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16 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
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engender
verb

beget, procreate
generare = to generate
countermand
verb, transitive

to revoke (a command) by a contrary order
from contre- counter- + mander to command
palliate
verb, transitive

to reduce the violence of (a disease)
from Late Latin palliatus, past participle of palliare to cloak, conceal
vainglory
noun

excessive or ostentatious pride especially in one's achievements

vainglorious
vain+glory
penury
noun

severe poverty
from Latin penuria, paenuria want
tenebrous
adjective

shut off from the light
Marnie prefers airy spaces with many windoes to tenebrous areas.
vituperative
adjective

uttering or given to censure : containing or characterized by verbal abuse
truculent
adjective

feeling or displaying ferocity
from truc-, trux savage
irascible
adjective

marked by hot temper and easily provoked anger
from Latin irasci to become angry, be angry
umbrage
noun

a feeling of pique or resentment at some often fancied slight or insult
"I took umbrage at the speaker's remarks."
Latin umbraticum, neuter of umbraticus of shade
ignoble
adjective

of low birth or common origin, plebian
nugatory
adjective

of little or no consequence: trifling
from nugari to trifle
inure
verb

transitive: to accustom to accept something undesirable

intransitive: to become of advantage
from Middle French uevre work, practice
torpid
adjective

having lost motion or the power of exertion or feeling
Latin torpidus, from torpEre to be sluggish or numb
nescience
noun

lack of knowledge or awareness: ignorance
from Latin nescient-, nesciens, present participle of nescire not to know
lugubrious
adjective

mournful
akin to Greek lygros mournful