Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/48

Click to flip

48 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
homeostasis and control mechanisms
balance is maintained by control mechanisms in the body
health
proper and normal functioning
stress management
our conscious monitoring of stress, developing skills to deal with stress, and the practice of putting those skills into effect
stages of life cycle
egg, embryo, baby, child, adolescent, adult, old age
biological rhythms (biorhythm)
physiological rhythms: temperature, sleep, alertness, hormone levels
circadian rhythms
physiological rhythms operating on a general cycle of 24 hours
ultradian rhythms
help moderate hemispheric dominance in the brain; they oscillate in the minute or hourly range instead of every 24 hours
seasonal rhythms
physiological rhythms that change with the seasons
entrainment
the concept that two things with separate rhythms put together will soon adopt one rhythm
pathology
the study of disease
etiology
the study of the cause and origin of disease
acute
characterized by sudden onset
ambulatory
able to walk
anomaly
an abnormal occurrence, especially in reference to birth defects
anaplasia
the irregular structural characteristics of a cell that identify it as a malignant cancer cell
atrophy
a wasting away or decrease in size of a cell, tissue, organ, or part of the body caused by lack of nourishment, inactivity, or loss of nerve supply
benign
referring to a tumor or abnormal growth that is not cancerous and does not invade nearby tissues or spread to other parts of the body
chronic
slow developing, recurring
clinical
based on or characterized by observable and diagnosable symptoms
diagnosis
the identification of disease or trauma
malignant
cancerous, a growth with a tendency to invade and destroy nearby tissue and spread to other parts of the body
metastatic
change of position, state, or form. the spread of a disease-producing agency (as cancer cells) from the initial or primary site of disease to another part of the body; the process by which such spreading occurs
hyperplasia
an increase in the number of cells in an organ or tissue
inflammation
a protective response from the body in response to infection or injury, characterized by swelling, heat, redness, and pain
neoplasm
an abnormal growth of tissue that may be benign or malignant
pain
a basic bodily sensation induced by a noxious stimulus, received by naked nerve endings, characterized by physical discomfort (as pricking, throbbing, or aching), and typically leading to evasive action
acute pain
sudden onset pain
chronic pain
slow developing, recurring pain
phantom pain
pain that is felt in a part of the body (usually an extremity) that either no longer exists due to amputation or is insensate as a result of nerve severance
somatic
of, relating to, or affecting the body
visceral
felt in or as if in the viscera (internal organs)
prognosis
the prospect of recovery as anticipated from the usual course of disease or peculiarities of the case
sign
evidence of disease as perceived by the doctor
symptom
subjective evidence of disease as perceived by the patient
syndrome
a group of signs or symptoms characteristic of a particular disease or abnormal condition
systemic
affecting the whole body
bacterial
caused by microorganisms capable of reproduction; some strains of bacteria cause infection (and some are beneficial)
cancer
a malignant tumor of potentially unlimited growth that expands locally by invasion and systemically by metastasis
malignant
cancerous; a growth with a tendency to invade and destroy nearby tissue and spread to other parts of the body
congenital
existing at or dating from birth
degenerative
characterized by diminishing capabilities
epidemic
a sudden outbreak of disease in numbers much higher than normal
exacerbation
a marked increase in symptoms or severity of disease
fungal
caused by a mold, yeast, or mushroom; some fungi are beneficial; some, such as ringworm and athlete's foot, are not
idiopathic
of unknown origin
infectious
capable of causing infection (the invasion and growth of microorganisms that may cause cellular injury in tissue)
trauma
a physical injury or wound caused by an external force of violence, which may cause death or permanent disability, also used to describe severe emotional or psychological shock or distress
viral
caused by a virus (an intracellular parasite that causes disease)