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7 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
"I do not know, my Lord, what I should think"...

-Ophelia
Dependency on men (particularly her father Polonius).
"Think yourself a baby"...

-Polonius
Demonstrating dependency,
"My Lord, my Lord, I have been so affrighted"...

-Ophelia
Weakness of character.
"Get thee to a nunnery"

-Hamlet
To Ophelia. For cleansing? Or to save her from being corrupted. A part of Hamlet's antic disposition, however arguably, his madness is genuine when thinking about women/sex/infidelity.
"My most seeming-virtuous Queen"...

"But Virtue, as it never will be moved..."

-Ghost
Similar to Iachimo, who uses comparable metaphors when he is accusing Posthumus of deserting Imogen for prostitutes. Stresses the corrupt nature of the Queen, who is supposed to be the figure-head for everything good.
"These words like daggers enter in my ears"...

-Queen
Ironic, as she is envisaging Hamlet killing her through the ears, just like how Claudius killed King Hamlet (by pouring poison in his ear).
"Great haste"

-Hamlet
Used to describe Gertrude's marriage to Claudius.