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107 Cards in this Set

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Rail
to complain bitterly (to rail against)
Ramify
to be divided or subdivided. Branch out
Instead of being resolved, the dispute ramified as more and more people got involved.
Rancorous
characterized by bitter, long-lasting resentment

A rancorous feud
Reconnoiter
to make a preliminary inspection of, to engage in reconnaissance

o inspect, observe, or survey (the enemy, the enemy's strength or position, a region, etc.) in order to gain information for military purposes.

Our attempts to reconnoiter the area for a good camping site was cut short when it began to get dark.
Reconnaissance
1.the act of reconnoitering.
2.Military. a search made for useful military information in the field, esp. by examining the ground.
3.Surveying, Civil Engineering. a general examination or survey of a region, usually followed by a detailed survey.
Recumbent
leaning, resting, prone

Ancient Romans were fond of dining recumbent on couches and pillows.
Redoubtable
venerable, inspiring honor

“He came from a redoubtable family that was famous for its members having served in the highest positions in the country.”
Reticent
quiet, reserved, reluctant

Within a circle of intimate friends, he's a very sociable person, says Russell Banks, another novelist, who has known Auster since 1977. "Outside of that circle, he's fairly shy and reticent."
Rubric
1. a title, heading, direction, or the like, in a manuscript, book, statute, etc., written or printed in red or otherwise distinguished from the rest of the text.
2. a direction for the conduct of divine service or the administration of the sacraments, inserted in liturgical books.
3. any established mode of conduct or procedure; protocol.
4. an explanatory comment; gloss.
5. a class or category

"She graded the papers according to the rubric."

"This mission is sometimes discussed under the rubric of 'horizontal escalation' . . . from conventional to nuclear war" (Jack Beatty).
Salient
Salient prominent, protruding, conspicuous, highly relevant

The salient fact that I had failed to notice at first was that my ride had left me stranded at the club with no way to get home

Salient characteristics

Salient details

He gave science an exciting, positive image when many Americans were skeptical of it, worried that its most salient effect was to disenchant the universe and undercut religion.
Salutary
favorable to promoting health. remedial, wholesome, causing improvement

Surviving a near-death experience has the salutary effect of concentrating the mind._-- Kenneth T. Walsh and Roger Simon, "Bush turns the tide", U.S. News, February
Sanctimony
self-ritghteous, pretended piety

“Spare me your sanctimonious words, you’re no better than I am.”
Sanction
Sanction: 1. an authoritative permission or approval. : The publisher received sanction from the author to reproduce a section of his book in the anthology.

2. a penalty introduced to enforce compliance.
Sanctions were one of the tools used by the international committee to pressure South Africa into ending its practice of apartheid.
Scurvy
contemptible, despicable. A scurvy trick. A scurvy lie
Sedulous
persistent, diligent
Sere
arid, withered.

"the sere surfaces of Mars."
Simper
to smirk, to say something with a coy smile
Singular
exceptional, unusual, odd.

"A singular rock formation"
Sodden
soaked or drenched. unimaginative, dull

"sodden with drink"
Solicitous
eager, concerned, attentive
Solvent
able to meet financial obligations
Sophistry
fallacious reasoning. seemingly plausable, but actually faulty logic
Sordid
filthy, grimy, squalor
Steep
to saturate or completely soak
Stint
to restrain, to be sparing or frugal
Strut
a structural support used to brace a framework

To brace or support (verb)
Stupefy
to stun, baffle, or amaze
Stymie
to block, thwart

His plans to become a professional football player were stymied when he broke his legs in a car accident.
Superfluous
exceeding what is sufficient or necessary
Supplant
to take the place of, to supersede
Table
to remove (as a parliamentary motion) from consideration

The suggestion to add a free Starbucks to the college campus was tabled from the agenda because the trustees knew in advance that it would be too costly.
Tacit
implied, not explicitly stated tacit permission
Tamp
to plug, drive in by a series of blows tamping tobacco into a pipe
Tender
to offer formally to tender a truce agreement. To tender a resignation
Tortuous
winding, twisting, excessively complicated
A tortuous road, a tortuous argument
Tractable
docile, easily led, obedient. A tractable lamb
Travesty
mockery, parody, caricature
The corrupt trial was a travesty of justice
The satire travestied the White House’s foreign policy
Tumid
swollen
A tumid river
A tumid hand after a fight
Tumescence
swelling
The tumescence of a black-eye
Ungeigned
genuine, not false or hypocritical
Unfeigned hospitality, unfeigned surprise
Untenable
not viable, indefensible


We realized the 2 hour commute was untenable
Variegated
multicolored, characterized by a variety of patches of different colors\
Verisimiitude
appearing true or real
Historical verisimilitude
The eerie verisimilitude of the statue
Veritable
authentic, real, genuine
Virulent
extremely poisonous or harmful virulent poison
Vigilant
alertly watchful
Waft
puff of air
Elocution
the art of clear, concise speaking
Illustrious
highly distinguished
Allude
to refer casually or indirectly
Magnate
a powerful or influential person
Malign
to slander
Maladroit
clumsy, tactless

to handle a diplomatic crisis in a very maladroit way.
Malapropism
humorous misuse of a word “a photogenic memory”
Malfeasance
misconduct or wrongdoing committed by a public official.
But more often than not the same board members who were removed by the chancellor for malfeasance subsequently manage to get reelected in a political process that defies any form of accountability.
Manifest
readily perceived by the eye or the understanding
Minutiae
small or trivial details
Eminent
1. towering above others, projecting. “eminent peaks”
2. high in station, rank, or prominent. “eminent statesmen.”
3. conspicuous or noteworthy. “eminent fairness.”
preeminent
superior to or notable above all others. “He is preeminent in his profession.”
Emissary
a messenger or agent sent to represent the interests of another. “emissaries to negotiate a peace”
Remit
to send money
Remission
a lessening of intensity or degree
“the cancer is thankfully in remission.”
promiscuous
consisting of diverse and unrelated parts or individuals
Commute
to substitute, exchange, interchange The prison sentence was commuted to a sentence of community service.
Transmutation
the act of changing from one form into another
Permutation
a complete change, a transformation
Cognate
related by blood, having a common ancestor
Taxonomy
the science, laws, or principles of classification
Nominal
negligible, existing only in name
Obfuscate
to render indistinct or dim, darken
To bewilder, stupefy
to make obscure or unclear: to obfuscate a problem with extraneous information.
Obsequious
overly submissive. Displaying servile behavior.
“obsequious servants.”
Omnibus
an anthology of the works of one author of writings on related subjects
Panoply
a wide-ranging and impressive array or display: the dazzling panoply of the maharaja's procession; the panoply of European history.
Pantheon
a public building containing tombs or memorials of the illustrious deed of a nation
Par
an equality in value or standing
Parity
equality
Paragon
a model of excellence

Even his friends and business associates, men and women alike, were paragons of health: avoiders of fatty foods, moderate drinkers, health-club habitues, lovers of cross-country skiing, weekend canoe trips, and daylong hikes in the North Woods
Dispassionate
impartial

a dispassionate critic
Perforate
to make a way through or into something
Pertinacious
resolute “a pertinacious salesman from whom I could not escape.”
Philatest
one who loves or collects postage stamps
Philology
the study of literary texts to establish their authenticity and determine their meaning
Replete
abundantly supplied. “ a speech replete with sentimentality.”
Expound
to set forth in detail “when I broke up with him, I expounded his wrongdoings over the past month.”
Repository
a receptacle or place where things are deposited
Deportment
conduct, behavior
Post facto
after the fact
Presentiment
foreboding. He'd had a presentiment of this. Yes, he had known that this was precisely what would be said.
Reprisals
retaliation against an enemy
Pugalist
a fighter or boxer
Perquisite
a gratuity, tip
Risible
causing laughter
Arrogate
to claim unwarrantably or presumptuously
A measure to abolish or radically restrict the ability of ministers to arrogate powers to themselves would be a necessary adjunct to the list of proposals on "open government/parliament".
Execreble
abominable, detestable
His human-rights record was abysmal. His relations with Washington were adversarial. He rivaled Zimbabwe's execrable Robert Mugabe for the title "Africa's Saddam."
Secede
to withdraw formally from an association
Insensate
without feeling or sensitivity
Protract
to prolong, draw out, extend
Convivial
sociable
The convivial atmosphere would continue on the way home, with a bag of toffees and more stories including, quite often, the story of How Grandpa Was Found
Avocation
something one does in addition to a principle occupation
Vociferous
crying out noisily

Claudio has work to do and I have a vociferous son demanding a story.
Ditty/Ditties
a poem/poems intended to be sung
Legerdemain
1. Sleight of hand._
2. A display of skill, trickery, or artful deception.
Their alleged legerdemain at the blackjack table and roulette wheel of the luxurious Salle Anglaise was caught on closed-circuit television.
Sleight
1.skill; dexterity.
2.an artifice; stratagem.
3.cunning; craft.
Conscription
1. compulsory enrollment of persons for military or naval service; draft.
2.a compulsory contribution of money to a government during a time of war
Inflammable
able or likely to burn
Truss
to tie, bind, or fassen
undergird
to give fundamental support; provide with a sound or secure basis: ethics undergirded by faith.

to strengthen; secure, as by passing a rope or chain under and around: to undergird a top-heavy load.