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27 Cards in this Set

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adjective
*1 : pleasing to the ear
2 : agreeable, soothing
dulcet
Latin "dulcis," Anglo-French "douz," and Middle English "doucet," all meaning "sweet."
noun
*1 : the act or an instance of embezzling
2 : a failure to meet a promise or an expectation
defalcation
from the Latin word "falx," meaning "sickle" (a tool for cutting
noun
*1 : a loud arrogant boaster
2 a : empty boasting b : arrogant pretension : cockine
braggadicio
adjective
: lacking courage and resolution : marked by contemptible timidity
pusillanimous
Latin roots of this derisive adjective are "pusillus," meaning "very small" (and related to "pusus," meaning "boy") and "animus," which means "spirit" and is the ancestor to many words in our language, including "animal" and "animate."
noun
1 : a steplike arrangement
*2 a : one of a series of levels or grades in an organization or field of activity b : the individuals at such a level
echelon
traces back to "scala," a Late Latin word meaning "ladder" that was the ancestor of the Old French "eschelon," meaning "rung of a ladder." the French word (which is "échelon" in Modern French) came to mean "step," "grade," or "level.
noun
: left-hander; especially : a left-handed baseball pitcher
southpaw
noun
1 : nearness of blood : kinship
*2 : nearness in place or time : proximity
propinquity
its cousin "proximity" are related through the Latin root "prope," which means "near." That root gave rise to "proximus" (the parent of "proximity") "Proximus" is the superlative of "prope" and thus means "nearest," whereas "propinquus" simply means "near" or "akin,"
adjective
: beginning to come into being or to become apparent
incipient
Latin verb "incipere," which means "to begin."
adjective
: having or known by various names
polyonymous
from Greek. The "poly-" part means "many," and the "-onymous" part derives from the Greek word "onoma" or "onyma," meaning "name"
noun
1 : rigor, severity
2 a : roughness of surface : unevenness; also : a tiny projection from a surface b : roughness of sound
*3 : roughness of manner or of temper : harshness
asperity
Middle English by way of the Anglo-French word "aspreté," and ultimately derives from the Latin word "asper," which means "rough." This same Latin word also underlies the English word "exasperate" (in fact, you can see "asper" nestled in the midst of that word).
verb
*1 a : to inscribe or adorn with or as if with heraldic bearings or devices b : to inscribe (as heraldic bearings) on a surface
2 : celebrate, extol
emblazon
adjective
1 : wearing loose shoes
2 : shabby
*3 : careless, slovenly
slipshod
The word "shod" is the past tense form of the verb "to shoe"; meant "wearing loose shoes or slippers and later it was used to describe shoes that were falling apart
adverb
: in the past : formerly
ertswhile
comes from the Old English words "ær," meaning "early" (and also the source for the word "ere") and "hwÄ«l," which had much the same meaning as the modern words "while" and "time."
noun
: the quality or state of being gentle : meekness, tameness
mansuetude
derives from the Latin verb "mansuescere," which means "to tame." "Mansuescere" itself comes from the noun "manus" (meaning "hand") and the verb "suescere" ("to accustom" or "to become accustomed"). Unlike "manus," which has many English descendants (including "manner," "emancipate," and "manicure"), "suescere" has only a few English progeny. One of them is "desuetude" (meaning "disuse"), which comes to us by way of Latin "desuescere" ("to become unaccustomed"). Another is "custom," which derives via Anglo-French from Latin "consuescere" ("to accustom").
verb
transitive senses
1 : to entertain sumptuously : feast with delicacies
*2 : to give pleasure or amusement to
intransitive sense
: to feast oneself : feed
regale
from the French "régaler," which has the same meaning as "regale." The French verb goes back to Middle French "galer," which means "to have a good time," and to Old French "gale," meaning "pleasure." ("Gala," meaning "a festive celebration," is from the same source.) also has a history as a noun meaning "a sumptuous feast."
adjective
: cowardly, despicable
caitiff
evolved from the Anglo-French adjective "caitif," meaning "wretched, despicable." The French word in turn derived from the Latin "captivus," meaning "captive"—the shift from "captive" to "wretched" perhaps prompted by the perception of captives as wretched and worthy of scorn.
noun
*1 a : vigor and strength of spirit or temperament b : staying quality : stamina
2 : quality of temperament or disposition
mettle
simply a variant spelling of the word "metal"; came to be used mainly in figurative senses referring to the quality of someone's character
adjective
1 : resembling a rose especially in color
*2 : overly optimistic : viewed favorably
roseate
from the Latin adjective "roseus," and ultimately from the noun "rosa," meaning "rose."
adjective
1 : putting an end to or precluding a right of action, debate, or delay
*2 : expressive of urgency or command
3 : marked by arrogant self-assurance : haughty
peremptory
from Latin "perimere," which means "to take entirely" and comes from "per-" ("thoroughly") and "emere" ("to take").; related to "preemptive" meaning "marked by the seizing of the initiative" (as in "a preemptive attack").
noun
: a state or period of flourishing
florescence
out of the New Latin "florescentia," meaning "blossoming." ("New Latin" refers to the form of Latin still used by scientists to name and classify organisms.) related to the verb "florēre" ("to blossom or flourish") and rooted in the Latin noun "flos," meaning "flower."
verb
: to be extraordinarily proud : rejoice
kwell
derived from Yiddish "kveln," meaning "to be delighted," which, in turn, comes from the Middle High German word "quellen," meaning "to well, gush, or swell."
adjective
1 : exuding fragrance : aromatic
2 *a : full of a specified fragrance : scented b : evocative, suggestive
redolent
Latin verb "olēre" ("to smell") and is a relative of "olfactory" ("of, relating to, or connected with the sense of smell")
noun
1 : a strict disciplinarian
*2 : a person who stresses a rigid adherence to the details of forms and methods
martinet
• adjective
1 : uncontrollably noisy
*2 : stubbornly resistant to control : unruly
obsteperous
Latin preposition "ob," meaning "in the way," "against," or "toward," occurs as a prefix in many Latin and English words. plus "strepere," a verb meaning "to make a noise," so someone who is; literally making noise to rebel against something, much like a protesting crowd or an unruly child.
verb
*1 a : to grant or furnish often in a gracious or condescending manner b : to give by way of reply
2 : to grant as a privilege or special favor
vouchsafe
noun
*1 : a complete code of the laws of a country or system of law
2 : a treatise covering an entire subject
pandect
he Latin word "pandectae" is the plural of "pandectes," which means "encyclopedic work" or "book that contains everything." derives from the Greek "pandektēs" ("all-receiving"), from "pan-" ("all") and "dechesthai" ("to receive").
noun
: love of or enthusiasm for what is new or novel
neophilia
from Greek for "new" and for "love" or "liking-for"; it's opposite is "neophobia" meaning "a dread of or aversion to novelty."