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10 Cards in this Set

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list 5 steps to darwinian evolution.
1. all organisms must produce more offspring than can survive.
2. every individual must compete to survive.
3. individuals vary within a species.
4. best suited individual will survive.
5. survivors pass traits to offspring.
describe 3 ways fossils are formed.
ask butler
how is shift of white to black moth population an example of natural selection.
the black moths are better suited to survive in their environment and they are able to reproduce.
why are soft bodied animals rare in the fossil record?
ask butler
list three animals with bilateral/radial symmetry.
bilateral- fish, frogs, and crabs.
radial- sponges, sea stars, and sea urchins.
list 5 steps to darwinian evolution.
1. all organisms must produce more offspring than can survive.
2. every individual must compete to survive.
3. individuals vary within a species.
4. best suited individual will survive.
5. survivors pass traits to offspring.
describe 3 ways fossils are formed.
ask butler
how is shift of white to black moth population an example of natural selection.
the black moths are better suited to survive in their environment and they are able to reproduce.
why are soft bodied animals rare in the fossil record?
ask butler
list three animals with bilateral/radial symmetry.
bilateral- fish, frogs, and crabs.
radial- sponges, sea stars, and sea urchins.