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172 Cards in this Set

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disclaim
disown; renounce claim to. If I grant you this priviledge, will you disclaim all other rights?
discerning
mentall quick and observant; having insight. Though no genius, the star was sufficiently discerning to distinguish her true friends from the countless phonies who flattered her discern v. discernment N
discernible
distinguishab;e' perceivable. The ships in the harbor were not discernible in the fog
disburse
pay out. When you disburse money on the company's behalf, be sure to get a receipt
disband
dissolve; disperse. The chess club disbanded after its diastrous initial season
disavowal
denial; disclaiming. The novelist James was controversial both for his earlysupport of commuism and for his subsequent disavowa; of it after a visit to the Soviet Union. disavow. v
disarray
disorderly or untidy state. After the New Year's party. the once orderly house was in total disarray
disapprobation
disapproval; condemnation. The conservative father viewed his daughter's radical boyfriend with disapprobation
disaffected
disloyal. ONce the most loyal of BRadley's supporters, Senator Moynihan found himself becoming increasingly disaffected
disabuse
correct a false impression; undeceive. I will attempt to disabuse you of your impression of my client's guilt; i know he is innocent
dirge
lament with music. THe funeral dirge stirred us to tears
dire
disastrous. American Red Cross have to work in the mid of dire
diorama
life-size, three dimentsional scene from nature or history. Because they dramatically pose actual stuffed animals against realistic painted landscapes, the dioramas at the Museum of Natural History particularly impress high school biology students
dingy
dull; not fresh, cheerless. Refusing to be depressed by her dingy studio apartment, Bea spent the weekend polishing the floors and window and hanign bright posters on the walls
din
continued loud noise. The din of the jack hammers outside the classroom window drowned out the lecturer's voice
diminution
lessening; reduction in size. Old Jack was as sharp at eighty as he had been at fifty; increasing age led to no diminution of his mental acuity
dilute
make less concentrated; reduce in strength
diligence
steadiness of effot; persistnet hard work. her employers were greatly impressed by her diliggence and offered her a partnership in the firm
dilettante
aimless follower of the arts, amateur; dabbler. According to Turgenev, without painstaking work, any writer or artist remains a dilettante. In an age of increasing professionalism, the terms amateur and dilettante have taken on negative contions they did not originally possess.
dilemma
problem; choice of two unsatisfactory alternatives. In this dilemma, he knew no one to whom he could turn for advice.
dilatory
tending to delay; intentionally delayiing. If you are dilatory in paying your bills, your credit rating may suffer.
dilate
expand. In the dark, the pupils of your eyes
dilapidated
ruined because of neglect. The dilapidated old building needed far more work than just a new coat of paint. Dilapidation
digression
wandering away from the subject. Nobody minded when Professor Renoir's lectures wandered away from their official theme; his digressions were always more fasinating than the topic of the day. digress v
diffuse
wordy; rambling spread out (like a gas). If you pay authors by the word, you tempt them to produce diffuse manuscripts rather than brief ones.
diffidence
shyness. You must overcome your idfidence if you intend to become a salesperson
die
device for stamping or impressing; mld. In coining pennies, workers at the old mint squeezed sheets of softened copper between two dies.
didactic
teaching; instructional. Pope's lengthy poem An Essay on Man is too didactic for my taste; i dislike it when poets turn preachy and moralize. didacticism
dictum
authoritative and weighty statement; saying maxim. University adminstrations still follow the old dictum 'publish or perish'. they don't care how good a teacher you are; if you don't publish enough papers, you're out of a job
dichotomy
split; branching into two parts (especially contradictory ones). Willie didn't know how to resolve and the dichotomy between his ambition to go to college and his childhood longing to run away and join the circus. Then he heard about Ringling Brothers Circus college, and he knew he'd found his school
diminution
lessening; reduction in size. Old Jack was as sharp at eighty as he had been at fifty; increasing age led to no diminution of his mental acuity
dilute
make less concentrated; reduce in strength
diligence
steadiness of effot; persistnet hard work. her employers were greatly impressed by her diliggence and offered her a partnership in the firm
dilettante
aimless follower of the arts, amateur; dabbler. According to Turgenev, without painstaking work, any writer or artist remains a dilettante. In an age of increasing professionalism, the terms amateur and dilettante have taken on negative contions they did not originally possess.
dilemma
problem; choice of two unsatisfactory alternatives. In this dilemma, he knew no one to whom he could turn for advice.
dilatory
tending to delay; intentionally delayiing. If you are dilatory in paying your bills, your credit rating may suffer.
dilate
expand. In the dark, the pupils of your eyes
dilapidated
ruined because of neglect. The dilapidated old building needed far more work than just a new coat of paint. Dilapidation
digression
wandering away from the subject. Nobody minded when Professor Renoir's lectures wandered away from their official theme; his digressions were always more fasinating than the topic of the day. digress v
diffuse
wordy; rambling spread out (like a gas). If you pay authors by the word, you tempt them to produce diffuse manuscripts rather than brief ones.
diffidence
shyness. You must overcome your idfidence if you intend to become a salesperson
die
device for stamping or impressing; mld. In coining pennies, workers at the old mint squeezed sheets of softened copper between two dies.
didactic
teaching; instructional. Pope's lengthy poem An Essay on Man is too didactic for my taste; i dislike it when poets turn preachy and moralize. didacticism
dictum
authoritative and weighty statement; saying maxim. University adminstrations still follow the old dictum 'publish or perish'. they don't care how good a teacher you are; if you don't publish enough papers, you're out of a job
dichotomy
split; branching into two parts (especially contradictory ones). Willie didn't know how to resolve and the dichotomy between his ambition to go to college and his childhood longing to run away and join the circus. Then he heard about Ringling Brothers Circus college, and he knew he'd found his school
diatribe
bitter scolding; invective. During the lengthy diatribe delievered by his opponent he reamined calm and self-controlled
diaphanous
sheer; transparent. Through the diaphanous curtains, the burglar could clearly see the large jewelry box on the dressing table. SExy nightgowns are diaphanous; woolen long joins, fortunately are not.
dialectical
relating to the art of debate; mutual of reciprocal. The debate coach's students grew to develop great forensic and dialectical skill. Teaching, however is inherentlya dialectical situation; the coach learned at least as much from her students as they learned form her. dialectics N
diadem
crown. The king's diadem was on display at the museum
diabolical
devilish. 'What a fiend I am, to devise such a diabolical scheme to destroy Gotham City. ' chortled the Joker.
dexterous
skillful. The magician was so dexterous that we could not follow his movements as he performed his tricks
devout
pious. The devout man prayed daily.
devotee
enthusiastic follower. A devotee of the opera, she bought season tickets every year.
devolve
be transferred to another; delegate to another; gradually worsen. Because HUmpty Dumpty was too shattered by his fall to clean up his own mess, al the work of picking up the pieces devolved upon poor Alice.
devoid
lacking. you may thing cher's mind is a total void, but she's actually not devoid of intelligence. She just sounds like an airhead
devise
think up; invent; plan. HOw clever he must be to have devised such a devious plan! What ingenious inventions might he have devised if he had turned his mind to science rather than to crime.
devious
roundabout; erratic; not straightforward. The Joker's plan was so devious that it was only with great difficulty we could follow its shifts and dodges
deviate
turn away from (a principle, norm); depart; diverge. Richard never deviated fro his daily orutine; every day he set off for work at 8 , had his sak lunch at noon, and headed home at the stroke of five.
detrimental
harmful, damaging
detraction
slandering; aspersion.Because Jo and Mary dared to fight for women's rights, their motives, manners, dress, personal appearance, and character were held up to ridicule and detraction
detonation
explosion. The detonation of the bomb could be heard miles away
deterrent
something that discourages; hindrance. Does the threat of capital punishment serve as a deterrent to potential killers?
determination
resolve; measurement or calculation; deicsion.
determinate
having a fixed order of procedure; invariable. At the royal wedding, the procession of the nobles followed a determinate order of precedence
detached
emotionally removed; calm and objective; physically separate. A psychoanalyst must maintain a detahced point of view and stay uninolved with her patients' personal lives.
desultory
aimless; haphazard; digressing at random. In prison Malcolm X set himself the task of reading straight through the dictionary; to him, reading was purposeful, not desultory
desuetude
state of disuse. Overshadowed by the newly popular waltzes adnd cotilions, the English country dances of Jane Austen's time fell into desuetude until they were rediscovered during the folk dance revivfval of the early 20th C
destitute
extremely poor. Because they had no health insurance, the father's costlyillness left the family destitute. Destitution N
despot
tyrant; harsh, authoritatirian ruler. How could a benevolent king turn overnight into a despot? Despotism n
despondent
depressed; glommy. To the disterss of his parents, william became seriously despondent after he broke up with Jan. despondency n
despoil
strip of valuable; rob. Seeking plunder, the raiders despoiled the village, carrying off any valuables they found
despise
look on with scorn; regard as worth;ess or distasteful Mr. Bond, I despise spies; i look down on them as mean, despicable, honorless men, whom I would wipe from the face of the earth with as little concern as I would scrape dog droppings from the bottom of my shoe
desparado
reckless outlaw. Butch Cassidy was a bold desperado with a price on his head
desolate
rob of joy; lay waste to; forsake. The bandits desolated the countryside, burning farms and carrying off the harvest
desolate
unpopulated; joyless. After six months in the crowded, bustling metropolis, David was so sick of peoplethat he was ready to head for the most desolate patch of wilderness he could find
desiccate
dry up. A tour of this smokehouse will give you an idea of how the pioneers used to desiccate food in order to preserve it.
desecrate
profane; violate the sanctity of. Shatteringthe altar and trampling the holy objects underfoot, the invaders desecrated the sanctuary
descry
catch sight of. In the distance, we could barely descry the enmy vessels
derogatory
expressing a low opinoi. Because the word Eskimo has come under strong attack in recent years for its supposedly derogatoryc onnotations; many Americans today either avoid the term or feel uneasy using it
dermatologist
one who studies skin or its disease
derivative
unoriginal; obtained from another source. Although her early poetry was clearly derivative in nature, the critics thought she had promise and eventually would find her own voice
deride
ridicule; make fun of. The critics derided his pretentious dialogue and refused to consider his play seriously. Despite the critics' derision, however, audiences were moved by the play, cheering its unabsehedly sentimental conclusion derisive. adj
derelict
abandoned; negligent. The mother derelict his child and put him into the froster home.
derange
make insane; disarrange. Hamlet's cruel rejection deranged poor Ophelia; in her madness, she drowned herself
depredation
plundering. After the depredations of the invaders, the people were penniless
depreciate
lessen in value
deprecate
express disapproval of ; protest against; belittle. A firm believer in old-fashioned courtesy, Miss Post deprecated the modern tendency to address new acquaintances by their first names. deprecatory
depravity
extreme corruption; wickedness. The depravity of Caligula's behavior eventually sickened even those who had willingly participated in his earlier, comparatively innocent orgies. deprave v
deposition
testimony under oath. She made her deposition in the judge's chamber
depose
dethrone; remove from office. The army attempted to depose the king and set up a military government
deploy
spread out (troops) in an extended though shallow battle line.
deplore
regret. Although I deplore the vulgarity of yur language, I defedn your right ot express yourself freely
deplete
reduce; exhaust. We must wait until we deplete our present inventory before we order replacements
depict
portray. In this sensational expose, the author depicts Beatle John Lennon as a drug-crazed neurotic. Do you question the accuracy of this depiction of Lennon?
denounce
condemn; criticize. The reform candidate denounced the corrupt city officers for having betrayed the public's trust. decnunciation n
denouement
outcome; final development of the plot of a play or other literary work. The play was childishly written; the denouement was obviosu to sophisticated theatergoers as early as the middle of the first act
denotation
meaning; distinguishing by name. A dictionary will always give us the denotation of a word; frequently, it will also give us its connotation
denizen
inhabitant or resident; regular visitor. In the untouchables, Eliot Ness fiths Al Capone and the other denizens of Chicago's underworld. Ness's fight against corruption was the talk of all the denizens of the local bars
denigrate
blacken. ALl attemptsto denigrate the character of our late president have failed, the peopel stilll love him and cherish his memory
demure
grave; serious; coy. She was demure and reserved, a nice modest girl whom any young man would be proud to take home to his mother.
demur
adj object (because of doubts, scrupless) hesitate. When offered a post on the board of directors, David demurred; he had scruples about taking on the job because he was unsure he could handle it in addition to his other responsibilities
demur
n. objection; protest. Michelangelo regularly denied that leonardo da vinci had incluenced him, and critics have usually accepted his statements without demur
demotic
pertaining to the people. HE lamented the passing of aristocratic society and maintained that a demotic society owuld lower the nation's standards
demoniac
fiendish. The Spanish INquisiton devised many demoniac means of torture. demon n
demolition
destruction. One of the major aims of the air force was the complete demolition of all means of transportation by the bombing of rail lines and terminals. demolish v
demographic
related to population balance
demise
death. Upon the demise of the dictator, a bitter dispute about succession to power developed
demented
insane. Doctor Demento was a radio personality who liked to act as if he were truly demented. If you're demented; your mental state is out of whack; in other words, u're wacky
demeanor
behavior; bearing. His sober demeanor quieted the noisy revelers
demean
degrade; humiliate. Standing on his dignity, he refused to demena himself by replying to the offensive letter. If you truly believed in the dignity of labor, you would not think it would emean you to work as a janitor
demagogue
person who appeals to people's prejudice; false leader. He was accused of being a demagogue because he made promises that aroused futile hopes in his listeners
delve
dig; investigate. Delving into old books and manuscripts is part of a researcher's ob
delusive
deceptive; raising vain hopes. DO not raise your hopes on the basis of his delusive promises
delusion
false belief; hallucination. Don suffers from delusions of grandeur; he thinks the's a world famous author when he's published just one paperback book
deluge
flood; rush. When we advertised the position we received a deluge of application
delude
deceive. THe mistress deludes herself into believing that her lover will leave his wife and marry her
delta
flat plain of mud or sand between braches of a river. His dissertation discussed the effect of intermitten flooding on the fertility of the Nile delta
delirium
mental disorder marked by confusion. In his delirium, the drunkard saw pink panthers and talking pigs. Perhaps, he wasn't delirious; he might jsut have wandered into a movie house.
delineate
portray; ponder. Abel asked Christina to deliberate before buying a new house.
deleterious
harmful. If you believe that smoking is deleterious to your health (and the Surgeon General surely does), then quit
delete
erase; strike out.
deign
condescend; stoop. The celebrated fashion designer would not deign to speak to a mere seamsterss; his overburdened assistant had to convey the masters' wishes to the lowly workers assembling his great designs
deify
turn into a god; idolize. Admire the rock star all you want; just don't deify him
dehydrate
remove from water; dry out
degradation
humiliation; debasement; dgeneration. Some secretaries object to fetching the boss a cup of coffee because they resent the degradation of being made to perform such lowly tasks. degrade v
degenerate
become worse; deteriorate. As the fight dragged on, the champion's style degenerated until he could barely keep on his feet
defunct
dead; no longer in use or existence The lawyers sought to examine the books of the defunct corporation
deft
neat; skillful. The deft waiter uncorked the champagne without spilling a drop
defrock
to strip a priest or minister of church authority. We knew the minister had violated church regulations but we had not realized his offense was serious enough to cause him to bed efrocked
defray
provide for the payment of. Her employer offered to defray the costs of her postgrad education
defoliate
destroy leaves. In Vietnam the army made extensive use of chemical agents to defoliate the woodlands
deflect
turn aside. HIs life was saved when his cigarette case deflected the bullet
definitive
most reliable or complete. Carol Sandburg's Abraham Lincoin may be regarded as the definitive work on the life of the Great Emancipator
defile
pollute; profane. The hoodlums defiled the churhc with their scurrious writing
defiance
refusal to yield; resistance. When John reached the 'terrible two's he responsde to every parental request with howwls of definance defy v defiant adj
deference
courteous regard for another's wish. Ind eference to the minister's request, pleaes do not take photographs during the wedding service.
defer
give in respectfully; submit. When it comes to making decisions about purchasing software, we must defer to Michae;, our computer guru; he has the final word. Michael however, can defer these quesetions to no one; only he can decide
defection
desertion. The children, who had made him an idol, were hurt most by his defection from our cause
defeatist
resigned to defeat; accepting defeat as a natural outcome. If you maintain your defeatist attitude, you will never succeed
default
failure to act. When the visiting team failed to show up for the big game, they lost the game y default.
defame
harm someone's reputation; malign; slander. If you try to defame my good name, my lawyers will see you in court
deface
mar; disfugre. If you deface a library book you will have to pay a hefty fine
deducible
derived by reasoning. If we accept your premise, your conclusions are easily deducible
decry
express strong disapproval of; disparage. The founder of the chidren's defese fund, marian wright , strongly decries the lack of financial and moral support for children in america today
decrepitude
state of collapse caused by illness or old age. I was unprepared for the state of decrepitude in which I had found my old friend; he seemed to have aged twenty years in six months
decoy
lure or bait. The wild ducks were not fooled by the decoy
decorum
propriety; orderliness and good taste in anners. Even the best-mannered students have trouble behaving with decorum on the last day of school. decorous adj
decomposition
decay.
decollete
having a low cut neckline. Fashion decrees that evning gowns be decollete this season; bare shoulders are again the vogue
decipher
decode. I could not decipher the doctor's handwriting
declivity
downward slope. The chhildren loved to ski down the declivity
decimate
kill, usually one out of ten. We do mor to decimate our population in automobile accidents than we do in war.
deciduous
falling off, as of leaves. The oak is a deciduous tree
debonair
urbane and suave; amiable; cheerful and carefree. Reporters frequently describe polished and charming leading men- cary grant is an example as debonair
debiliate
weaken;enfeeble. Michael's sever bout of the flu debiliated him so much that he was too tired to go to work for a week
debauch
corrupt; seduce from virtue. Did socrates ' teachings lead the young men of athens to be virtuous citizens, or did they debauch the young men, causing them to question the customs of their fathers?
debase
reduce the quality or value; lower in esteem; insult degrade.Anna refused to kneel down and prostate herself befoer the king; she feels that to do so would debase her position, and she will not submit to such debasement.
debacle
sudden downfall; complete diaster. In the Airplane movies, every flight turns into a debacle, with passengers and crew members collapsing, engines falling apart, and carry on baggae popping out of the overhead bins
dearth
scarcity. The dearth of skilled labor compelled the employers to open trade schools
deadpan
wooden; impassive. We wanted to see how long he could maintain his deadpan expression
deadlock
standstill; stalemate. Because negotiations had reached a deadlock, some of the delegates had begun to mutter about breaking off the talks
dawdle
loiter; waste time. Christina is dawdling her time, not studying GRE
dauntless
bold. Despite the dangerous nature of the undertaking, the dauntless soldier volunteered for the assignment
daunt
intimidate; frigten
daub
smear (as with pating). from the way he daubed his paint on the canvvavs, i could tell he knew nothing of oils
dappled
spotted. The sunlight filtering through the screens created a dappled effect on the wall.
dapper
neat and trim. Mum's hair is dapper, very neat and nicely trimmed.
dank
damp. The walls of the dungeon were dank and slim
damp
lessen in intesity; diminish; mute. Not even the taunts of his brother, wo considered ballet no proper pursuit for a lad, could damp BIlly Elliot's enthusiasm for dancing
dally
trifle with; procrastinate. Laertes told Ophelia that Hamlet would only daily with her affection
dais
raised platform for guests of honor. When she approached the dais, she was greeted by cheers from the people who had come to honor her.
dabble
work at in a nonserious fashion; splash around. The amateur painter dabbled at art, but seldom produced a finihed piece