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30 Cards in this Set

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adjective
1 : relating to a style of artistic expression prevalent especially in the 17th century that is noted for its use of complex forms, bold ornamentation, and contrasting elements to evoke tension
*2 : characterized by grotesqueness, extravagance, complexity, or flamboyance
baroque
verb
1 : avenge
2 : to free from allegation or blame
3 *a : confirm, substantiate b : to provide justification or defense for : justify
vindicate
derives from the Latin "vindicatus," meaning "to set free", avenge, lay claim to"
adjective
: of, relating to, or marked by a state of extreme emotional excitement or rapturous delight
ectastic
derive from the Greek verb "existanai" ("to put out of place"), which was used in a Greek phrase meaning "to drive someone out of his or her mind."
noun
*1 : the sour juice of crab apples or of unripe fruit (as grapes or apples); also : an acid liquor made from verjuice
2 : acidity of disposition or manner
verjuice
from Anglo French for green and juice
verb
1 : deny, renounce
*2 : surrender, relinquish
abnegate
Latin root "negare" = "to deny"
adjective
1 : full of excessive talk : wordy
*2 : given to fluent or excessive talk : garrulous
loquacious
"loqui," a Latin verb meaning "to speak."
noun
: a written statement declaring publicly the intentions, motives, or views of its issuer
manifesto
derive ultimately from the Latin noun "manus" ("hand") and "-festus," a combining form that is related to the Latin adjective "infestus," meaning "hostile."
noun
*1 : the act or action of drinking
2 : the act or action of taking in or up : absorption
imbibition
Latin "imbibere," a verb whose meaning "to drink in" includes absorption of liquids, consuming drink, and appropriating ideas.
adjective
: lacking in candor; also : giving a false appearance of simple frankness : calculating
disingenuous
"ingenuus" is a Latin adjective meaning "native" or "freeborn" (itself from "gignere," meaning "to beget").
noun
1 a : migraine b : vertigo, dizziness
2 a : fancy, whim *b plural : low spirits
megrim
Latin and Greek speakers afflicted with a pain in one side of the head called their ailment "hemicrania" or "hçmikrania," from the Greek terms "hemi-," meaning "half," plus "kranion," meaning "cranium."
verb
: to celebrate with boisterous rejoicing and hilarious behavior
maffick
adjective
1 : marked by or suggestive of flashy vulgarity or crudeness
*2 : marked by a careless unconventionality : rakish
raffish
derives from the Middle English "raf," and it was being used for trash and refuse back in the 1400s; *like riffraff
noun
: a harsh rebuke
objurgation
Latin "objurgare" ("to scold or blame"), which was formed from "ob-" ("against") and "jurgare" ("to quarrel" or, literally, "to take to law"—in other words, "to bring a lawsuit"); "jur" means law in Latin***
verb
*1 intransitive sense : to raise trivial and frivolous objection
2 transitive sense : to raise trivial objections to
cavil
derives from the Latin verb "cavillari," meaning "to jest" or "to raise silly objections," which in turn derives from the Latin noun "cavilla," meaning "raillery."
adjective
*1 : supernatural, mysterious
2 : filled with a sense of the presence of divinity : holy
3 : appealing to the higher emotions or to the aesthetic sense : spiritual
numinous
from the Latin word "numen," meaning "divine will" or "nod" (it suggests a figurative nodding, of assent or of command, of the divine head).
noun
*1 : a worker who has learned a trade and works for another person usually by the day
2 : an experienced reliable worker or performer especially as distinguished from one who is brilliant or colorful
journeyman
verb:
intransitive senses : to do hard, menial, or monotonous work
transitive senses : to force to do hard, menial, or monotonous work
drudge
adjective
1 : seeking to avert disapproval : APOLOGETIC
2 : serving to deprecate : DISAPPROVING
deprecatory
Latin deprecatus, past participle of deprecari to avert by prayer, from de- + precari to pray -- more at PRAY; literally "to pray against"
n: one who is disapproved of or is held in contempt; informer; betrayer; nark, snitch, strikebreaker

intransitive verb: to turn informer, squeal
fink
adjective
1 : ghostly, mysterious, eerie, weird
*2 : suggesting superhuman or supernatural powers
uncanny
adj.:

"clever," "shrewd" or "prudent"
canny
noun
1 : fib
*2 : pretentious nonsense
taradiddle
origin unknown
adjective
: relating to or living on the bank of a natural watercourse or sometimes of a lake or tidewater
riparian
"river"—the Latin "riparius," a noun deriving from "ripa," meaning "bank" or "shore."
adjective
: of, relating to, or situated or growing on or near a shore especially of the sea
littoral
Etymology: Latin litoralis, from litor-, litus seashore
noun
1 : a sudden attack of illness, faintness, or nausea
2 : a sudden access of usually disturbing emotion (as doubt or fear)
*3 : a feeling of uneasiness about a point especially of conscience or propriety
qualm
adjective
1 a : of, relating to, or produced by lymph, lymphoid tissue, or lymphocytes b : conveying lymph
*2 : lacking physical or mental energy : sluggish
lymphatic
comes from Latin "lympha" ("water" or "water goddess"), which itself may be a modification of the Greek word "nymphç," meaning "nymph."
noun
: something that serves as a check or stop
kibosh
adjective
: marked by hot temper and easily provoked anger
irascible
Latin noun "ira," meaning "anger." From "ira," which is also the root of "irate" and "ire," came the Latin verb "irasci" ("to become angry"), which led to the French "irascible." *the "ir" does not mean "not"
noun
: any of various nonruminant mammals (as an elephant, a rhinoceros, or a hippopotamus) of a former group (Pachydermata) that have hooves or nails resembling hooves and usually thick skin; especially : elephant
pachyderm
Pachydermos" in Greek means literally "having thick skin" (figuratively, it means "dull" or "stupid"). It’s from "pachys," meaning "thick," and "derma," meaning "skin." ; it also means "callous" or "insensitive"
adjective
1 : of, relating to, or written in a simplified form of the ancient Egyptian hieratic writing
*2 : popular, common
3 : of or relating to the form of Modern Greek that is based on everyday speech
demotic
ha...Savage; The source of these words is the Greek word "dçmos," meaning "people."