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26 Cards in this Set

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400-1300 (3)
1. Caedmon c. 670
2. Unknown author of Beowulf c. 750
3. Geoffrey of Monmouth, Wave, and Layamon contribute to "History of the Kings of Britain" in the 1200s
1066 (2)
1. Battle of Hastings--the decisive victory in the Normon Conquest of England.
2. Old English was significantly influenced by medieval French after this.
1300-1500 (4)
1. Middle English spoken
2. Geoffrey Chaucer, 1380
3. William Langland, 1380
4. Thomas Mallory, 1450
Battle of Agincourt, 1415
The Battle of Agincourt[a] was an English victory against a larger French army in the Hundred Years' War. The battle occurred on Friday 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day), in northern France.[5][b] Henry V's victory started a new period in the war, in which Henry married the French king's daughter and his son was made heir to the throne of France, but his achievement was squandered by his heirs, notably Henry VI.
Gutenberg Bible, 1456
First printed book in Europe. Printed by Johannes Gutenberg in Mainz, Germany. Marks the start of the "Gutenberg Revolution" and the age of the printed book.
1500-1558 (3)
1. Early Tudor period. Reigns of Henry VII, Henry VIII, Edward VI, and Mary
2. John Skelton
3. Thomas More
1558-1603 (7)
1. Elizabethan era. Reign of Elizabeth I.
2. William Shakespeare
3. Edmund Spenser
4. Christopher Marlowe
5. Sir Philip Sidney
6. Ben Jonson
7. John Lyly
1603-1625 (3)
1. Jacobean period. Reign of James I.
2. John Donne
3. John Webster
1625-1649 (2)
1. Caroline period. Reign of Charles I.
2. John Milton
1649-1660
1. Charles I executed in 1649
2. Cromwell and the Interregnum
3. Andrew Marvell
4. Robert Herrick
1660-1714 (7)
1. The Restoration
2. Reign of Charles II, 1660-1702
3. Reign of Ann (the last Stuart monarch, 1702-1714
4. William Congreve
5. George Etherege
6. John Bunyan
7. John Dryden
1714-1727 (3)
1. Reign of George I of the House of Hanover
2. Alexander Pope
3. Daniel Defoe
1727-1760 (4)
1. Reign of George II
2. Jonathan Swift
3. Henry Fielding
4. Thomas Gray
1760-1790 (10)
1. The Enlightenment
2. First 30 years of George III's reign
3. The American Revolution, 1776-1783
4. The Gothic novel
5. Samuel Johnson
6. Mary Wollstonecraft
7. Lawrence Sterne
8. Horace Walpole
9. Thomas Chatterton
10. William Cowper
1790-1820 (12)
1. Early Romantic period
2. Second 30 years of George III's reign
3. Sturm und Drang movement in Germany
4. Ann Radcliffe
5. William Blake
6. William Wordsworth
7. Samual Coleridge
8. Percy Bysshe Shelley
9. Lord Byron
10. John Keats
11. Charles Lamb
12. Jane Austen
The Enlightenment
1760-1790. reason was advocated as the primary source and legitimacy for authority. Developing more or less simultaneously in Germany, France, Great Britain, The Netherlands, Italy, Spain, and Portugal, and buoyed by the North American colonists' successful rebellion against Great Britain in the American War of Independence, the culmination of the movement spread through much of Europe, including the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, Russia and Scandinavia, along with Latin America and instigating the Haitian Revolution. It has been argued that the signatories of the American Declaration of Independence, the United States Bill of Rights, the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen, and the Polish-Lithuanian Constitution of May 3, 1791, were motivated by "Enlightenment" principles.
Early Romantic period
1790-1820. Romanticism is a complex artistic, literary, and intellectual movement that originated in the second half of the 18th century in Western Europe, and gained strength during the Industrial Revolution.[1] It was partly a revolt against aristocratic social and political norms of the Age of Enlightenment and a reaction against the scientific rationalization of nature,[2] and was embodied most strongly in the visual arts, music, and literature.

The movement stressed strong emotion as a source of aesthetic experience, placing new emphasis on such emotions as trepidation, horror and awe—especially that which is experienced in confronting the sublimity of untamed nature and its picturesque qualities, both new aesthetic categories. It elevated folk art and custom to something noble, and argued for a "natural" epistemology of human activities as conditioned by nature in the form of language, custom and usage.
Sturm and Drang
Literary and musical movement in Germany from 1790-1820. Name means "storm and stress/urge/longing/drive/impulse." Individual subjectivity and, in particular, extremes of emotion were given free expression in response to the confines of rationalism imposed by the Enlightenment and associated aesthetic movements.
1820-1837 (7)
1. Middle Romantic period
2. Reign of George IV, 1820-1830
3. Reign of William IV, 1830-1837
4. Thomas Carlyle (British)
5. Alfred Tennyson (British)
6. Edgar Allan Poe (American)
7. Washington Irving (American)
1837-1869
1. Late Romantic and Victorian periods
2. First 32 years of Victoria's reign
3. Charles Dickens (British)
4. Robert Browning (British)
5. Thomas Macaulay (British)
6. Emily Brontë (British)
7. Charlotte Brontë (British)
8. Transcendentalism in the US
9. Walt Whitman (American)
10. Nathaniel Hawthorne (American)
11. Ralph Waldo Emerson (American)
12. Henry David Thoreau (American)
Romantic period
1790-1869. Romanticism is a complex artistic, literary, and intellectual movement that originated in the second half of the 18th century in Western Europe, and gained strength during the Industrial Revolution.[1] It was partly a revolt against aristocratic social and political norms of the Age of Enlightenment and a reaction against the scientific rationalization of nature,[2] and was embodied most strongly in the visual arts, music, and literature.

The movement stressed strong emotion as a source of aesthetic experience, placing new emphasis on such emotions as trepidation, horror and awe—especially that which is experienced in confronting the sublimity of untamed nature and its picturesque qualities, both new aesthetic categories. It elevated folk art and custom to something noble, and argued for a "natural" epistemology of human activities as conditioned by nature in the form of language, custom and usage.
1869-1901 (10)
1. Second 30 years of Victoria's reign
2. Realism
3. George Meredith (British)
4. John Ruskin (British)
5. Charles Swinburne (British)
6. Thomas Hardy (British)
7. George Eliot (British)
8. Gerard M. Hopkins (British)
9. Mark Twain (American)
10. Henry James (American)
1901-1939
1. Modernism
2. William Butler Yeats (British)
3. Joseph Conrad (British)
4. D. H. Lawrence (British)
5. W. H. Auden (British)
6. James Joyce (British)
7. Virginia Woolf (British)
8. Ernest Hemingway (American)
9. F. Scott Fitzgerald (American)
10. Gertrude Stein (American)
11. T.S. Eliot (American)
12. Ezra Pound (American)
13. W.E.B. Du Bois (American)
14. H.D. (American)
15. e.e.cummings (American)
Modernism
1901-1939. The term encompasses the activities and output of those who felt the "traditional" forms of art, architecture, literature, religious faith, social organization and daily life were becoming outdated in the new economic, social and political conditions of an emerging fully industrialized world.A salient characteristic of modernism is self-consciousness. This often led to experiments with form, and work that draws attention to the processes and materials used (and to the further tendency of abstraction).
The Epic
An epic is a long narrative about sustained heroism. Epics usually begin with the invocation of a muse--which is called the "epic invocation" or the "epic question" (since the poet usually asks the muse to help him remember or do justice to the events of the past). The action begins in the midst of things--"in medias res." For example, The Illiad begins when the seige of Troy has already been going on for 10 years. Background information is supplied later, as the narrative unfolds, and is usually provided in long lists called "epic catalogues." The lists might include what gods or goddess were helpign which side, who begat who, what the hero went through on his journey to get here, or gear that the warriors have. Epics often have long, highly stylized similes and metaphors, called "epic similes." Epics usually involve interfering or interested supernatural beings who toy with the human participants. Epics are almost always resolved by a great battle, contest, or deed.
Restoration Comedy
Literary period from 1660-1790, from the restoration of Charles Stuart to the French Revolution. They are comedies of language and manners, almost always centered on the tension between socially acceptable behavior regarding sex and marriage and the real human characteristics of lust and social ambition. The “war of the sexes” is also another important motif. The plays usually open with a verse prologue to the audience, but are not in verse. Plays themselves are notable for their cynical, punning, innuendo-laden language. Character names usually reflect their comic failings. Examples of Restoration comedy plays: William Wycherly’s “The Country Wife” (1675) which stars Mr. Horner, Mr. Pinchwife, Sir Jasper Fidget, Mrs. Squeamish, and Mrs. Dainty Fidget; George Etherege’s “The Man of Mode” (1676) featuring Mr. Dorimant, Sir fopling Flutter, and Mrs. Loveit; William Congreve’s “The Way of the World” (1700) featuring Millament (a woman), Mirabell (a man), Mr. Fainall, Lady Wishfort, Foible (a woman), and Mincing (a woman); Richard Sheridan’s “The School for Scandal” (1777) featuring Sir Peter Teazle, Maria, Lady Sneerwell, Sir Benjamin Backbite, and Charles Surface.