• Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/6

Click to flip

6 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Learning how to read and understand food labels can help you make healthier choices.
Here are some tips for making the most of the information on the Nutrition Facts label:
>>Everyone look at their handout … find the nutrition label and follow along.<<
look at where it says Start here. you want to Note the size of a single serving and how many servings are in the package. Not all packages are one serving.
Check total calories per serving. Look at the serving size and how many servings you’re really consuming. If you double the servings you eat, you are going to need to double everything on the label
Limit these nutrients. Remember, you need to limit your total fat to no more than 56–78 grams a day and less than 300 mg cholesterol. This will help decrease your risk of developing cardiovascular disease as an adult. Beware the Trans fats and partially hydrogenated oils (which are Trans fats in disguise).
Get enough of these nutrients. Make sure you get 100 percent of the fiber, vitamins and other nutrients you need every day because these are good for you. Fiber is important because it lowers cholesterol and improves digestion and you should eat 21-35 grams per day.
The % Daily Value section tells you the percent of each nutrient in a single serving, in terms of the daily recommended amount. As a guide, if you want to consume less of a nutrient, choose foods with a lower %. If you want to consume more of a nutrient (such as fiber), seek foods with a higher % DV. For example, a serving of Cheerios with ½ cup of skim milk is just 3 percent of the daily value of fat intake and 11 percent of the daily value of fiber intake.
In addition to the Nutrition Facts label, a lot of foods today also come with nutrient content claims provided by the manufacturer. The chart below provides some of the most commonly used nutrient content claims, along with a detailed description of what the claim means.
If a food claims to be…Calorie free It means that one serving of the product contains Less than 5 calories
Sugar free means Less than 0.5 grams of sugar
Fat free means Less than 0.5 grams of fat
Low fat means 3 grams of fat or less
Reduced fat means At least 25 percent less fat than the regular product
and Light (lite) means At least one-third fewer calories or no more than half the fat of the regular product, or no more than half the sodium of the regular product
• Remember that the information shown in these panels is based on 2,000 calories a day. You may need to consume less or more than 2,000 calories depending upon your age, gender, activity level, and whether you’re trying to lose, gain or maintain your weight
and now here is...
If you cant remember just think…
“Free” means a food has the least possible amount of the specified nutrient.
“Very Low” and “Low” means the food has a little more than foods labeled “Free.”
“Reduced” or “Less” mean the food has 25 percent less of a specific nutrient than the regular version of the food.
next