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12 Cards in this Set

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Plato

Q#2
Justice and the Leader
Plato (428 B.C. - 348 B.C.)

Opposed View: Thrasymachus: justice is what is interest of the strong.

Plato's View: Rulers act in the interests of their subjects.
Thomas Hobbes

Q#3
Self-Interest and Human Nature
Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679)

1) State of nature: war: must be restrained.
2) Give all power necessary to state to restrain.
3) My views: self interest can be "us interest"
Niccolo Machiavelli

Q#5
The Qualities of Princes
Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527)

(1) Machiavelli views humans as weak, cowardly, fickle, and selfish.

(2) Machiavelli paints a sly and manipulative leader as the most successful.

(3) I agree with Machiavelli in the context of his life (Florence late 15 and early 16 century turmoil). His methods still have merrit but not so extreme.
Ayn Rand

Q#4
Why Self-Interest Is Best
Ayn Rand, (1905-1982)

(1) All previous moral debate against mind of man.
(2) New value: actions taken out of self interest promote your survival -> in accordance with life.

(3) Leaders acting in self interest inspire the same in followers, but leaders' interest must be for their people. Only then can this work.
Aristotle

Q#6
Virtue Ethics
Aristotle (384 B.C. - 322 B.C.)

(1) Virtue = mean between 2 vices: 1 excess & 1 defficiency

(2) Virtue comes by right habituation

(3) Implications?: Leaders are grown through proper habituation.
Buddha

Q#7
The First Sermon and Synopsis of Truth
Buddha (563 B.C. 483 B.C.)

(1) 4 Noble truths: 1. suffering 2. desire creates suffering 3. there is a way to overcome suffering 4. Cessation through the 8 fold path.

(2) 8-fold path:
1. right understanding
2. right intention
3. right speech - honesty
4. right action - act not to hurt
5. right livelihood - honest means
6. right effort - sincere and judicious
7. right mindfullness
8. right concentration - focus

(3) aristotle and buddha both focus on creating harmony - relevant today
Gary Yukl

Q#1
Sources of Power and Influence

Sources:

1. Positional Power: formal athor, control of resour & reward,
control punish, control info

2. Personal Power: Epertise, Friendship & loyal, charisma
Bathsheba

Q#8
The Bathsheba Syndrome: The Ethical Failure of Successful Leaders

Dean Ludwig and Clinton Longnecker

(1) highly successful leaders often fail morally.
(2) success brings:
loss strategic focus
privileged access
inflated sense of manipulative...
(3) Balanced life helps avoid falling victim.
Q# 9,10, or 14 (all similar enough)
The Power of Unreasonable People
Elkington and Hartigan (2008)

(1) social entrpreneurs seek more than just monitory profit.
(2) social profit is seen as equal importance.
(3) social entrepreneurs identify specific pains or needs and fulfill them.
(4) example: hunger and education:

Hector Gonzalez: mexico, converted waste from dairy factory into food to distribute to poor.

John wood, former CEO MS, Room to read, provides books for underprivileged children (Nepal and Vietnam)
Q#11
The Power of Unreasonable People
Elkington and Hartigan (2008)

Funding sources:
Q#12
The Power of Unreasonable People
Elkington and Hartigan (2008)

10 great divides:

demographic
financial
nutritional
resource
environmental
health
gender
educational
digital
security

Use examples from Q# 9,10, and 14

Hector Gonzalez: mexico, converted waste from dairy factory into food to distribute to poor.

John wood, former CEO MS, Room to read, provides books for underprivileged children (Nepal and Vietnam)
Q#11
The Power of Unreasonable People
Elkington and Hartigan (2008)

3 Business Models:

1. leverage non-prof: goal direct beneficiaries to assume ownership
2. hybrid nonprofit: get goods and services to excluded populations
3. Social Business Ventures: drive transformational social and environmental change.



Sources of funding:

fishing in back pockets
raise funds from public
attracting help in kind
appealing to angels and foundations
tapping the government
marking sales and charging fees
franchising
creating partnership and joint ventures
pursuing venture capital
selling out (going public)