Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/120

Click to flip

120 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Family: Asteraceae
Arnica Montana (Arnica, Mountain Arnica, Leopard’s Bane, Wolf’s Bane)
Part Used: Flowers
Arnica Montana (Arnica, Mountain Arnica, Leopard’s Bane, Wolf’s Bane)
It is reserved for topical use only. It is used externally to treat symptoms of injury such as bruises, sprain, strain, sore muscles from overexertion and closed fractures. It also treats hematomas, reduces the pain and inflammation of phlebitis and rheumatic joints. It is specific to treat muscle soreness that has a bruised sensation. It is used in the form of a fomentation or diluted tincture of the flowers to disperse local inflammations and to remove ecchymosis.
Arnica Montana (Arnica, Mountain Arnica, Leopard’s Bane, Wolf’s Bane)
§ Ellingwood considered it specific for "bruised, sore, lacerated and contused muscular structures." In addition he recommends it for the following pathologies: muscular soreness, pain, soreness of the breasts, severe injury, old sores, abscesses.
Arnica Montana (Arnica, Mountain Arnica, Leopard’s Bane, Wolf’s Bane)
§ Homeopath keynotes for prescribing it include sore or bruised sensation, or after a traumatic injury
Arnica Montana (Arnica, Mountain Arnica, Leopard’s Bane, Wolf’s Bane)
Contraindications: Internal use, over broken skin or full-potency long-term use topically, pregnancy.
Arnica Montana (Arnica, Mountain Arnica, Leopard’s Bane, Wolf’s Bane)
Side Effects: Prolonged use can cause skin irritation with pustules and blisters.
Arnica Montana (Arnica, Mountain Arnica, Leopard’s Bane, Wolf’s Bane)
Toxicity: Internal dosing can be toxic and causes gastroenteritis, intoxication, dizziness, tremor, tachycardia and arrhythmia. Ultimately it can lead to liver, kidney and heart damage, coma and death.
Arnica Montana (Arnica, Mountain Arnica, Leopard’s Bane, Wolf’s Bane)
Pharmacy:
Topical Use Only-Poultice, Bath, Tincture, Cream and Ointment as needed for symptoms
Arnica Montana (Arnica, Mountain Arnica, Leopard’s Bane, Wolf’s Bane)
Family: Brassicaceae
Brassica alba, Brassica nigra, Brassica juncea (Mustard)
Part Used: Seeds
Brassica alba, Brassica nigra, Brassica juncea (Mustard)
Taste/Energy: pungent, hot (-K, -V/ +P)
Brassica alba, Brassica nigra, Brassica juncea (Mustard)
diuretic, diaphoretic, carminative
Brassica alba, Brassica nigra, Brassica juncea (Mustard)
It is best known for use topically, causing mild skin irritation and stimulating local circulation. this relieves congestion by increasing circulation to a specific area. It is used in the form of a poultice for external application near the underlying area of inward inflammation, chiefly in pneumonia, bronchitis and other respiratory diseases.
Brassica alba, Brassica nigra, Brassica juncea (Mustard)
§ It is used to treat many conditions including: arthritis, myalgia, fever, influenza, colds, chilblains, bronchitis or pleuritis. It can also be used as a digestive stimulant in small amounts in a similar manner to Capsicum. Hot water poured on bruised seeds makes a stimulating footbath and helps to throw off a cold or resolve a headache.
Brassica alba, Brassica nigra, Brassica juncea (Mustard)
It is a stimulating diaphoretic when taken as a hot tea.
Brassica alba, Brassica nigra, Brassica juncea (Mustard)
Infusion - 1 tsp/cup H2O X 5 minutes, QD to BID
Poultice - 100 grams of seeds (freshly ground) mixed into a paste with warm water. Spread on a thin cotton cloth the size of area to be stimulated. Place a damp layer of cloth between the poultice and the skin. Leave on for 1-10 minutes. Foot Bath - 1 Tablespoon crushed or ground fresh seeds/4 cups water. Steep 5 minutes and add to footbath for 3-5 minutes.
Brassica alba, Brassica nigra, Brassica juncea (Mustard)
Side Effects:
GI distress if used in too high a potency taken internally.
When using as a poultice, the body part should be pink to light red. Care must be taken not to burn or damage the skin. Check the skin for reddening or blistering every 1-2 minutes. Have the patient tell you if the poultice becomes uncomfortable. Remove immediately.
Brassica alba, Brassica nigra, Brassica juncea (Mustard)
Family: Solanaceae
Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum minimum, Capsicum annuum (Cayenne, Red Pepper)
Medicinal Actions:
Antiseptic, carminative, diaphoretic, rubefacient, sialagogue, circulatory stimulant, vasodilator, anti-platelet aggregant, appetite stimulant
Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum minimum, Capsicum annuum (Cayenne, Red Pepper)
Taste/Energy: pungent, heating, drying (-V, -K/ +P)
Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum minimum, Capsicum annuum (Cayenne, Red Pepper)
It is a powerful circulatory stimulant. The eclectic physicians used it to equalize the peripheral and central circulation. It will increase the force of the pulse and bring blood flow to the periphery. It is especially useful for those with chronically cold hands and feet.
Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum minimum, Capsicum annuum (Cayenne, Red Pepper)
It depletes Substance P and thereby reduces pain. Substance P is a pain messenger. The use of it has been shown to cause constant firing of the neurons, depleting the overall level of Substance P and thereby inhibiting the pain response. Many topical creams are available on the marketplace that are standardized to its content and are used to treat arthralgias, cluster headaches, trigeminal neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy and chronic pain. Inflammation will occur with the initial application, but frequent application using a low concentration over time will create an anti-inflammatory response.
Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum minimum, Capsicum annuum (Cayenne, Red Pepper)
It is also a tonic to digestion, so is used to stimulate digestion in hypochlorhydria, dyspepsia, flatulence, and colic.
Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum minimum, Capsicum annuum (Cayenne, Red Pepper)
§ Intranasally it has been shown to be effective for the prevention and treatment of cluster headaches.
Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum minimum, Capsicum annuum (Cayenne, Red Pepper)
It has been shown to decrease histamine release when used regularly over an extended period of time.
Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum minimum, Capsicum annuum (Cayenne, Red Pepper)
it has also been shown to stimulate fibrinolysis and inhibits platelet aggregation and is therefore good for patients prone to clotting.
Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum minimum, Capsicum annuum (Cayenne, Red Pepper)
It is particularly useful in the elderly, when the body-heat is low, vitality depressed, poor circulation and sluggishness. Tired, painful muscles, stiffened joints and relaxation of any part are common conditions in the elderly that are rectified by it.
Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum minimum, Capsicum annuum (Cayenne, Red Pepper)
Contraindications: Not to be used topically over broken skin, HTN.
Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum minimum, Capsicum annuum (Cayenne, Red Pepper)
Drug Interactions: May potentiate Theophylline levels when used concurrently with Capsicum.
Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum minimum, Capsicum annuum (Cayenne, Red Pepper)
Family: Zingiberaceae
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
Part Used: Rhizome
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
polysaccharides (ukonan-A, ukonan-D),
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
Taste/Energy: bitter, pungent (-K)
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
anti-inflammatory, antineoplastic, antioxidant, bitter, carminative, cholagogue, choleretic,hepatoprotective
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
It's chief use is in the manufacture of curry powders and has a long history of use as a natural dye.
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
§ Many of the medicinal uses of it arise from its actions on the liver. It has the ability to stimulate the secretion of HCl and bile. It also stimulates the gall bladder to emulsify and release the bile into the digestive tract, assisting in a general detoxifying action and decreasing cholesterol levels.
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
§ It also acts as an antioxidant in the body in general, and in the liver specifically. It prevents lipid peroxidation from a variety of agents, thus anyone with toxic exposure that manifests with signs of liver damage would benefit from it. It has been shown to inhibit inflammation in the hepatocytes, skin, joints, muscles and nerves.
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
§ Studies indicate that it is as powerful an antioxidant as vitamins C and E, and even beta-carotene. Antioxidants are also powerful preservatives, which helps explain why it has long been sprinkled on food to help retain its freshness.
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
It is a strong anti-inflammatory agent and is effective at decreasing inflammation for such conditions as RA, OA, trauma, musculoskeletal injury, post op, asthma, eczema, psoriasis an prevention of cardiovascular disease. It is a dual inhibitor of arachadonic acid metabolism.
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
§ The interest in the plant's potential for preventing neurologic diseases, such as MS and Alzheimer's, was spurred by the realization that elderly Indian populations that consume large amounts of it are far less likely than their Western counterparts to develop such ailments. Scientists conjecture that it benefits such neurologic illnesses by minimizing inflammation. More research in this area is clearly required before specific recommendations can be made.
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
It inhibits platelet aggregation.
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
§ It has anti-tumor effects, possibly due to the polysaccharide content. It has been used to treat and prevent cancer formation, initiation, promotion, and progression.
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
Contraindications: Bile duct obstruction and in pregnancy (due to emmenagogue and uterine stimulating effects).
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
It also has a mild ability to inhibit gram-positive bacteria and the essential oil is antifungal.
Curcuma longa (Turmeric)
Family: Pedaliaceae
Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil's Claw, Grapple plant)
Part Used: Tubers
Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil's Claw, Grapple plant)
Active Constituents: Flavonoids, iridoid glycosides (harpagoside, harpagide, procumbide),
Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil's Claw, Grapple plant)
Taste/Energy: bitter
Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil's Claw, Grapple plant)
Medicinal Actions: Anodyne, anti-inflammatory, anti-rheumatic, bitter
Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil's Claw, Grapple plant)
It contains procumbide, iridoid glycosides, which likely are responsible for the herb’s anti-inflammatory and analgesic actions. This plant is primarily used to treat musculoskeletal pain and inflammation, especially in osteoarthritis, RA and myalgia.
Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil's Claw, Grapple plant)
· It not only reduces the pain, but also improves range of motion and reduces degeneration of the discs in the spine and knees. Because of its vasodilatory action it improves circulation to the joints. The mechanism of action is not well understood but apparently does not involve mediation of the prostaglandin synthesis.
Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil's Claw, Grapple plant)
· Dr. John Bastyr used a Formula for arthritis called Formula A. The formula includes this herb, Cimicifuga, Yucca, Larrea and Achillea in equal parts.
Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil's Claw, Grapple plant)
It is a profound bitter and has effects as a choleretic and cholagogue. Because of this action, it is useful to treat maldigestion.
Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil's Claw, Grapple plant)
Contraindications: Cholelithiasis, PUD, PG
Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil's Claw, Grapple plant)
Family: Zygophyllaceae
Larrea tridentata, Larrea divaricata (Chaparral, Creosote Bush)
resins (Guaiuretic acid lignins including NGDA-nordihydroguaiuretic acid)
Larrea tridentata, Larrea divaricata (Chaparral, Creosote Bush)
Taste/Energy: bitter, drying, cooling
Larrea tridentata, Larrea divaricata (Chaparral, Creosote Bush)
Medicinal Actions: Anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti-neoplastic, anti-oxidant, anti-rheumatic, antifungal
Larrea tridentata, Larrea divaricata (Chaparral, Creosote Bush)
§ The resin of the plant contains the constituent NGDA which is a powerful anti-oxidant, inhibiting cyclooxygenase and causing a reduction in prostaglandin and thromboxane synthesis. It also inhibits lipoxygenase, again reducing leukotriene synthesis. NDGA has also been shown to reduce histamine and slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis from lung tissue and inhibiting the contractile response within lung parenchyma. Another contributor to the anti-inflammatory action of the plant is its ability to act as an anti-oxidant. It thereby stabilizes cell membranes, reducing lipid peroxidation inside the cell.
Larrea tridentata, Larrea divaricata (Chaparral, Creosote Bush)
It has been used for thousands of years by Native Americans for a variety of purposes. It has been employed primarily in tea form to help with cramping pains, joint pains, allergies and to eliminate intestinal parasites. Externally it has been applied to reduce inflammation and pain, and to promote healing of minor wounds.
Larrea tridentata, Larrea divaricata (Chaparral, Creosote Bush)
It has also been used as an anti-neoplastic agent, especially for melanoma and breast cancers that have broken through to the surface of the skin. This theory has not been born out in some in-vivo studies. NDGA has been shown to protect the chromosomes from damage by tumor promoting substances.
Larrea tridentata, Larrea divaricata (Chaparral, Creosote Bush)
It is also bacteriostatic and bacteriocidal and has been used to treat any infectious condition. Frequent dosing is necessary for this action to occur.
Larrea tridentata, Larrea divaricata (Chaparral, Creosote Bush)
§ It has traditionally been used as a hepatoprotective, however there are some recent case reports of alleged lived damage caused by taking it. It should not be used with patients who have liver damage, hepatitis or renal damage. It also lowers serum levels of LDL and VLDL.
Larrea tridentata, Larrea divaricata (Chaparral, Creosote Bush)
Contra-indications: It should not be used in pregnancy, lactation, active hepatitis, hepatic or renal damage. Because of the alkaloids contained in the plant, it should not be taken for more than 8-12 weeks at a time. Taking it for a period of time, discontinuing it for half the time it was taken and then repeating seems to be a safe dosing schedule. Monitor liver enzymes if there is any concern over liver toxicity.
Larrea tridentata, Larrea divaricata (Chaparral, Creosote Bush)
Part Used: leaves
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
terpenes (l-pinene) and sequi-terpenes, volatile oil (cajuputol, cajeputene, iso-cajeputene, papa-cajeputene)
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
antimicrobial
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
§ The oil contains numerous chemicals known as terpenoids. Australian standards were established for the amount of one compound, terpinen-4-ol, which must make up at least 30% and preferably 40–50% of the oil for it to be medically useful. Another compound, cineole, should make up less than 15% and preferably 2.5% of the oil.
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
§ Australian Aborigines used the leaves to treat cuts and skin infections. They would crush the leaves and apply them to the affected area.
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
§ In 1770, Captain James Cook and his party came upon a grove of trees thick with sticky, aromatic leaves that they later found made a spicy tea. This became a valued bush remedy used by the early European settlers.
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
§ A few drops of the oil added into a steam infusion provides powerful antimicrobial activity to the respiratory tract as well as aiding to open sinus passages.
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
§ The diluted oil can be used as a douche to treat vaginitis.
□ 1-2 gtt in olive oil; soak tampon & insert overnight.
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
It has also been used topically to treat eczema, psoriasis, acne, and acne rosacea as an oil, cream or ointment.
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
§ A preliminary trial found that rinsing the mouth with 1 tablespoon oil solution four times daily effectively treated thrush in AIDS patients. Solutions containing no more than 5% should be used orally and should never be swallowed.
□ For thrush.
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
§ It has also been used as an anti-parasitic to treat bacterial and fungal infections of the skin.
□ Onychomycosis-straight oil topically; file down nail & apply.
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
§ The oil is for external use and in people with sensitive skin it should be diluted with a bland fixed oil such as almond oil. There is currently a wide range of products on the market that contain the oil.
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
Side Effects: Use caution for extensive areas of broken skin or areas affected by rashes not due to fungus. The oil may burn if it gets into the eyes, nose, mouth, or other tender areas. Some people have allergic reactions, including rashes and itching, when applying tea tree oil. For this reason, only a small amount should be applied when first using it. The oil should never be swallowed, as it may cause nerve damage and other problems.
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
Contraindications: Internal use of the oil
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
Family: Myrtaceae
Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
Family: Fabaceae
Pea/legumes, glycerrhiza, astragulus, trigonella
Piscidia erythrina (Jamaican Dogwood, Fish Poison Tree)
Part Used: Stem and bark
Piscidia erythrina (Jamaican Dogwood, Fish Poison Tree)
Medicinal Actions: Analgesic, anti-spasmodic, sedative
Piscidia erythrina (Jamaican Dogwood, Fish Poison Tree)
Dysmenorrhea: This herb & viburnum in equal parts, 30 gtt q 20 min x 6
Piscidia erythrina (Jamaican Dogwood, Fish Poison Tree)
It is a profound analgesic and anti-spasmodic and is useful to treat any condition of pain and spasm such as neuralgia and migraine. It can also be used to decrease ovarian and uterine pain. It is indicated for pain, intestinal colic, gall-stone colic, renal colic and insomnia. It is also used to treat dysmenorrhea, lumbalgia, nervous tachycardia and anxiety.
Piscidia erythrina (Jamaican Dogwood, Fish Poison Tree)
§ It is very useful in treatment of dysmenorrhea, both relaxing spasm of the smooth muscle and promoting normal muscular contraction.
Piscidia erythrina (Jamaican Dogwood, Fish Poison Tree)
It is also used in formulas to address insomnia due to anxiety. It will promote quite and restful sleep. If Valerian does not work, this is a good second choice.
Piscidia erythrina (Jamaican Dogwood, Fish Poison Tree)
Toxicity: First sign is contraction, then later a dilation of the pupils. You will also see bradycardia, decreased respiratory rate. Some patients will first experience nausea, vomiting, headache. High toxic doses will trigger convulsions and tetany.
Contraindications: Pregnancy and lactation
Piscidia erythrina (Jamaican Dogwood, Fish Poison Tree)
§ Trauma, migraines
Piscidia erythrina (Jamaican Dogwood, Fish Poison Tree)
Tincture (1:5): 15– 30 drops Q 20 minutes up to six doses (acute use)
Piscidia erythrina (Jamaican Dogwood, Fish Poison Tree)
Family: Euphorbiaceae
Ricinus communis, Oleum ricini (Castor bean, Palma Christi)
Part Used: Seeds (oil from)
Ricinus communis, Oleum ricini (Castor bean, Palma Christi)
Active Constituents: Fixed oils, glyceride (ricinolein), mucilage, ricinine
Ricinus communis, Oleum ricini (Castor bean, Palma Christi)
Medicinal Actions: Cathartic/purgative, anti-inflammatory
Ricinus communis, Oleum ricini (Castor bean, Palma Christi)
§ Castor oil has been historically used as a cathartic and/or purgative. Today, it is rarely used as a laxative or purgative. It is few internal uses; to expel worms after other anti-helminthic herbs have been ingested and to induce labor when overdue.
Ricinus communis, Oleum ricini (Castor bean, Palma Christi)
§ Castor Oil is used topically to reduce inflammation. It is applied to treat sprains, strains and bruising after injury. It is also used after surgery to reduce adhesion formation in the area of the closed wound. It is used only after the wound has completely closed.
Ricinus communis, Oleum ricini (Castor bean, Palma Christi)
§ It is also used to reduce the pain and discomfort of endometriosis, fibroids and any other inflammation of the abdominal or pelvic regions.
Ricinus communis, Oleum ricini (Castor bean, Palma Christi)
§ A castor oil pack is applied to the liver region of the abdomen during a cleanse or when a person has inflammation/hepatitis.
Ricinus communis, Oleum ricini (Castor bean, Palma Christi)
§ The oil is used internally to induce labor contractions. It is thought to act in one of several possible ways. By creating strong and spasmodic cramps of the intestines (which lie around and above the uterus at the end of pregnancy) it might cause a reflexive cramping and spasm of the uterine muscle inducing labor.
Ricinus communis, Oleum ricini (Castor bean, Palma Christi)
Toxicity: Castor Oil has a nauseating taste. It becomes a purgative or emetic when taken in higher than recommended oral doses. The seeds are poisonous. A small amount can be lethal if ingested.
Ricinus communis, Oleum ricini (Castor bean, Palma Christi)
Family: Salicaceae
Salix alba, Salix nigra (White Willow, Black Willow)
Part Used: Bark
Salix alba, Salix nigra (White Willow, Black Willow)
Active Constituents: Salicin, Tannin
Salix alba, Salix nigra (White Willow, Black Willow)
Medicinal Actions: Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-rheumatic, antiseptic, astringent, febrifuge, sedative
Salix alba, Salix nigra (White Willow, Black Willow)
§ The salicylates in the bark of Salix are anti-inflammatory, blocking prostaglandin synthesis.
Salix alba, Salix nigra (White Willow, Black Willow)
It is used to alleviate pain, reduce inflammation, decrease fever and reduce excessive discharges. It is taken to treat headaches, myalgia, rheumatism, fever and chills, and as symptomatic treatment during infectious processes.
Salix alba, Salix nigra (White Willow, Black Willow)
§ Historically, the bark was used topically for any swelling or inflammation of the joints. It is indicated to use with any arthritis accompanied by pain and inflammation. In general, it will reduce pain and inflammation due to injury and inflammation.
Salix alba, Salix nigra (White Willow, Black Willow)
The glycoside salicin, from which the body can split off salicylic acid, is thought to be the source of the anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving actions of it. The conversion of constituents into salicylic acid takes place via gastric flora can take hours but once absorbed lasts longer than standard aspirin products. For this reason this is not very effective for acute pain relief. (Tilgner)
Salix alba, Salix nigra (White Willow, Black Willow)
Contraindications: ASA sensitivity, current ulcers or active gastritis. Also contraindicated for use by any patient taking anti-coagulant medication.
Salix alba, Salix nigra (White Willow, Black Willow)
Family: Asteraceae
Daisy family, looks like chammomile
Tanacetum parthenium, Chrysanthemum parthenium (Feverfew)
Part Used: Leaf
Taste/Energy: bitter, pungent, cooling
Tanacetum parthenium, Chrysanthemum parthenium (Feverfew)
Active Constituents: sesquiterpene lactones
, parthenolide
Tanacetum parthenium, Chrysanthemum parthenium (Feverfew)
Toxicity: None known, though a small group of people have developed mouth ulcers when chewing the fresh leaves. There are also some who develop contact dermatitis after contact due to allergy to the sesquiterpene lactones. Some gastrointestinal discomfort occurred in a few people due to bitter action on digestion.
Tanacetum parthenium, Chrysanthemum parthenium (Feverfew)
Medicinal Actions: Anti-inflammatory, febrifuge
Tanacetum parthenium, Chrysanthemum parthenium (Feverfew)
§ Traditionally,it was used to treat inflammation, relieve menstrual discomfort, decrease symptoms of RA and treat aches and pains. It stimulates circulation, moving qi stagnation and blood whether it is accumulated in the head, joints or uterus. (Bergner)
Tanacetum parthenium, Chrysanthemum parthenium (Feverfew)
It contains sesquiterpene lactones, over 85% being comprised of parthenolide.
Tanacetum parthenium, Chrysanthemum parthenium (Feverfew)
§ It is used primarily for prophylaxis for migraine headaches, however it is an effective treatment for both chronic and acute headache and migraine. It is thought that increased secretion of serotonin from platelets starts a cascade of events that leads to migraine. It helps prevent excessive aggregation of platelets and inhibits the release of certain chemicals, including serotonin and some inflammatory mediators from neutrophils. Thus, it reduces local inflammation and prevents vasoconstriction and dilation. It also stabilizes mast cells, decreasing histamine released during the inflammatory process and inhibits phospholipase A2. All of these actions reduce the severity, duration, and frequency of migraine headaches and improve blood vessel tone.
Tanacetum parthenium, Chrysanthemum parthenium (Feverfew)
It is used as a prophylactic to reduce the frequency and severity of migraine headaches and has been show to be effective in up to 70% of migraine sufferers. It may take 6-24 weeks to show that activity, and does not work for all people, and the limitations of use are not well understood.
Tanacetum parthenium, Chrysanthemum parthenium (Feverfew)
According to Chanchal Cabrera, it is best used when the migraine has a sensation of heat, cravings for cool compresses and iced drinks, redness of the face, throbbing headache or dilated temporal arteries. It should not be used when the headache is gripping, constrictive or crushing, where the person feels chilled or craves hot drinks of hot applications.
Tanacetum parthenium, Chrysanthemum parthenium (Feverfew)
Long term users often report beneficial side effects such as relief from depression, nausea and arthritic pain due to inflammation.
Tanacetum parthenium, Chrysanthemum parthenium (Feverfew)