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68 Cards in this Set

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Affect:
Affect:

Affectivity (affect [pronounced af'-ekt] is the outward manifestation of subjective emotions)
Akathisia:
Akathisia: Extreme inability to sit still, motor restlessness (tapping, rocking, pacing), or muscle-quivering tremors
Anhedonia:
Anhedonia: At least one symptom must be depressed mood most of the day, or markedly diminished/loss of interest or pleasure in all, or most, activities (anhedonia)

Expressions of feeling sad, unhappy, blue, “down in the dumps”; loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities (anhedonia)
Anxiety
Anxiety: Defense mechanisms help individuals to resolve mental conflicts, reduce anxiety (fear of impending danger),
Assaultive
Assaultive: assaultive (threatening to hurt others or actually striking someone).
Athetoid
Athetoid: The syndrome may extend to include involuntary athetoid (writhing) movements of the fingers, toes, and extremities; pill-rolling movements of the fingers; back and sideways head jerks, usually to one side; and shrugging of the shoulders.
Benzodiazepine
Benzodiazepine: The most common group of antianxiety medications is the benzodiazepines
bipolar disorder:
bipolar disorder: Broad mood variations from mania to major depression are symptoms of bipolar disorder (BPD) or bipolar affective disorder (BPAD)
catalepsy
catalepsy: Catalepsy (the person maintains the body position in which he or she is placed—waxy flexibility)
catatonia
catatonia: Schizophrenia is a group of psychotic disorders that have two or more of the following positive symptoms: delusions, hallucinations, disorganized speech, grossly disorganized behavior, and catatonia (stupor, muscle rigidity).
Affect
Affectivity (affect [pronounced af'-ekt] is the outward manifestation of subjective emotions)
Akathisia
Extreme inability to sit still, motor restlessness (tapping, rocking, pacing), or muscle-quivering tremors
Anhedonia
At least one symptom must be depressed mood most of the day, or markedly diminished/loss of interest or pleasure in all, or most, activities (anhedonia)
Expressions of feeling sad, unhappy, blue, “down in the dumps”
loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities (anhedonia)
Anxiety
Defense mechanisms help individuals to resolve mental conflicts, reduce anxiety (fear of impending danger),
Assaultive
assaultive (threatening to hurt others or actually striking someone).
Athetoid
The syndrome may extend to include involuntary athetoid (writhing) movements of the fingers, toes, and extremities
Benzodiazepine
The most common group of antianxiety medications is the benzodiazepines
bipolar disorder
Broad mood variations from mania to major depression are symptoms of bipolar disorder (BPD) or bipolar affective disorder (BPAD)
catalepsy
Catalepsy (the person maintains the body position in which he or she is placed—waxy flexibility)
catatonia
Schizophrenia is a group of psychotic disorders that have two or more of the following positive symptoms
cogwheeling (movement)
Cogwheeling movements
compulsion
A compulsion is a repetitive behavior (eg, handwashing, cleaning) or a mental act (eg, counting, praying) that the person feels driven to perform, sometimes constantly.
Cyclothymic
A cyclothymic disorder is a mild form of this condition. (The more severe form is known as bipolar disorder.)
Decanoate
In some cases, blood work is done (eg, clozapine [Clozaril] maintenance) or long-acting neuroleptic injections (such as decanoates, sometimes called depot injections) are given
Delusion
Feelings of worthlessness (low self-esteem) or excessive or inappropriate guilt—may be delusional (fixed, false belief not shared by others)
dual diagnosis
The term dual diagnosis literally means that the person has two separate chronic conditions at the same time.
Dyskinesia
General dyskinesia
Dysthymia
Dysthymia is defined as a depressed mood for most of the day, most days.
Dystonia
Dystonia
Echolalia
Echolalia (repetition of another person's words or phrases)
Echopraxia
Echopraxia (repetition of another person's movements)
Entitlement
Narcissistic personality disorder
Euthymia
(Euthymia is the term that means normal mood.)
Factitious
A factitious disorder is one that is artificial or made up.
Forensic
Forensic clients are often those who are brought to the hospital from a jail or prison. In many cases, forensic clients have been accused of a serious crime, such as murder
functional disorder
no specific causative agent is located. This type of mental illness is called a functional disorder.
Grandiosity
grandiosity (feelings of invincibility and exaggerated self-importance), distractibility (inability to concentrate), and excessive involvement in pleasurable activities that have a high potential for painful or undesirable consequences.
Hallucination
Loss of contact with reality—altered perceptions and sensory changes such as increased watchfulness (hypervigilance), hallucinations (hearing, seeing, feeling things that are not there), misperceptions, distorted thinking, difficulty in filtering out irrelevant stimuli, paranoia (unreasonable fears), delusional thinking (false beliefs)
Hypersomnia
Sleep disturbances—insomnia (difficulty falling or staying asleep) or hypersomnia (sleeping too much)
Hypervigilance
Loss of contact with reality—altered perceptions and sensory changes such as increased watchfulness (hypervigilance), hallucinations (hearing, seeing, feeling things that are not there), misperceptions, distorted thinking, difficulty in filtering out irrelevant stimuli, paranoia (unreasonable fears), delusional thinking (false beliefs)
Hypomania
Hypomania (below mania) has less-intense characteristics than mania, and usually does not require hospitalization when it occurs alone.
Intrusive
Poor impulse control
Lability
Lithium is the most commonly used mood stabilizer in the treatment of bipolar and schizoaffective disorders, major depression, and intermittent explosive disorder. It is also used to reduce impulsivity and mood lability (sudden changes) when treating personality disorders.
Malingering
In addition, tests may be performed to rule out the client who is malingering
Mania
Agitation, elation, hyperactivity, and hyperexcitability characterize mania.
milieu therapy
A therapeutic environment (milieu therapy) is one in which all aspects of the surroundings (physical and social) are designed to promote health and to enable clients to cope with life's demands.
Mutism
Mutism (refusal to speak)
Neologism
Does he or she coin new words that are not really words (neologisms)
Neuroleptic
Antipsychotics are also known as neuroleptics (“major tranquilizers”). The classic antipsychotic medications (eg, haloperidol [Haldol], chlorpromazine [Thorazine], fluphenazine [Prolixin], perphenazine [Trilafon]) are most effective in treating “positive” symptoms of psychosis.
Obsession
An obsession is a recurrent, persistent, intrusive thought or belief that the person cannot ignore.
oculogyric crisis
Oculogyric crisis
opisthotonos
Opisthotonos
organic disorder
In some cases, the healthcare team identifies a physical (organic) cause for the client's mental disorder (organic disorder). An endocrine disorder (especially of the thyroid),
paranoia
Loss of contact with reality—altered perceptions and sensory changes such as increased watchfulness (hypervigilance), hallucinations (hearing, seeing, feeling things that are not there), misperceptions, distorted thinking, difficulty in filtering out irrelevant stimuli, paranoia (unreasonable fears), delusional thinking (false beliefs)
perseverate
Does conversation make sense? Does the client dwell on one subject (perseverate) or always return to the same subject? Is the client able to concentrate on a topic? Is speech tangential and loose?
Phobia
A specific phobia is a persistent, excessive, unreasonable, and severe fear of a particular thing or event.
Polydipsic
Some clients are polydipsic (drink excess amounts) and their fluids are restricted.
Psychiatrist
A psychiatrist is a physician (MD or DO) who has received advanced education in the treatment of mental disorders.
Psychometric
Neuropsychiatric (psychometric) testing includes an in-depth interview and various tests.
Psychosis
Marked deviation from normal behavior and seriously inappropriate conduct may indicate psychosis, a thought disorder that interferes with one's ability to recognize and to deal with reality.
Psychotropic
Psychotropic drugs (mood modifiers) include antipsychotics, antianxiety sedative–hypnotics, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants
Rapport
Establish rapport (harmonious relationship)
Regression
Regression is a return to infantile or childish behavior
Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia is a group of psychotic disorders that have two or more of the following positive symptoms
tardive dyskinesia
Tardive dyskinesia (TD or TDK) is a syndrome of involuntary movements.
vulnerable adult
This law is called the vulnerable adult law
DSM-IV-TR
A complete physical examination is done to rule out a physical disease or injury that may have caused the illness. Specific diagnoses are identified, based on the taxonomy presented in the American Psychiatric Association's (APA, 2000) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth edition, Revised (DSM-IV-TR).