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115 Cards in this Set

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Multisourcing
A combination of professional services, mission-critical support, remote management, and hosting services that are offered to customers in any combination needed.
Nearshore outsourcing
Contracting an outsourcing agreement with a company in a nearby country.
Offshore outsourcing
Using organizations from developing countries to write code and develop systems.
Onshore outsourcing
The process of engaging another company within the same country for services.
Outsourcing
An arrangement by which one organization provides a service or services for another organization that chooses not to perform them in-house.
Vertical marketplace
Provides products that are specific to trading partners in a given industry.
Systematic sourcing
Buying through prenegotiated contracts with qualified suppliers.
Spot sourcing
Buying commodity-like products that are transaction-oriented and rarely involve a long-term or ongoing relationship between buyers and sellers.
Seller model
The supplier hosts value-added services on its Web site such as suppliers' product catalog and customers' order information.
Reintermediation
Using the Internet to reassemble buyers, sellers, and other partners in a traditional supply chain in new ways.
Pure play
An Internet retailer that has no physical store, such as Expedia.com and Amazon.com.
Online broker
Intermediaries between buyers and sellers of goods and services.
Marketplace model
Allows a virtually infinite number of businesses to transact electronically with minimal cost.
Market makers
Intermediaries that aggregate three services for market participants.
Longer term relationship model
For items requiring a high degree of planning between buyers and sellers either in the design stage or in fulfillment.
Intermediary
Agents, software, or businesses that bring buyers and sellers together that provide a trading infrastructure to enhance e-business.
Horizontal marketplace
Connects buyers and sellers across many industries, primarily by simplifying the purchasing process.
E-shop (e-store or e-tailer)
A version of a retail store where customers can shop at any hour of the day without leaving home or office.
E-procurement
The B2B purchase and sale of supplies and services over the Internet.
E-portal
A single gateway through which to gain access to all the information, systems, and processes used by stakeholders of an organization.
English auction
The highest bid wins.
E-marketplace
Interactive business communities providing a central market space where multiple buyers and suppliers can engage in e-business activities.
E-mall
Consists of a number of e-shops, which serves as a gateway through which a visitor can access other e-shops.
E-government
Involves the use of strategies and technologies to transform government(s) by improving the delivery of services and enhancing the quality of interaction between the citizenconsumer within all branches of government(s).
E-channel
Web-based business channels.
E-business model
An approach to conducting electronic business through which a company can become a profitable business on the Internet.
E-business
The conducting of business on the Internet, not only buying and selling, but also serving customers and collaborating with business partners.
Content provider
Companies that use the Internet to distribute copyrighted content, including news, music, games, books, movies, and many other types of information.
Autonomic computing
A self-managing computing model named after, and pattnervous system.
Computer simulation
Complex systems, such as the U.S. economy, can be modeled by means of mathematical equations and different scenarios can be run against the model to determine "what if" analysis.
Digital ink (or electronic ink)
Technology that digitally represents handwriting in its natural form.
Digital paper (or electronic paper)
Any paper that is optimized for any type of digital printing.
Historical analysis
The study of historical events in order to anticipate the outcome of current developments.
Radio frequency identification (RFID)
Technologies using active or passive tags in the form of chips or smart labels that can store unique identifiers and relay this information to electronic readers.
RadioPaper
A dynamic high-resolution electronic display that combines a paper-like reading experience with the ability to access information anytime, anywhere.
Teleliving
Using information devices and the Internet to conduct all aspects of life seamlesslyuser's Internet connection in the background without their.
Trend analysis
The examination of a trend to identify its nature, causes, speed of development, and potential impacts.
Trend monitoring
Trends viewed as particularly important in a specific community, industry, or sector are carefully monitored, watched, and reported to key decision makers.
Trend projection
When numerical data is available, a trend can be plotted on graph paper to display changes through time and into the future.
Virtual assistant (VA)
A small program stored on a PC or portable devide that monitors e-mails, faxes, messages, and phone calls.
Analysis phase
Analyzing end-user business requirements and refining project goals into defined functions and operations of the intended system.
Business requirement
The detailed set of business requests that the system must meet in order to be successful.
Change control board (CCB)
Responsible for approving or rejecting all change requests.
Change management system
Includes a collection of procedures to document a change request and define the steps necessary to consider the change based on the expected impact of the change.
Commercial off-the shelf (COTS)
A software package or solution that is purchased to support one or more business functions and information systems.
Computer-aided software engineering (CASE)
Software suites that automate systems analysis, design, and development.
Critical success factor (CSF)
A factor that is critical to an organization's success.
Data flow diagram (DFD)
Illustrates the movement of information between external entities and the processes and data stores within the system.
Data model
A formal way to express data relationships to a database management system (DBMS)
Design phase
Involves describing the desired features and operations of the system including screen layouts, business rules, process diagrams, pseudo code, and other documentation.
Development phase
Involves taking all of the detailed design documents from the design phase and transforming them into the actual system.
Entity relationship diagram (ERD)
A technique for documenting the relationships between entities in a database environment.
Feasibility study
Determines if the proposed solution is feasible and achievable from a financial, technical, and organizational standpoint.
Feature creep
Occurs when developers add extra features that were not part of the initial requirements.
Graphical user interface (GUI)
The interface to an information system.
GUI screen design
The ability to model the information system screens for an entire system using icons, buttons, menus, and submenus.
Help desk
A group of people who respond to internal system user questions.
Implementation phase
Involves placing the system into production so users can begin to perform actual business operations with the system.
Joint application development (JAD)
A session where employees meet, sometimes for several days, to define or review the business requirements for the system.
Maintenance
The fixing or enhancing of an information system.
Maintenance phase
Involves performing changes, corrections, additions, and upgrades to ensure the system continues to meet the business goals.
Modeling
The activity of drawing a graphical representation of a design.
Online training
Runs over the Internet or off a CD-ROM.
Planning phase
Involves establishing a high-level plan of the intended project and determining project goals.
Process modeling
Involves graphically representing the processes that capture, manipulate, store, and distribute information between a system and its environment.
Requirements definition document
Contains the final set of business requirements, prioritized in order of business importance.
Scope creep
Occurs when the scope of the project increases.
Sign-off
The system users' actual signatures indicating they approve all of the business requirements.
Systems development life cycle (SDLC)
The overall process for developing information systems from plathrough implementation and maintenance.
Test condition
The detailed steps the system must perform along with the expected results of each step.
User documentation
Highlights how to use the system.
Workshop training
Set in a classroom-type environment and led by an instructor.
Change control board (CCB)
Responsible for approving or rejecting all change requests.
Change management
A set of techniques that aid in evolution, composition, and policy management of the design and implementation of a system.
Change management system
Includes a collection of procedures to document a change request and define the steps necessary to consider the change based on the expected impact of the change.
Critical path
A path from the start to the finish that passes through all the tasks that are critical to completing the project in the shortest amount of time.
Dependency
A logical relationship that exists between the project tasks, or between a project task and a milestone.
Gantt chart
A simple bar chart that depicts project tasks against a calendar.
PERT (Program Evaluation and Review Technique) chart
A graphical network model that depicts a project's tasks and the relationships between those tasks.
Project
A temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product or service.
Project deliverable
Any measurable, tangible, verifiable outcome, result, or item that is produced to complete a project or part of a project.
Project exclusion
Products, services, or processes that are not specifically a part of the project.
Project management
The application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities in order to meet or exceed stakeholder needs and expectations from a project.
Project manager
An individual who is an expert in project planning and management, defines and develops the project plan, and tracks the plan to ensure all key project milestones are completed on time.
Project milestone
Represents key dates when a certain group of activities must be performed.
Project objective
Quantifiable criteria that must be met for the project to be considered a success.
Project plan
A formal, approved document that manages and controls project execution.
Project product
A description of the characteristics the product or service has undertaken.
Project risk
An uncertain event or condition that, if it occurs, has a positive or negative effect on a project objective(s).
Project scope
Defines the work that must be completed todeliver a product with the specified features and functions.
Risk management
The process of proactive and ongoing identification, analysis, and response to risk factors.
Agile methodology
A form of XP, aims for customer satisfaction through early and continuous delivery of useful software components.
Project management
The application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities in order to meet or exceed stakeholder needs and expectations from a project.
Business requirement
The detailed set of business requests that the system must meet in order to be successful.
Mobile commerce
The ability to purchase goods and services through a wireless Internet-enabled device.
IT infrastructure
Includes the hardware, software, and telecommunications equipment that, when combined, provide the underlying foundation to support the organization's goals.
Disruptive technology
A new way of doing things that initially does not meet the needs of existing customers.
Electronic tagging
A technique for identifying and tracking assets and individuals via technologies such as radio frequency identification and smart cards.
Extreme programming (XP) methodology
Breaks a project into tiny phases, and developers cannot continue on to the next phase until the first phase is complete.
Waterfall methodology
A sequential, activity-based process in which each phase in the SDLC is performed sequentially from planning through implementation and maintenance.
Telematics
Blending computers and wireless telecommunications technologies with the goal of efficiently conveying information over vast networks to improve business operations.
Systems development life cycle (SDLC)
The overall process for developing information systems from planning and analysis through implementation and maintenance.
Sustaining technology
Produces an improved product customers are eager to buy, such as a faster car or larger hard drive.
Rapid application development (RAD) (also called rapid prototyping) methodology
Emphasizes extensive user involvement in the rapid and evolutionary construction of working prototypes of a system to accelerate the systems development process.
Prototype
A smaller-scale representation or working model of the user's requirements or a proposed design for an information system.
Project management software
Supports the long-term and day-to-day management and execution of the steps in a project.
E-business
The conducting of business on the Internet, not only buying and selling, but also serving customers and collaborating with business partners.
E-business model
An approach to conducting electronic business through which a company can become a profitable business on the Internet.
E-commerce
The buying and selling of goods and services over the Internet.
Electronic marketplace (e-marketplace)
Interactive business communities providing a central market space where multiple buyers and suppliers can engage in e-business activities.
Mobile commerce (M-commerce)
The ability to purchase goods and services through a wireless Internet-enabled device.
Insourcing
A common approach using the professional expertise within an organization to develop and maintain the organization's information technology systems.
Outsourcing
An arrangement by which one organization provides a service or services for another organization that chooses not to perform them in-house.
Business process outsourcing (BPO)
The contracting of a specific business task, such as payroll, to a third-party service provider.
Offshore outsourcing
Using organizations from developing countries to write code and develop systems.