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22 Cards in this Set

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noun

1 : a member of any of various peoples (as in antiquity) who lived or were reputed to live chiefly in caves
*2 : a person characterized by reclusive habits or outmoded or reactionary attitudes
troglodyte
"Trōglē" may sound like a scary cave-dwelling ogre, but it's actually just a perfectly unintimidating Greek root that means "hole" or "cave."
verb

: to look or stare with sullen annoyance or anger
glower ("ow" as in "cow")
part of its story leads us to Scotland. Originally, the word meant simply "to look intently" or "to stare in amazement," but by the late 1700s, glowering stares were being associated with anger. distant relative of Middle Low German "glūren," which means "to be overcast," and of Middle Dutch "gloeren," meaning "to leer."
adjective

1 a : of or relating to the walls of a part or cavity b : of, relating to, or forming the upper posterior wall of the head
2 : attached to the main wall rather than the axis or a cross wall of a plant ovary
*3 : of or relating to college living or its regulation
parietal
from Latin "paries," meaning "wall of a cavity or hollow organ" and has been around since the 15th century, getting more definitions
noun

1 : energy, pep
*2 : courage, determination
3 : know-how, expertise
moxie
originated from a cola brand in the early 1900s that may have been thought to bring verve and vim back to the most lethargic of people
adjective

: having an allover pattern of small flowers and plants
millefleur
from the Latin "mille florae" meaning "a thousand flowers"
verb

: recoil, retract; especially : to return to a prior position
resile
derive from the Latin verb "resilire" which comes from "salire," meaning "to jump"
noun

: one that practices or is skilled in the art of bell ringing
campanologist
from "campana," Late Latin for "bell")
verb

1 a : wash, bathe *b : to flow along or against
2 : pour
lave
from Latin "lavare," meaning "to wash."

noun

1 : a net for catching birds or fish
*2 : something impeding activity, progress, or freedom : restraint— usually used in plural

verb

1: confine; enmesh
trammel
traces back to the Late Latin "tremaculum," which comes from Latin "tres," meaning "three," and "macula," meaning "mesh."
noun

*1 : an inexperienced or incompetent boxer
2 : oaf, lout
palooka
may have come from a popularized comic during 1924 called
verb

1 : to turn back to an earlier topic or circumstance
*2 : to go back to something as an origin or source
hark back
originated from the use of the word "hark" (meaning "listen") in hunting and direction, later taking figurative meanings
noun

: partiality to cronies especially as evidenced in the appointment of political hangers-on to office without regard to their qualifications
cronyism
play on the Greek word "chronios," meaning "long-lasting," from "chronos," meaning "time;" started bad connotation towards mid-20th century, but used to just mean "friendship"
adjective

: idle and ineffectual : indolent : sluggish : inactive : torpid
fainéant
borrowed from French; it derives from "fait-nient," which literally means "does nothing," and ultimately traces back to the verb "faindre," or "feindre," meaning "to feign." Feign means to pretend or make pretense of.
verb>

1 : to drink liquor freely or excessively
*2 : to take part in a drunken revel : engage in dissolute behavior
carouse
The French adopted the German term as "carous," using the adverb in their expression "boire (to drink) carous," and that phrase, with its idiomatic sense of "to empty the cup," led to "carrousse," a French noun meaning "a large draft of liquor."
adjective

: having a full rounded figure : pleasingly plump
zaftig
comes from the Yiddish "zaftik," which means "juicy" or "succulent" and which in turn derives from "zaft," meaning "juice" or "sap."
often used to describe women pleasingly plump, full-figured, shapely, womanly, curvy, curvaceous, voluptuous, statuesque.
noun

: a party or reception held in the evening
soiree
French, "soirée" means "evening party," or simply "evening" and that comes from the Latin adverb "sero" (meaning "at a late hour"), which comes from the Latin adjective "serus" (meaning "late")
verb

: to make more violent, bitter, or severe
exacerbate
the Latin adjective "acer," meaning "sharp," forms the basis of a number of words that have come into English. The words "acerbic" ("having a bitter temper or sour mood"), "acrid" ("having a sharp taste or odor"), and "acrimony" ("a harsh manner or disposition") are just the tip of the iceberg. derives from the prefix "ex-," which means "out of" or "outside," and "acerbus," which means "harsh" or "bitter" and comes from "acer."
noun

1 : a brief survey or sketch : outline
*2 : an immediate impression; especially : insight
aperçu (apersoo)
the past participle of the verb "apercevoir" in French ("to perceive" or "to comprehend"), which in turn comes from Latin "percipere" ("to perceive").
noun

: a song of lamentation for the dead : elegy
threnody
borrowed from the Greek word "thrēnōidia" (from "thrēnos," the word for "dirge")
adjective

: located in the vanguard : advanced
vanward
originated from "vanguard" that means "the forefront of an action or movement" or is the head troops of an army; writers appended "-ward," an adjective suffix meaning "is situated in the direction of" to the word, making it mean "in the forefront"
noun

: an act or instance of predicating (affirmation)
predication
can also mean "foundation" or "base," and possibly "implication" or this word can apply to grammar
noun

: a person who flits about in social activity
gadabout
related to "Gadfly," which is a term used for any of a number of winged pests (such as horseflies) that bite or annoy livestock? traces back to the Middle English verb "gadden," meaning "to wander without a specific aim or purpose."