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24 Cards in this Set

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Hildegaard von Bingen
Medieval: 12th Century: Columba Aspexit;
chant dedicated to St. Maximus, monophony, plainchant, soloist and chorus together, poem, symbolic nature of images (Dante's animals)
texture
refers to the numberof voices and melodies
form
repetition;
a chant is formless because it changes with each new note
Saltarello
Medieval: 14th Century: anonymous;
dadnce piece, homophony, form, 3 sections and the first one is a refrain repeated 8 times
Josquin
Renaissance: 1502: Ave Maria;
motet, rich (close) polyphony, religious choral music, "Hail Mary," mostly polyphony with some homophony for variation
Weelkes
Renaissance: 1603: "As Vest Was from Latmos Hill Descending"
madrigal, text painting, from collection of madrigals written in honor of Queen Elizabeth (Triumphs of Oriana)
Handel
Baroque: 1733: "Fammi Combattere"
opera aria, melody with accompaniment, ritornello, recitative, from opera Orlando, sung by castrated man
aria
one person sings about how he/she feels, like a soliloquy
recitative
talk and sing at same time
ritornello
instrumental part between verses
opera
introduces new texture called melody with accompaniment
Bach
Baroque: 1730: Fugue in G-Minor
fugue, entrances of melody with interruptions of episodes, starts with exposition (intro of all 4 voices), episode always made up of sequence, subject (soprano) versus countersubject (other 3 voices), pedal points in bass voice
sequence
repetition in ascending or descending pitches
pedal point
bass voice holds note for long time
subject vs. countersubject
main melody versus back-up
episode
segments of ccountermelody repeated in sequence
Mozart
Classical: 1788: Symphony #40
first movement in sonata form, 2 tonal (melodic areas) and the second is very difference from the first and is slower and sweeter, bridge, texture is melody with accompaniment, orchestra, tonal color (timbre), development is polyphonic, recapitulation changes in key signature and has a longer, more developed bridge and has a sadder second area
sonata
exposition, development, recapitulation
timbre
tonal color, the different sounds of different instruments and pitches
bridge
separates two areas in the sonata's exposition
development
alters primary melody in timbre, tempo, texture, and melodic range
recapitulation
replays exposition with slight variations intended to magnify the drama of the music
stretto
closely overlapping melody in sequence
classical music
named so because it returns to the balance, proportion, and order of Greece