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71 Cards in this Set

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pork
federal money that is distributed to various locatlities and states via grants and subsidies for various discrete projects (ex: transportation, research)- good for congresspeople
earmarked
money appropriated by the federal government (ex: universities such as tufts can get money 1.5 million)
logrolling
mutual aid among politicans who must vote on many items of economic importance in individual states and districts (importance of cooperation)
norm of reciprocity
everyone deserves a piece of the pie
cooperate!
problems with pork
it can distort policy, not give enuf money for substantial policy to be determined, diffused costs
people love their congressperson
champions of district thru pork, constituent service
but they hate congress
seen as overspending waste, inefficient, budget deficits
name recall
being able to remember a politician's name- they want name recall over name recognition becuase then they're in your mind
name recognition
being able to recognize a name when you see it.
monopolized support
help that only congresspeople can give to their constituents (ex: help with immigration, housing, social security)
issue attention cycle
ex: columbine--> gun control laws
the turkey factor
most incumbents face losers
redristricting
redrawing the lines according to the amount of representatives are allowed in the state after the reapportionment process
reapportionment process
states are reallocated their representatives so states have equal representation in the House
rules committee
tacks on a rule to every bill that determines the terms of debate, can amendments be added, etc
closed rule
no amendments are allowed
germaneness rule
amendments have to relate to the legislation (ie: global warming bill can't have money for iraq war attached)
unlimited debate
senate
unanimous consent
everyone has to agree to the terms of the debate and if doesn't agree, it's a hold
cloture
can stop a filibuster with 60% of the votes
pocket veto
a bill can die if a president holds onto a bill, doesn't sign it, and congress ends, so congress can't override the veto
expansionist
generally new to congress, concerned with the district bc seeking to expand electoral base
protectionist
have been around congress, more involved in dc, seek to keep supporters with them
reelection committes
ex: energy/natural resources esp for Western states bc so much federally owned land
ideological committees
generally electorally safe, show partisan/ideological side: judiciary committee
power committees
major institutional prerogative, want power and influence: ex: rules comm
Ways and Means
house committee that does tax legislations, very important
Appropriations
funding fo different programs has to be authorized by this comm
coattails
the idea that the president's election helps to elect those in congress of same party
Office of Congressional Relations
the president's lobbyists to congress
inductive decision making
use details to make policy
deductive decision making
start with big ideas and policy is produced from those
formalistic
assign different tasks to each assistant and everyone comes back w/ reports and make a reasoned decision
competitive
pit advisors against each other so all points of view are heard, but there's a lot of conflict
cooperative
establish teams to work together
CREEP
committee to reelect the president... aka nixon
archibald cox
nixon's special prosecutor, who nixon then fired
executive priveldge
nixon claimed that he had the right to privacy, etc, bullshit bc he was the pres and didn't have to give anyone the tapes of recorded private conversations
US v Nixon
nixon had to turn over the tapes, but yeah, incriminating and so he resigned bc otherwise would be impeached
administrative discretion
bills provide broad outlines and congress charges an agency to fill in the gaps; delegation of authority
Federal register
publishes the rules and regulations issued by various agencies daily
executive orders
what bush wants to tell the world
comment period
people can make comments about bureaucratic regulations
rulemaking authority
the ability fo a bureaucracy to act in a legislative way- it issues a set of rules and regualtions to be followed
adjudicatory authority
act in a more judicial way, is an individual/group operating within a law?
iron triangles/subgovernments
congressmembers, department, interest group--> form a strong coalition where mostly just winners
stay
justice has the power to freeze an execution in their area
riding circuit
a justice's area that he/she dominates
solicitor general
represents the government in a cas-- the leading attorney
judicial activism
constitution is a living document that needs to adapt to the times (liberalish)
judicial restraint
the court shouldn't make policy becuase it's not a democratic institution (conservativeish)
Marbury v. Madison
look up!!!!!!!!!
judicial review
the right to evaluate and invalidate laws in violation of the constitution
writ of certioria
the court will hear the case
rule of 4
4 justices have to agree to hear the case
standing
have to be directly involved in the case
stare decisis
let the old decision stand, try not to mess around with history too much, otherwise it gets messy
group
a set of people with common characteristcs, interests, or purposes
organization
some subset of a group that works to further the goals of the group
free rider problem
people in a group have no incentive to be part of an organization's activities if they will benefit from the activities whether or not they join
material benefits
ex: insurance plans, access to clubs, tax help
solidary benefits
meet with people that share the same intersts ex: sierra club singles hikes
purposive benefits
get a warm and fuzzy feeling from joinging a group
PAC
political action committee have to join to donate large sums of $
bundling
collect a lot of money and give it to the candidate, but candidate gets the money with a message and gets around PAC rules
honoraria
receive money for speaking for a public event, for example. ussualy donate the money
standing
have to be directly involved in the case
stare decisis
let the old decision stand, try not to mess around with history too much, otherwise it gets messy
group
a set of people with common characteristcs, interests, or purposes
organization
some subset of a group that works to further the goals of the group
free rider problem
people in a group have no incentive to be part of an organization's activities if they will benefit from the activities whether or not they join