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54 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
alliteration
beginning several consecutive or neighboring words with the same sound
allusion
reference to a mythological or historical person place or thing
antithesis
direct juxtaposition of structurally parrallel words, phrases, or clauses for the purpose of contras
assonance
repetition of accented volwel sounds in a series of words
Consonance
repetition of a consonant sound within a series of words
Diction
word choice intended to convey a certain effect
figures of speech
imaginative comparison to produce images in a reader's mind, most common are simile, metaphor and personification
flashback
scene that interrupts the action of a word to show a previous event
foreshadowing
use of hints or clues ina narrative to suggest future action
hyperbole
outrageous exaggeration
imagery
appealing to the senses
irony
verbal irony, speaker says one thing while meaning the opposite, situational irony, situation turns out differently from what one would expect, dramatic iron occurs when a character says something that has different meanings from what he thinks it means though the audience understands it
setting
time and place
shift or turn
change or movement ina piece resulting from an epiphany
simile
comparison with like or as
sound devices
stylistic techniques that convey meaning through sound
structure
literary framework or organization of a literary selection
style
writer's manner of employing language
suspense
reader or audience uncertain or tense
symbol
object, person, place , or actions that stands for something larger than itself
syntax
arrangement of words and order of grammatical elements
theme
central message
tone
writer's or speaker's attitude toward a subject
understatement
opposite of hyperbole
slang
recently coined words
colloquial expressions
nonstandard often regional ways of using language
jargon
words and expressions characteristic of a particular trade
dialect
nonstandard subgroup of a language
concrete diction
words that describe physical qualities or conditions
abstract diction
language that denotes ideas, emotions, conditions, or concepts that are intangible
denotation
exact literal definition of a word
connotation
implicit rather then explicit meaning of a word and consists of suggestions, associations and emotional overtones attached to a word
parallel structure
repeating grammatical or structural similarity
rhetorical question
question that requires no answer
sentence patterns
declarative, imperative, exclamatory, simple, compound, cdcx, inverted, natural order, balanced and periodic sentences
omniscient pov
narrator knows all
limited omniscient pov
author knows everything about one character
objective pov
allows reader to make inferences through observation of dialogue and external action
first person pov
story seen through eyes of one character
metaphor
not using like or as
mood
atmosphere or predominant emotion
narration
telling of story in writing or speakin
onomatopeoia
words that mimic sounds they describe
oxymoron
form of paradox pair of opposite terms into a single unusual expression
paradox
occurs when elements of statemnet contradict each other
personification
inanimate object human characteristics
plot
sequence of events
point of view
perpspective from which a narrative is told
protagonist
central character
pun
play on words
repetition
repeating element of language
rhyme
repetition of sounds
sarcasm
verbal irony in which a person appears to be praising something but is actually insulting it
apostrophe
dead or absent are spoken to as if present and inanimate as if animate