Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/112

Click to flip

112 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
accent
In poetry, accent applies especially to vowels, and its recurrence produces a rhythmical effect.
allegory
A story told in symbolical language; an extended metaphor.
alliteration
near each other, two or more words beginning with the same or similar sounds. "The silence of the sea."
anachronism
placing an event, person, or thing in the wrong historical period. Julius Ceasar: "Their hats are pulled about their eyes."
analogy
to picture the unfamiliar in terms of the familiar. Inference that if two things agree in some respects, they will agree in others.
anonymous
of unknown authorships. Anon
apostrophe
a variety of personification, in which the thing personified is addressed directly. Macbeth to dagger: "Come, let me touch thee."
appendix
supplement. Matter added to a book
archaic
antiquated, old-fashioned; esp. words no longer in common use.
atmosphere
the general pervasive feeling aroused by materials in a piece of writing; setting, characters, theme, ect.
autobiography
story of a person's life, written by the person himself
ballad
a short narrative poem or song that tells a story in a direct, simple manner
bard
formerly, one who composed and sang; today, any poet
biography
narrative of a person's life, written by one who knew the person well either by actual acquaintance or through careful research
blank verse
unrhymed verse, especially unrhymed iambic pentameter. "Thanatopsis," Shakespeare's plays.
burlesque
to make a serious subject seem funny or ridiculous, or to treat small and trivial matters as if they were important. Similar to satire but less bitter
cadence
rhythm resulting from a particular arrangement of words
caricature
distortion by exaggeration of parts or characteristics
characterization
indication or delineation of the distinctive, typical attributes of a person to distinguish him from the author
chorus
Speakers or singers used to commment on action of drama, masque, etc.
Chronological
relation of events in order of their occurrence
classic
A literary work of highest class and acknowledged excellence.
cliche
A phrase which has lost its force because of continual use. "Sickening thud."
climax
the point at which the highest peak of interest or emotion is reached
coincidence
accidental coming together of certain events
colloquial
pertains to friendly conversation or writing; unsuited to formal communication
comedy
light, amusing drama; happy ending is typical
conceit
(n) Fanciful imagining of impossible situations between mortals and immortals. Elizabethan poetry.
conflict
Struggle of opposing forces. Between persons, groups, man and nature, within the individual
contemporary
the works of a living person, occurring at the same time
conventional
governed by generally aCCEPTED standards of customs, usage; contrast to original.
couplet
two consecutive rhyming lines
denouement
final resolution, or untying of plot
dialect
local or provincial form of language not recognized as standard
drama
a play. dramatic art, literature, or affairs
dramatic irony
situation in which a character is unaware of facts known to other characters, audience, or readers
elegy
a lyric poem, mornful,, plaintive, expressing gentle sadness as opposed to grief. A lament for the dead.
epic
a long narrative poem written in a noble, dignified style, typically relating deeds of great hero.
epigram
a short saying, in prose and poetry, expressing a single thought in witty pointed language.
episode
a separate incident in a larger piece of fiction
essay
a composition intendedd to explain something;
fable
a narration enforcing some useful truth; esp. one in which animals speak and act like human beings. Aesop
fantasy
supernatural type science fiction. Highly imaginative type of prose or poetry
farce
a humorous play in which plot and incident are greatly exaggerated.
fictitious
pretended, imaginary; not genuine
figurative language
use of words apart from their literal meaning to add beauty, originality, or force.
figure of speech
nonliteral use of words which usually suggest a comparison or help reader to form a mental pictrue. simile, metaphor, hyperbole
flashback
method of narration which moves backward and forward in time. Opposed to chronological
foot
unit of measurement in verse; usually one accented syllable and one or more accented syllabels
hackneyed
comomon place, trite
hyperbole
exaggeration for emphasis without intention of deception. I've told you a million times
idealist
one who idealizes, a visionary, dreamer
idiom
the language peculiar to or charactersict of a people, commmunity, a class
imagery
word pictures, usually containing figures of speech.
imagists
a group of poets who believed poems should present images, or word pictures, Amy Lowell
internal rhyme
rhyme within a line
legend
a stroy coming down from the past, usually not verifiable
limerick
a nonsense poem of five lines. Lines 1,2,5 and 3,4
literal
true to fact not exaggerated folloin tthe exact words
local color
presentation of the peculiarities of a particular locality and its inhabitants. Mark Twarin, Bret Harte
lyric
of poetry that which the writer expresses his own thought or feeling or mood generally composed in stanzas
manuscript
a written or typewritten documetn of any kind.
melodrama
a romantic, violent, or sensational drama in which these effects-romance, violence, sensationalistm-are used without adequate reason (logical meaningful, violence is not melo)
metaphor
figure of speech one thing is said to be another because of a quality the two shares
meter
the pattern of a verse
metonymy
figure of speech in which a part is used to represent the whole
monologue
oral or written composition express ideas of one person only. soliliquy
mood
the tone or feeling that prevails in a piece of literature
muses
in classical mythology, the goddesses who presided over song, poetry
myth
primitive stories of explanation,m involve gods demigods, origin, religion, custonms
narrative
anaccount a tale a story. Also, that part of a story involving explanations, setting
naturalism
similar to realism except that it concentrates on unhappy, unlovely aspects of life. Crane. Dreiser Steinbeck
novel
a distinct literary tyype of considerable length, involving characters, plot and setting
ode
a lyric poem full of novel feeling expressed with dignity.
parable
a story with rather obvious symbolic meaning from which a moral lesson is to be drawn. Jesus
paradox
a form of irony in which something that is apparently untrue proves on examination to be true.
paraphrase
to givbe meaning of a passage in other language or words
parody
writing in imitation of another
pastoral
literatuire that deals with the lives of shepherd, or of idealistically happy, peaceful, untrouble, country people.
pathos
the sense of pity
poetic justice
the effective operation of justice with due punishing of vice and due reward of virtue
poetry
actually, a higher type of verse. Language used as rhythmical, usually metrical, and adapted to arouse the feelings and imagination. Rhyme is not necessary.
point of view
focus of narration. Usually refers to the mind through which the material of the story is presented
plant
something deliberately placed or mentioned by thbe author the significance of which becomes evident later. (See foreshadowing. mystery and murder stories.
plot
the structure, framwork or plan of action in fiction
precis
a brief summary of essential points, statements, or facts
preface
introduction, prologue, forward
prosody
the science or art of versification(change from prose to metrical form)
prose
the ordinary language in speaking and writing. Opposed to verse and poetry
protagonist
active participatn in dram, novel, or story main character
prototype
the original form or general model after which anytthing is copied
pun
a play of words which have the same sounds but different meaning.s I saw a kitchen sinck, a horse fly.
realism
representation of life just as it is, without idealization
refrain
a phrase or verse that is repeated at intervals, usually at the end of a stanza
repetition
a poetic device in which a word, phrase, line or stanza is deliberately repeated.
requiem
a sad song or chant which is in reality a prayer for the repose of the dead
rhyme
repetition of a final sound containing a stressed vowel after a different consonant sound
rhyme scheme
the arrangement of rhyming lines, abcd, abbaabbacdecd
rhythm
swing or movement of poetry or prose gained through a particular arrangement of words and phrases
romance
opposed to realism. Any fictitious or wonderful tale in which the real or commonplace is made beautiful by the imagination. Also writing in which the interest lies in adventure, surprising incdient, unfamiliar places
sarcasm
the use of bitter, caustic, or stinging remarks expressing contempt often by ironical statement
satire
writing which ridicules customs or people. Gulliver's Travels
sentimentality
emotional response in excess of the occasion, which has not been prepared for in the story.
setting
the physical background against which a piece of writing takes place
simile
figure of speech. Two things or ideas having one or more charactreistics in commone are compared by means of such words as like and as
sonnet
a verse form consisting of 14 lines and usually dealing with a single unified thought. Wordsworth
surprise ending
an ending of a story which comes with some sense of shock to the reader
symbolism
the use of objects, characters or incidents which stand for or suggest something else
synopsis
abridgement, condensed statement; summary of resume
theme
the "point" or meaning of a story or novel
tone
a sub-division of atmosphere. Actually, the author's attitude toward what is being presentded
understatement
a form of irony. Saying less than the occasion would warrant