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35 Cards in this Set

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v. to enrage
incense
adj
1. lazy: lethargic and not showing any interest or making any effort
2. medicine painless and slow to change: used to describe a disease or condition that is slow to develop or be healed, and causes no pain
indolent
From the late Latin stem indolent- “insensitive to pain,” from dolent- , present participle stem of dolere “to suffer pain.”
adjective

*1 : dressed with great care and elegance : well-groomed, sleek
2 : elegantly maintained or designed
soigne
from French, where it serves as the past participle of the verb "soigner," meaning "to take care of."
adj
disrespectful: showing an aggressive lack of respect in speech or behavior
insolent
From Latin insolens “unusual, arrogant,” from solere “to be accustomed.”]
noun

: an intimate and often exclusive group of persons with a unifying common interest or purpose
coterie
verb

: to give expression to emotion especially in acting
emote
adj.

acting on the spur of the moment, without considering the consequences; on impulse; moving with great force or energy; violent
impetuous
n
1. tiredness: a pleasant feeling of weariness or weakness
2. listlessness in speech or behavior: listlessness and indifference in speech or behavior
3. heaviness in atmosphere: an oppressive heaviness or sultriness in the air
langour
Latin languere “to be weak or faint.”
adj
1. dull: dull because lacking in character and lively qualities
2. flavorless: bland and without flavor
insipid
from late Latin insipidus “tasteless,” from sapidus “having a flavor.”
noun

: a steep mountainside gorge
couloir
from French, where it literally means "passage."
noun

1 : a group hired to applaud at a performance
*2 : a group of sycophants
claque
French borrowing that descends from the verb "claquer," meaning "to clap," and the noun "claque," meaning "a clap."
adjective

: marked by fearless resolution : valiant
doughty
from a related Old English word, "dohte," that meant "had worth."
adjective

1 : keen, sharp
2 : vigorously effective and articulate; also : caustic
3 *a : sharply perceptive : penetrating b : clear-cut, distinct
trenchant
from the Anglo-French verb "trencher," meaning "to cut," and may ultimately derive from the Vulgar Latin "trinicare," meaning "to cut in three."
noun

1 : the act or an instance of enjoining : order, admonition
*2 : a court order requiring a party to do or refrain from doing a specified act
injunction
from the Latin verb "injungere," which in turn derives from "jungere," meaning to "join." synonymn to enjoin
verb

: to annoy or attempt to influence by private talk
earwig
adj
discouraged: extremely unhappy and discouraged
Despondent
adjective

: of, relating to, or involving a confidence or trust: as a : held or founded in trust or confidence b : holding in trust c : depending on public confidence for value or currency
fiduciary
This words is all faithful to its origin — Latin "fidere," which means "to trust."
verb

1 : to press or urge with troublesome persistence
*2 : annoy, trouble
3 : to beg, urge, or solicit persistently or troublesomely
importune
noun

: the faculty or phenomenon of finding valuable or agreeable things not sought for; also : an instance of this
serendipity
n
1. appointment or period of appointment: the occupation of an official position, or the length of time a position is occupied (formal)


2. property-holding: the rights of a tenant to hold property, or the holding of property as a tenant

3. education human resources permanent status: the position of having a formal secure appointment until retirement, especially at an educational institution after working on a temporary or provisional basis
tenure
from, ultimately, Latin tenere “to hold;” like in Spanish tener "to have"
adjective

: marked by a tendency in favor of a particular point of view : biased
tendentious
derivative of the Medieval Latin "tendentia," meaning "tendency"
noun

: an adventurous, daring, or chivalric enterprise
emprise
synonymous to a quest; from the Anglo-French word "emprendre," meaning "to undertake."
verb

: to anticipate and prevent (as a situation) or make unnecessary (as an action)
obviate
from the Late Latin "obviare" (meaning "to meet or withstand") and the Latin "obviam," which means "in the way"
Synonyms: prevent, preclude, avert
adj
bad-tempered: bad-tempered, unfriendly, rude, and somewhat threatening
surly
: alteration of Middle English "sirly": lordly, imperious, from sir
adj.

3 a : favorable to growth or comfort : mild b : marked by or diffusing sympathy or friendliness

4 : displaying or marked by genius
genial
Latin genialis, from genius
noun

: a computer-related product that has been widely advertised but has not and may never become available
vaporware
the idea is like a fog, it is there but it never materializes
n
security device for protected software: a small hardware device that, when plugged into a computer, enables a specific copy-protected program to run, the program being disabled on that computer if the device is not present. The device is effective against software piracy.
dongle
adjective

1 : born under or influenced astrologically by the planet Saturn
2 a : cold and steady in mood : slow to act or change *b : of a gloomy or surly disposition c : having a sardonic aspect
saturnine
noun

1 plural : characteristic apparatus : trappings
2 a : the dress characteristic of an occupation or occasion — usually used in plural *b : clothes — usually used in plural
habiliment
verb

*1: to go quickly : hasten
2 : to cause (oneself) to go quickly
hie
from the even hoarier "hīgian," Old English for "to strive" or "to hasten."
adjective

1 a : suffused with light : luminous b : translucent
*2 : having full use of one's faculties : sane
3 : clear to the understanding : intelligible
lucid
derives (via the Latin adjective "lucidus," meaning "shining") from the Latin verb "lucēre," meaning "to shine." one's mind is as clear as the light that shines through it :)
noun

1 : an act or instance of putting something in writing or adapting it for publication
*2 : a work that has been adapted for publication : edition, version
redaction
from the Latin verb "redigere" ("to bring back" or "to reduce") which was formed by adding the prefix "red-" ("back") to "agere." "agere" is a Latin verb that means "to act, drive, lead, or do"
adjective

: conspicuous; especially : conspicuously bad
egregious
from the Latin word "egregius," meaning "distinguished" or "eminent."
noun

: an inclination or predisposition toward something; especially : a strong inherent inclination toward something objectionable
proclivity
from "clivus," the Latin word for "slope" related to propensity (uncontrollable inclination), predilection (attraction due to temperament or mood), and penchant (strong attraction towards)
verb

*1 : to enter by gradual steps or by stealth into the possessions or rights of another
2 : to advance beyond the usual or proper limits
encroach
the word derives from the Middle English "encrochen," which means "to get or seize" and whose Anglo-French predecessor "encrocher" was formed by combining the prefix "en-" ("in") with the noun "croche" ("hook").