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73 Cards in this Set

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What are seven types of aggression in animals?
The seven types of aggression in animals are territorial, play, dominance, intermale, fear/pain, redirected, and prey.
What is the definition of aggression in animals?
The definition of aggression in animals is exhibiting a behavior with an intent to harm.
What are the characteristics of territorial aggression?
Territorial aggression is an animal acting to protect its territory or space.
What are the characteristics of dominance aggression?
Dominance aggression is an animal acting in a manner to another member of the pack to influence rank structure, and is usually displayed when its position within the hierarchy is threatened.
What are the characteristics of intermale aggression?
Usually intermale aggression occurs between males, but can be displayed between dominant females.
What are the characteristics of fear/pain aggression?
Fear/pain aggression results from an animal feeling fear or pain causing it to attempt to escape from that situation.
What are the characteristics of redirected aggression?
Redirected aggression occurs when an animal has perceived a threat, but carries out aggression towards another object or being, usually a target which was not related in any way to the original threat.
What are the characteristics of prey aggression?
Prey aggression is behavior directed towards a prey-like object.
What are the characteristics of play aggression?
Play aggression is usually seen demonstrated in younger animals, and is used as one of the initial steps in determining its current position in relation to others within the hierarchy as well as to explore future opportunities to rise within the ranks.
What is the meaning of the term agnostic?
Agnostic is a term used to describe behavior during social conflicts.
What is an animal behaviorist?
An animal behaviorist is a specialist that studies specific behaviors in animals.
What is coprophagia?
Coprophagia is the term used for an animal consuming feces, usually its own.
What is counterconditioning?
Counterconditioning is a training method used to condition an animal to react to stimuli with the opposite reaction previously exhibited.
What is cribbing?
Cribbing is a destructive behavior of equines demonstrated by using their upper teeth on objects.
What is desensitization?
Desensitization is to expose an animal to stimuli by gradually increasing exposure.
What does the term domesticated describe?
For an animal to be termed as domesticated, it has either been tamed or thru lines of selective breeding is classified as such.
What is ethology?
Ethology is the study of behavior.
What is an ethologist?
An ethologist is a specialist who studies behavior.
What is extinction?
Extinction is the gradual removal of positive reinforcement.
What is the meaning of the term feral?
A feral animal is one which is untamed or wild.
What does it mean to describe an animal as fractious?
A fractious animal is one which is difficult to handle or troublesome.
What is a hierarchy?
A hierarchy is a group which has been organized by ranks.
What is obedience?
Obedience is submission to authority or restraint.
What is an onychetomy?
An onychetomy is the surgical removal of claws.
What is positive reinforcement?
Positive reinforcement is to reward or encourage positive behavior.
What is the definition of punishment?
Punishment is to use adverse stimuli applied immediately following a negative behavior.
What is separation anxiety?
Separation anxiety is brought on by separation of a pet from its human, usually resulting in destructive behaviors.
What are the characteristics of scenthounds?
Scenthounds are a group of dogs which track prey by smell.
What are the characteristics of sighthounds?
Sighthounds are a group of dogs which track prey by sight.
What is the meaning of the term socialization?
Socialization is the process by which an animal learns about pack hierarchy and its place within it.
What is a stimulus?
A stimulus is anything that invokes a response.
What is a subordinate?
A subordinate animal is one which is below the rank of alpha within the hierarchy.
What is surgical debarking?
Surgical debarking is a process which removes all or part of the vocal cords in the larynx.
What is meant by the term tractable?
A tractable animal is one which is easily handled.
What is the definition of behavior?
Behavior is an activity or pattern displayed by an individual or group, usually motivated by social tendencies, stimuli or environment.
What are five types of social arrangements in animals?
Five types of social arrangements in animals are female groupings, harem groupings, compound structure, solitary/territorial, and paired/territorial.
What is a female grouping?
A female grouping is one in which the individuals are entirely female, with their interactions with males limited to mating season.
What is a harem grouping?
A harem grouping is one in which a group of females and young are protected and serviced by one male.
What is a compound structure?
A compound structure is a combination of adult females and males along with juveniles in the same pack, and is the best example of hierarchy.
What are some of the more common animals attributed to a compound structure?
A compound structure is related to dogs, pigs, and primates.
What animals are most commonly associated with female grouping?
Female grouping is most commonly seen in ruminants.
What is a solitary/territorial social arrangement?
Solitary/territorial social arrangements are defined by a female living alone with her young and protecting its territory.
What is a paired/territorial social arrangement?
A paired/territorial social arrangement is one in which male and female pair up for reproductive as well as territorial reasons, and is usually a lifelong grouping.
What is the definition of a pack?
A pack is defined by multiple animals living in large groups, usually including both adult males and females along with juveniles, with a dominant male and female alpha leader.
How is eye contact used?
Direct eye contact can be meant as a challenge and can cause aggression.
What is a bite correction?
A bite correction happens naturally between dogs and is used to put another in its place.
What are the signs of a dominant posture?
Dominant posture is stiff, ears are pricked forward, body is forward, and tail is upright.
What is the definition of punishment?
Punishment is delivering adverse stimuli in response to a behavior.
What is positive reinforcement?
Positive reinforcement is a pleasurable reward given in response to a desired behavior.
What are six learning and behavior forms?
Examples of learning and behavior forms are positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement, punishment, extinction, counterconditioning, and desensitization.
What is extinction?
Extinction is the gradual removal of a positive reward in response to positive behavior that was previously rewarded.
What is counterconditioning?
Counterconditioning is to train an animal to respond in a manner opposite to their previous behavior in reaction to same stimuli.
What is desensitization?
Desensitization is to gradually expose an animal to stimuli in order to avoid a reactionary behavior.
What is the number one reason for euthanasia in animals?
Animals are most commonly euthanized due to behavioral problems.
What are the eight most common behavioral problems in canines?
The most common behavioral problems in canines are digging, nuisance barking, separation anxiety, dominance, fear, digging, fence jumping, copraphagia, and noise sensitivity.
What is the first foremost response in felines to almost any stimuli?
The most immediate response to stimuli for felines is escape.
What are the five most common behavioral problems in felines?
The most common behavioral problems in felines are litterbox aversion, inappropriate elimination, destructive scratching,finicky eating, and houseplant eating.
What are the three most common behavioral problems in equines?
The most common behavioral problems in equines are cribbing, aggression, and trailering fear.
What are some of the reasons for litterbox aversion?
Litterbox aversion can caused by the box being dirty, not enough boxes, shared boxes, wrong litter, the wrong size of box, wrong location, or a perception by a feline that is associated with pain by a negative experience.
What is the biggest difference between a behavioral-wellness program and traditional methods of treating behavioral disorders?
A behavioral-wellness program has heavy emphasis on problem prevention and early appropriate intervention.
What are the two most important characteristics of an effective behavior consultant?
An effective behavior consultant should possess a mix of academic and hands-on training, and should treat clients and pets with respect.
Which dog training device is considered the most humane?
The most humane dog training device is a head collar.
What is the most important component of successful problem prevention?
The most important component in problem prevention is elicting and reinforcing desirable behavior.
What is the best location for multiple litter boxes in a multicat household?
Multiple litter boxes should be placed not adjacent to one another and away from food, water, and nesting places.
What is the proper way to use food to train a pet?
The use of food must be changed from a lure to elicit the behavior to only available as a reinforcer after the behavior has been performed.
What would be the most effective problem-solving counselling given for a pet described as hyperactive?
An owner complaining of a pet's hyperactivity should be provided ideas in which to fulfill the pet's unmet needs for play and physical activity.
What is the difference between positive punishment and negative punishment?
Positive punishment is the addition of something unpleasant, and negative punishment is the removal of something pleasant.
How many applications of positive punishment must be applied ineffectively before being considered unsuccessful?
After five ineffective applications, positive punishment can be considered unsuccessful.
What is the goal of restraint and force in the veterinary clinic?
The goal of restraint and force is to keep personnel and pet safe during necessary procedures.
What is the most important factor in the safe, efficient, and nontraumatic handling of patients?
The most important factor in handling of patients is the handler's knowledge of the species' behavior, with ability to observe, interpret, and react.
What are four postures to avoid when approaching a fearful or unfamiliar dog?
When approaching a fearful or unfamiliar dog, avoid direct eye contact, frontal approach, reaching toward head, and leaning over dog.
Why is it critical to adequately prepare veterinary staff before initiating a behavior-wellness program?
If unprepared to conduct an effective behavior-wellness program, it can lead to owner frustration, loss of credibility, liability issues, or a worsening problem.
What is Feliway?
Feliway is a synthetic analog of cat facial pheromones.