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30 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
homophonic
Having or characterized by a single melodic line with accompaniment.
Pitch
The frequency of a note determining how high or low it sounds.
Phrase
A single line of music played or sung. A musical sentence.
Cadence
Closing of a phrase or section of music
Form
The structure of a piece of music.
Syllabic
a form of verse based on the number of syllables in a line rather than on the arrangement of accents or quantities.
Madrigal
A polyphonic song using a vernacular text and written for four to six voices.
Motet
A polyphonic composition based on a sacred text and usually sung without accompaniment.
Jongleur
singer of folk songs
Monophonic
Having a single melodic line.
Staff
A set of horizontal lines and intermediate spaces used in notation to represent a sequence of pitches, in modern notation normally consisting of five lines and four spaces.
Harmony
adding to the debth and richness of a melody.
Rhythm
The patterned, recurring alternations of contrasting elements of sound.
binary
form based on contrast, usually AABB.
Melismatic
A passage of several notes sung to one syllable of text, as in Gregorian chant.
interval
The distance between two tones
key
The pitch of a voice or other sound.
tempo
The rate of speed at which a musical compostion is performed
ternary
Composed of three or arranged in threes.
modes
Any of certain fixed arrangements of the diatonic tones of an octave, as the major and minor scales of Western music.
reformation
16th-century movement in Western Europe that aimed at reforming some doctrines and practices of the Roman Catholic Church and resulted in the establishment of the Protestant churches.
troubadour
One of a class of 12th-century and 13th-century lyric poets.
polyphonic
Music in which two or more melodies sound simultaneously.
melody
An arrangement of single tones in a meaningful sequence.
tonic
One of a class of poet-musicians flourishing in northern France in the 12th and 13th centuries, who composed chiefly narrative works, such as the chansons de geste, in langue d'oïl.
dynamics
Varying intensities of sound throughout a given musical composition. (Piano, Mezzo Piano, Forte, etc.)
plainchant
Any monophonic medieval liturgical music without strict meter and traditionally sung without accompaniment.
mass
Public celebration of the Eucharist in the Roman Catholic Church and some Protestant churches.
counter-reformation
A reformation intended to counter the consequences of a previous reformation.
trouvere
One of a class of poet-musicians flourishing in northern France in the 12th and 13th centuries, who composed chiefly narrative works, such as the chansons de geste, in langue d'oïl.