Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/32

Click to flip

32 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
“I sometimes wished to have rosy cheeks, a straight nose, and small cherry mouth; I desired to be tall, stately and finely developed in figure; I felt it a misfortune that I was so little, so pale, and had features so irregular and so marked.
Jane Eyre
“Tall, fine bust, sloping shoulders; long, graceful neck, olive complexion: dark and clean: noble features: eyes rather like Mr. Rochester's: large and black, and as brilliant as her jewels. And then she had such a fine head of hair; raven black and so cunningly arranged: a crown of thick plats behind, and in the front, the longest, that glossiest curls I ever saw. She was dressed in pure white: an amber-colored scarf was passed over her shoulder and across her breast, tied at her side, and descending in on fringed edges below the knee. She wore an amber-colored flower too in her hair: it contrasted well with the jetty mass of her curls. Her face was like her mother’s: a youthful unforrowed likeness, same low brow, the same high features, and the same pride.”
Miss Ingram
_____ might be at that time some six or seven and thirty; she was a woman of robust frame, square shouldered and strong limbed, not tall, and though stout not obese; she had a somewhat large face, the under-jaw being much developed and very solid; her brow was low, her chin large and prominent, mouth and nose sufficiently regular; under her light eye-brows glimmered an eye devoid of ruth; her skin was dark and opaque, her hair neatly flaxen; her construction was sounds as a bell-illness never came near her; she was an exact, clever manager, her house household and tenantry were thoroughly under her control; her children, only. At times defied her authority and laughed it to scorn she dressed well, and had presence and port calculated to set of handsome attire.
Miss Reed
“who had a spoiled temper, a very acrid spite, a captious and insolent carriage, was universally indulged. Her beauty, her pink cheeks and golden curls, seemed to give delight to all who looked at her, and to purchase indemnity for every fault”.
Georgiana Reeds [child]
“The other day was as certainly _______: but not the _______ I remembered- the slim and fairy-like girl of eleven. This was a full blown , very plump damsel, fair was wax-work, with handsome and regular features, languishing blue eyes, and ringleted yellow hair. The hue of her dress was black too-but its fashion was so different from her sister’s-so much more flowing and becoming-it looked as stylish as the other’s punctual.
Georgiana Reed [adult]
“…Who was headstrong and selfish, was respected.”
Eliza Reed [child]
“Two young ladies appeared before me; one very tall, almost as tall as Miss Ingram-very thin too, with a sallow face and severe mien. The extreme plainness of a straight-skirted, black, stuff dress, a starched linen collar, hair combed away from the temples, and the nun-like ornament of a string of ebony beads and a crucifix. This I felt she was ______, though I could trace little resemblance to her former self in the elongated and colorless visage.
Eliza Reed [adult]
“A schoolboy of fourteen years old; four years older than I, for I was but ten; large and stout for his age, with a dingy and unwholesome skin; thick lineaments in a spacious visage, heavy limbs and large extremities. He gorged himself habitually at table, which made him bilious, and gave him a dim and bleared eye and flabby cheeks.”
John Reed
“His figure was enveloped in a riding cloak, fur collared, and steel clasped; its details were not apparent, but I traced the general points of the middle height, and considerable breadth of chest. He had a dark face, with stern features and a heavy brow; his eyes and gathered eyebrows looked ireful and thwarted just now; he was past youth, but had not reached middle age; perhaps he might be thirty five”
Mr. Rochester
“As I saw them with the spiritual eye, before I attempted to embody them, they were striking; but my hand would not second my fancy, and in each case it had wrought out but a pale portrait of the thing I had conceived.”
Mr. Rochester
“He lifted up the sable wave of hair which lay horizontally over his brow , and showed a solid enough mass of intellectual organs; but an abrupt deficiency where the suave sign of benevolence should have risen.”
Mr. Rochester
“My master’s colorless olive face, square, massive brow, broad and jetty eyebrows, deep eyes and strong features, firm, grim mouth…”
Mr. Rochester
“I looked up-a black pillar!-Such, at least, appeared to me at first sight, the straight, narrow, sable-clad shape standing erect on the rug; the grim face at the top was like a carved mask, placed above the shaft by way of capital. He has inquisitive gray eyes.”
Mr. Brocklehurst
“A tall, gentle man; but then I was very little; his features were large, and they and all the lines of his frame were equally harsh and prim.
Mr. Brocklehurst
“What a great nose! And what a mouth! And what prominent teeth!”
Mr. Brocklehurst
“His manor was polite, his accent, in speaking, struck me as being somewhat unusual-not precisely foreign, but still not all together English. His age might be about Mr. Rochester’s-between 30 and 40; his complexion was singularly sallow: otherwise he was a fine looking man, at first sight especially. On closer examination, you detected something in his facet hat displeased; or rather, that failed to please. His features were regular, but too relaxed; his eye was large and well cut, but the life looking out of it was a tame, vacant life-at least so I thought”
Mr. Mason
“_____, sitting as one of the dusty pictures on the wall keeping his eyes fixed on the page he perused, and his lips mutely seated-was easy enough to examine. He been a statue instead of a man, he could not have been easier. He was a young-perhaps from twenty eight to thirty-tall, ,slender; his face riveted the eye; it was like a Greek face, very pure in outline: quite a straight classic nose; quite an Athenian mouth and chin.”
St. John Rivers
“His eyes were large and blue, with brown lashes; his high forehead, colorless as ivory, was partially streaked over by careless locks of fair hair.”
St. John Rivers
“Thin face and sunken grey eye. When Miss Temple would speak of her fact would light with color and her face would become beautiful even more than Miss Temple’s herself, but not by fine color, long eyelashes, or penciled brow, but by movement and radiance. She had a large, mild, intelligent, and benign looking forehead.
Helen Burns
"Something in her own unique mind, had roused her powers within her. They woke, they kindled, first they glowed in the bright tint of her cheeck, which til an dhour I have never seen but pale and blookless; then they shone in the liquid luster of her eyes, which had suddenly acquired a beauty more singular than that of Miss Temple's-a beauty neither of fine color not long eyelash, nor penciled brow, but of meaning, of movement, of radiance. Then her soul sat on her lips, and language flowed, from what source I cannot tell; has a girl of 14 a heart large enough, vigourous enough to hold the swelling spring of pure, full, fervid, eloquence? Such was the characteristic of ______'s discourse on that, to me, memorable evening; her spirit seemed hastening to live within a very brief span as much as many live during a protracted existence."
Helen Burns
"Seen now, in broad daylight, she looked tall, fair, and shapely; brown eyes with a benignant light in their irids, and a fine penciling of long lashes round, relieved the whiteness of her large front; on each of her temples, her hair of a very dark brown, was clustered in round curls, according to the fashion of those times; when neither smooth bands nor long ringlets were in vogue; her dress also, in modeof the day, was in purple cloth relieve by a sort of Spanish trimming of black velvet; a gold watch sone at her girdle. Het the reader add, refined features: a complexion, if pale, clear; and a stately air and carriage."
Miss Temple
"She was quite a child, perhaps seven or eight years old, slightly built, with a pale small-featured face, and a redundancy of hair falling in curls to her waist."
Adele Varens
"My pupil was a lively child, who had been spoilt and indulged, and therefore was sometimes waywayrd; but as she was committed entirely to my care, and no injudicious interference from any quarter ever thwarted my plans for her improvement, she soon forgot her little freaks, and became obedient and teachable. She had no great talents, no marked traits of character, no peculiar development or feelings or taste which raised her one inch above the ordinary level of childhood but neither had she any deficiency or vice which sunk her below it."
Adele Varens
"The eldest Amy was rather little, Naive and child-like in her face and manner, and piquant in form; her white muslin dress and blue sash become her well."
Amy Eshton
"The second, Louisa, was taller and more elegant in figure; with a pretty face, and the French order minois chiffone"
Louisa Eshton
"Both sisters were as fair as lilies..."
The Eshton Sisters
"She seemed to me the prettiest, kindest being in the world...she must, I think, have been a good girl of natural capacity, for she was smart in all she did and had a remarkable knack of narrative. She was pretty too, if my recollections of her face and person are correct. I remember her a slim, young woman, with black hair, dark eyes, very nice features, and good, clear complexion; but she had a capricious and hasty temper, and indifferent ideas of principle and justice; still, such as she was, I preferred her to anyone else at Gateshead Hall"
Bessie
She was smart in all she did, and had a remarkable knack of narrative; she must have been a good girl of natural capacity.
Bessie
"Fearful and ghastly to me-of, sir. I never saw a face like it! It was a discolored face-it was a savage face. I wish I could forget the roll of the red eyes and the fearful blackened inflation of the lineaments.
Bertha Mason
This, sir, was purple: the lips were swelled and dark; the brow furrowed: the black eyebrows and widely raised over the bloodshot eyes."
Bertha Mason
"She was a big woman, in stature almost equaling her husband, and corpulent besides: she showed virile force in the contest-more than once she almost throttled him, athletic as he was."
Bertha Mason
"What it was, whether beast or human being, one could not at first sight tell, it groveled, seemingly, on all fours; it snatched and groveled like some strange wild animal: but it was covered with clothing; and quantity of dark, grizzled hair, wild as a mane, hid its head in and face."
Bertha Mason