)
Tritone
Two notes with a pitch distance such that the second note is four steps above or below the first note (e.g. C4 to G4, C4 to F3)
Fifth
Two notes with a pitch distance such that the second note is four steps above or below the first note (e.g. C4 to A4, C4 to E3)
Sixth
Two notes with a pitch distance such that the second note is six steps above/below the first note (e.g. C4 to B4, C4 o D4)
Seventh
Any interval smaller than an octave
Simple interval
Any interval larger than an octave
Compound interval
Any interval that appears in the context of a key signature w/o accidentals
Natural interval
For certain natural intervals that can be in one of two sizes (second, third, sixth and seventh), the larger of the two natural intervals
Major interval
For certain natural intervals that can be in one of two sizes (second, third, sixth and seventh), the smaller of the two natural intervals)
Minor interval
Certain natural intervals that have a pure, "consonant" sound (unison, fourth, fifth and octave).
Perfect interval
The compression of minor or perfect inerval size (except the unison) by one chormatic semitone)
Diminshed interval
The expansion of major or perfect interval size by one chromatic semitone.
Augmented interval
Two intervals that contain the same number of semitones but are spelled differently (i.e. with different pitch names)
Enharmonic intervals
The reversal of two notes in an interval such that the top note becomes the bottom and the bottom becomes the top. Can be created by either raising the bottom note by one octave or lowering the top note by one octave
Interval inversion
All pitche intervals that can be made from the pair of pitch classes or transpositions of these pitch classes.
Interval class
A characteristic of a scale by which all possible intervals - allowing for enharmonic equivalents - that are possible w/n the octave can be determined btwn the various scale degrees. For the chromatic scale, there are 12 possible intervals w/n the octave. Each interval can be found at least once in the major scale.
Intervallic completeness
A perceptual quality of harmonic intervals whereby their combined sonority is considered to have a high degree of blend, sound smooth and be relatively stable. Depends on factors, including music stye, context and psychophysics
Consonance
A perceptual quality of harmonic intervals whereby their combined sonority is considered to not blend, sound rough and be relatively unstable.
Dissonance
A frequency range over which acoustic energy is integrated in the ear. Simultaneously sounding tones w/frequency components that fall w/n ______ sound rough and dissonant. This is why a major thir dplayed in the bass range of the piano doesn't sound consonant, especially in comparison to a major third played in the midrange or treble part of the keyboard
Critical bandwidth
Semitone size: 0
PU
Semitone size: 2
M2
Semitone size: 4
M3
Semitone size: 5
P4
Semitone size: 7
P5
Semitone size: 9
M6
Semitone size: 11
M7
Semitone size: 12
P8