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118 Cards in this Set

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The “standard model” of how judges should make decisions says that they ought to consider three sets of factors: the facts of a case, the applicable laws, and
a. their political obligations.
b. instructions from the president.
c. any applicable precedents.
d. their judicial philosophy.
*c. any applicable precedents.
The view that judges should discern the general principles underlying laws or the Constitution and apply them to modern circumstances is called
a. judicial review.
b. judicial activism.
c. judicial restraint.
d. judicial conservatism.
*b. judicial activism.
The term “senatorial courtesy” refers to
a. presidents consulting senators before appointing judges.
b. the tradition of unlimited debate in the Senate.
c. rules governing how senators conduct committee hearings.
d. how the courts defer to the preferences of senators.
*a. presidents consulting senators before appointing judges.
A bicameral legislature has
a. two parties.
b. two houses.
c. two committees.
d. two humps.
*b. two houses.
In lecture it was pointed out that the House and Senate are quite different from one another. An example of the difference is:
a. The Senate doesn’t use committees; the House does.
b. The House has a formal leadership structure; the Senate doesn’t.
c. Senators have the right to filibuster; House members don’t.
d. House members often are national media figures; Senators rarely are.
*c. Senators have the right to filibuster; House members don’t.
The principle of stare decisis is important because
a. it allows the House to run in an orderly fashion.
b. it makes the law stable and predictable.
c. it requires bureaucrats to respect the intent of Congress.
d. it protects whistleblowers from retribution.
*b. it makes the law stable and predictable.
When we say that the U.S. now has “divided government,” we are referring to
a. different parties in control of the legislative and executive branches.
b. the separation of powers and checks and balances among the branches.
c. the federal system, with its division of power between nation and states.
d. times when public opinion is closely divided on the major issues of the day.
*a. different parties in control of the legislative and executive branches.
The “Civil Rights Restoration Act” was an example of
a. the president’s use of his unilateral power.
b. the powerful effect of “going public.”
c. how the courts sometimes make law.
d. the working of the checks-and-balances system.
*d. the working of the checks-and-balances system.
A “clientele” department would be found in
a. the “outer” cabinet.
b. the “inner” cabinet.
c. the Executive Office of the President.
d. the Congress.
*a. the “outer” cabinet.
The president’s “emergency power” was first claimed by
a. President Andrew Jackson.
b. President Abraham Lincoln.
c. President Woodrow Wilson.
d. President Franklin Roosevelt.
*b. President Abraham Lincoln.
The process of judicial selection has become harsher and more partisan since the Senate’s rejection of President Reagan’s Supreme Court nominee
a. Robert Bork.
b. Clarence Thomas.
c. Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
d. Rush Limbaugh.
*a. Robert Bork.
The main reason that “pork barrel” projects continue to be passed is that
a. they benefit national political party organizations.
b. members of Congress don’t care about the voters.
c. the media don’t pay enough attention to them.
d. they help members of Congress get reelected.
*d. they help members of Congress get reelected.
According to lecture, the next cabinet department to gain “inner” cabinet status will be the Department of
a. Environmental Protection.
b. Homeland Security.
c. Veterans’ Affairs
d. Education.
*b. Homeland Security.
The term “rule making” describes
a. the process OCR went through when interpreting Title IX.
b. what congressional conference committees do.
c. the statements judges issue when they have decided a case.
d. one of the president’s unilateral powers.
*a. the process OCR went through when interpreting Title IX.
An order from the House Rules Committee that limits debate and forbids amendment of a bill is called a
a. closed rule.
b. sequential referral.
c. quorum call.
d. cloture petition.
*a. closed rule.
When the president acts as “head of state” (or “chief of state”), his role most closely resembles that of
a. a judge.
b. a campaign manager.
c. a legislator.
d. a monarch.
*d. a monarch.
President Bush has used his signing statements mainly to
a. signal his intentions to other governments.
b. create photo opportunities for the media.
c. influence the interpretation of legislation.
d. criticize his political adversaries.
*c. influence the interpretation of legislation.
Members of Congress use riders to
a. stall or defeat legislation.
b. get their pet projects passed.
c. communicate with their constituents.
d. raise their own salaries.
*b. get their pet projects passed.
A believer in “judicial restraint” would
a. expect Congress to make sure the judiciary did not go too far.
b. trust the president to place necessary limits on the judges.
c. expect judges to be reluctant to overrule the other branches.
d. prefer that judges be subject to elections.
*c. expect judges to be reluctant to overrule the other branches.
A parliamentary system is one in which
a. there is no chief executive.
b. the chief executive is picked by the legislature.
c. the chief executive gets the job through heredity.
d. there are no political parties.
*b. the chief executive is picked by the legislature.
The tenure of a federal judge is
a. two years, renewable indefinitely.
b. six years, with a maximum of three terms.
c. ten years, with a maximum of three terms.
d. life.
*d. life.
The federal courts that actually conduct trials (with juries, witnesses, evidence, etc.) are (is) the
a. district courts.
b. courts of appeals.
c. Supreme Court
d. All of the above.
*a. district courts.
Bureaucrats are expected to treat citizens “impersonally” because
a. they are paid poorly, and can’t be expected to try hard.
b. due to high turnover, most bureaucrats are inexperienced.
c. since they can’t be fired, bureaucrats don’t have to be polite.
d. they are trying to avoid favoritism and discrimination.
*d. they are trying to avoid favoritism and discrimination.
When presidents try to influence Congress by appealing to the public (“going public”), how successful are they?
a. Almost always successful.
b. Successful in foreign but not domestic policy.
c. Successful in domestic but not foreign policy.
d. Rarely successful.
*d. Rarely successful.
Corruption and incompetence under the “spoils system” led eventually to
a. the creation of Congress’s investigative power.
b. the resignation of President Grant.
c. the institution of the president’s cabinet.
d. the start of the civil service system.
*d. the start of the civil service system.
Representatives who always tries to vote the way their constituencies would like them to are called
a. delegates.
b. servants.
c. trustees.
d. followers.
*a. delegates.
. Which of the following presidents is an example of “the president as Samson?”
a. Lyndon Johnson
b. Gerald Ford
c. Ronald Reagan
d. Harry Truman
*b. Gerald Ford
. During a president’s term in office, his popularity tends to
a. increase.
b. decline.
c. stay about the same.
d. None of these – there is no predictable pattern.
*b. decline.
The president’s line item veto
a. is one of the key unilateral powers of the presidency.
b. is seldom used and thus not very important.
c. is easier to override than other vetos.
d. does not exist.
*d. does not exist.
A legislator or president still in office after being defeated in an election is called a
a. lame duck.
b. gone goose.
c. swan song.
d. yellow-bellied sapsucker.
*a. lame duck.
When committees of Congress do “oversight,” they are
a. watching the bureaucracy to be sure it follows Congress’s intent.
b. deliberately refusing to look at certain embarrassing problems.
c. working to make sure that their bills pass the full House or Senate.
d. measuring public opinion prior to deciding how to vote on a bill.
*a. watching the bureaucracy to be sure it follows Congress’s intent.
Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California will soon become the top leader in the House when she assumes the title of
a. President Pro-Tem.
b. Majority Leader.
c. Speaker.
d. Majority Whip.
*c. Speaker.
The last president to be impeached was
a. Bill Clinton.
b. Richard Nixon.
c. Andrew Johnson.
d. No president has ever been impeached
*a. Bill Clinton.
An appropriation is a bill in Congress that gives
a. permission to begin or continue a program or agency.
b. a grant of money to finance a program or agency.
c. a committee the right to investigate a program or agency.
d. congressional approval to a presidential nomination or treaty.
*b. a grant of money to finance a program or agency.
“Red tape” refers to
a. wire tapping embassies of Communist countries.
b. bureaucratic rules and procedures.
c. a bill that is ready to go to the president.
d. a signal that the Supreme Court will decide a case.
*b. bureaucratic rules and procedures.
The account of retirement reform in Wasserman demonstrates the importance of
a. an issue network.
b. the vice-president’s role in the Senate.
c. “going public” by the president.
d. an iron triangle.
*a. an issue network.
Right after 9/11, the first reaction of Congress was to
a. divide sharply along party lines in debating what to do.
b. declare a recess and turn the government over to the executive.
c. unite behind the President in bipartisan fashion.
d. demonstrate confusion, uncertainty, and paralysis.
*c. unite behind the President in bipartisan fashion.
The Challenger case in Wasserman illustrates “groupthink” on the part of
a. the team that investigated the disaster after it happened.
b. the president and his advisors in approving the mission.
c. the crew of the Challenger.
d. mission managers ignoring safety warnings.
*d. mission managers ignoring safety warnings.
President Nixon’s rationale for refusing to turn over the Watergate tapes was based on
a. the power of the commander-in-chief.
b. his claim of executive privilege.
c. his position as head of state.
d. support by a majority in Congress.
*b. his claim of executive privilege.
The chair of a House committee is always
a. the oldest member of the committee.
b. the one who has been on the committee longest.
c. a close ally of the Speaker.
d. a member of the majority party.
*d. a member of the majority party.
When a partisan realignment occurs,
a. one of the major parties is replaced by a new party.
b. the parties can better address the key issues of the day.
c. one party dominates the presidency and Congress for decades.
d. voters become extremely apathetic.
*b. the parties can better address the key issues of the day.
. A push poll is used to
a. accurately determine public opinion on an issue.
b. closely examine how a particular segment of the public thinks.
c. find out why people voted the way they did.
d. influence voters’ decisions in a upcoming election.
*d. influence voters’ decisions in a upcoming election.
The fact that most U.S. elected officials are chosen from single-member districts in winner-take-all elections helps explain:
a. the degree of extreme partisanship among the electorate.
b. the fact that the U.S. has only two major political parties.
c. the low voter turnout typical of U.S. elections.
d. the influence of the media over the electoral process.
*b. the fact that the U.S. has only two major political parties.
A PAC is
a. a legislative district in a densely-populated area.
b. an agreement among media outlets.
c. the fund-raising and spending arm of an interest group.
d. a campaign to determine who a party’s candidate will be.
*c. the fund-raising and spending arm of an interest group.
The term “gender gap” refers to the fact that
a. a higher percentage of men than of women vote in elections.
b. women are more likely to vote for Democrats than are men.
c. men tend to be better informed about politics than women.
d. most men will not vote for women candidates.
*b. women are more likely to vote for Democrats than are men.
People who “favor government efforts to ensure that everyone has a job, to spend more money on medical and educational programs, and to increase taxation for well-to-do persons” would be described by Wilson & DiIulio as
a. conservatives.
b. liberals.
c. socialists.
d. libertarians.
*b. liberals.
Our guest lecturer, Mr. Key, explained about
a. minority group voting participation.
b. the Democratic party.
c. women’s rights interest groups.
d. campaign finance reform.
*b. the Democratic party.
A primary motivation behind the creation of the Electoral College as a mechanism for selecting the president was
a. the need to check and balance Congress.
b. distrust of ordinary voters.
c. a belief in direct democracy.
d. recognition that even electors need to go to college.
*b. distrust of ordinary voters.
The now-unconstitutional practice of requiring voters to pay a poll tax in order to vote was intended to
a. insure that only highly-motivated people would vote.
b. raise revenue to pay for political campaigns.
c. keep poor people, especially black people, from voting.
d. eliminate voter fraud.
*c. keep poor people, especially black people, from voting.
One would expect the lowest voter turnout among people aged
a. 65 or older.
b. 45 to 64.
c. 25 to 44.
d. 18 to 24.
*d. 18 to 24.
When Congress banned “soft money,” the main effect was
a. to cause political campaigns to cost far less.
b. to force interest groups to find another way to fund campaigns.
c. to make campaigns rely more on political parties.
d. to discourage many people from running for office.
*b. to force interest groups to find another way to fund campaigns.
According to your text, when people participate in party politics or in an interest group as a result of “solidary” incentives, they are looking for
a. patronage.
b. good public policy.
c. social life.
d. publicity.
*c. social life.
Which of the following is a “public interest” organization?
a. The National Association of Manufacturers.
b. The United Autoworkers’ Union.
c. The American Medical Association.
d. The League of Women Voters.
*d. The League of Women Voters.
The probability that an incumbent member of the House of Representatives will win reelection if he or she runs for it is roughly
a. 90%.
b. 75%.
c. 50%.
d. 33%.
*a. 90%.
Your text asks the questions, are national convention delegates representative of their party’s voters. In the case of Democrats, they find that
a. delegates’ views are more liberal than voters’.
b. delegates’ views are more conservative than voters’.
c. delegates’ views are almost identical to voters’.
d. representativeness varies by year – there is no consistent relationship.
*a. delegates’ views are more liberal than voters’.
“Structural” bias in the mass media results from
a. the fact that media outlets are businesses.
b. the fact that most reporters are liberals.
c. the fact that most media owners are conservatives.
d. the fact that government regulates the media.
*a. the fact that media outlets are businesses.
Gerrymandering is the practice of
a. contributing money to legislators who support your issues.
b. writing the party platform so as to unite the party.
c. designing legislative districts to benefit a particular party or candidate.
d. pulling together coalitions comprised of different interest groups.
*c. designing legislative districts to benefit a particular party or candidate.
The “free rider” problem arises because
a. politicians don’t get enough scrutiny in the media.
b. it is unlikely that one vote will change an election outcome.
c. it is not rational for individuals to contribute to public interest groups.
d. with the rise of the internet, much political content is literally given away.
*c. it is not rational for individuals to contribute to public interest groups.
An important part of the job of a “lobbyist” is
a. to produce political advertising, often of a negative kind.
b. to advise clients on how to get around various laws.
c. to advise legislators what interest groups think about proposed laws.
d. to raise money for political parties and candidates.
*c. to advise legislators what interest groups think about proposed laws.
Most delegates to national party conventions are now selected by
a. party leaders.
b. the caucus method.
c. congressional leadership.
d. voters in primaries.
*d. voters in primaries.
Which of the following is a position on a “valence” issue?
a. support for government-run health care.
b. opposition to social security reform.
c. opposition to terrorism.
d. support for gay marriage.
*c. opposition to terrorism.
If a candidate asks for votes on the basis of her successful record in public office, she is appealing to voters who are inclined to vote
a. retrospectively.
b. ideologically.
c. self-interestedly.
d. prospectively.
*a. retrospectively.
The argument that interest groups, taken as a whole, are representative of the opinions and interests of the whole population is usually made by
a. pluralists.
b. elitists.
c. liberals.
d. ideologues.
*a. pluralists.
Some interest groups pursue goals that, if attained, will principally benefit people who are not members of the groups. These groups are called
a. institutional interest groups.
b. social movements.
c. membership interest groups.
d. public interest groups.
*d. public interest groups.
Which of the following areas of society has the most, and most powerful, interest groups representing them?
a. Business
b. Organized labor
c. Environmentalists
d. Minority groups
*a. Business
Which of the following expresses a political “value” in the sense Prof. Walcott used in discussing “values, attitudes, and beliefs”?
a. “President Bush can be trusted to make wise military decisions.”
b. “Taxes on the middle class should be lowered.”
c. “Even a terrorist is entitled to a fair trial.”
d. “PAC money corrupts elected officials.”
*c. “Even a terrorist is entitled to a fair trial.”
The proportion of the voting age population who actually vote in U.S. presidential elections is
a. almost 90%.
b. about 75%.
c. a little under 50%.
d. roughly 33%.
*c. a little under 50%.
When the media carry a story telling of allegations that a member of Congress has been taking illegal bribes from a lobbyist, the media are functioning as
a. gatekeepers.
b. watchdogs.
c. scorekeepers.
d. agitators.
*b. watchdogs.
Compared to the general public, most members of the national media hold political views that are best described as
a. more liberal.
b. more conservative.
c. identical.
d. No way to know – media people don’t reveal their political views.
*a. more liberal.
The psychological process called selective attention suggests that
a. people are highly vulnerable to manipulation by the news media.
b. most people pay no attention at all to the media.
c. people will remember or believe only what they agree with.
d. only television has an impact on people’s political preferences.
*c. people will remember or believe only what they agree with.
the 1970s, public opinion on the issue of abortion has been
a. moderate and stable.
b. polarized toward the extremes, and changeable.
c. polarized and stable.
d. highly variable – sometimes moderate, sometimes polarized.
*a. moderate and stable.
The reelection campaign of Rep. Dick Hayes, described in Wasserman, described a congressional district that was
a. extremely competitive between the parties.
b. safe for the incumbent Republican.
c. safe for the incumbent Democrat.
d. likely to be won by the challenger.
*c. safe for the incumbent Democrat.
According to Wasserman, while the Democrats have had the advantage in registering new voters, Republicans have had the advantage in
a. gerrymandering.
b. polling.
c. blogging.
d. targeting.
*d. targeting.
The “Harry and Louise” advertisements criticized
a. President Bush’s Social Security intiative.
b. President Clinton’s health care plan.
c. President Bush’s “No Child Left Behind” program.
d. President Clinton’s support for tax increases.
*b. President Clinton’s health care plan.
Which kind of “bias” is most evident in media coverage of the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal?
a. pro-establishment bias.
b. liberal bias.
c. anti-establishment bias.
d. east coast elitist bias.
*c. anti-establishment bias.
The single most reliable predictor of an individual’s voting choice is
a. the region in which the person lives.
b. the person’s party identification.
c. the person’s views on abortion.
d. the person’s age.
*b. the person’s party identification.
The most important early events for choosing the nominees for president are the New Hampshire primary and the
a. California primary.
b. Iowa caucuses.
c. New York primary.
d. Louisiana straw poll.
*b. Iowa caucuses.
For a public opinion poll to be valid, it should be based on a
a. random sample.
b. stratified sample.
c. instrumental sample.
d. complete population.
*a. random sample.
The social base of the Democratic party has for decades been rooted in the lower socio-economic classes. This is a result of
a. the philosophy the party has followed since the days of the American
Revolution.
b. the exclusiveness of the Republican party, which has rejected many who
wish to join.
c. the realignment of the early 1930s, when the New Deal appealed to those
hurting most in the depression.
d. the realignment of the 1950s, when the Republican party became the normal
majority party in U.S. politics.
*c. the realignment of the early 1930s, when the New Deal appealed to those hurting most in the depression.
“Motor voter” refers to an effort to
a. make the conduct of elections more efficient.
b. generate support for alternative fuels for cars.
c. drive people to the polls on election day.
d. increase voter turnout.
*d. increase voter turnout.
According to Prof. Walcott, “politics” can be defined as a solution to the problem of
a. distribution of goods and services.
b. potential conflict.
c. ending dictatorships.
d. achieving domination over others.
* b. potential conflict.
Compared with the 1950s, government’s involvement in the everyday lives of Americans today is
a. about the same.
b. slightly less.
c. considerably less.
d. considerably greater.
*d. considerably greater.
The case of Everson v. Board of Education established the doctrine of
a. the exclusionary rule.
b. protection of flag burning.
c. habeas corpus for non-citizens.
d. full separation of church and state.
*d. full separation of church and state.
The Declaration of Independence claimed certain basic rights for all people, based on the principle of
a. natural rights.
b. greatest good for the greatest number.
c. tradition and precedent.
d. the will of the majority.
*a. natural rights.
According to Wilson and DiIulio, the principal goal of the American Revolution was
a. equality.
b. prosperity.
c. efficacy.
d. liberty.
*d. liberty.
“Using the power of government to assure equal treatment” describes
a. civil rights.
b. federalism.
c. patriotism.
d. civil liberties.
*a. civil rights.
The framers of the Constitution designed an inefficient government because
a. they copied too much from the Articles of Confederation.
b. they knew very little about government.
c. they feared tyranny.
d. compromises always produce inefficiency.
*c. they feared tyranny.
An unfunded mandate is
a. a law passed by Congress but vetoed by the president.
b. a federal law which states must carry out using their own money.
c. a legal requirement that carries no enforcement power.
d. a guy who won’t even split the check.
*b. a federal law which states must carry out using their own money.
The Electoral College is part of the Constitution’s answer to which basic question about government?
a. How powerful will the government be?
b. Who governs?
c. What defines citizenship?
d. How do we protect citizens from the government?
*b. Who governs?
In Grutter v. Bollinger the Supreme Court ruled that
a. racial diversity can be a compelling state interest.
b. affirmative action violates the Constitution.
c. women are not entitled to the same protection as minorities.
d. public universities cannot have affirmative action policies.
*a. racial diversity can be a compelling state interest.
Dividing power between the states and the national government is called
a. dual legitimacy.
b. sovereignty.
c. separation of powers.
d. federalism.
*d. federalism.
The separate-but-equal doctrine was struck down by which court case?
a. Plessy v Ferguson
b. Brown v Board of Education
c. Gitlow v. New York
d. Gibbons v. Ogden
*b. Brown v Board of Education
Generally, the Antifederalists thought that the government created by the U.S. Constitution was
a. too weak to be effective.
b. too democratic.
c. too strong and centralized.
d. too liberal.
*c. too strong and centralized.
According to Prof. Walcott, the most basic purpose of any Constitution is to
a. give power to some to rule over others.
b. place limits on the powers of government.
c. determine which part of government is most powerful.
d. protect the public from the power of demagogues.
*b. place limits on the powers of government.
In Marbury v. Madison, the Supreme Court ruled that
a. the national government is supreme over the states.
b. the right to free speech is not unlimited.
c. escaped slaves must be returned to their owners.
d. the Court itself can declare laws unconstitutional.
*d. the Court itself can declare laws unconstitutional.
In the immediate aftermath of Sept. 11, 2001, the public’s trust in the federal government
a. went up.
b. went down a little.
c. dropped sharply.
d. didn’t change at all.
*a. went up.
In discussing the “culture wars,” your text separates Americans into two groups:
a. the right and the left.
b. Republicans and Democrats.
c. the orthodox and the progressive.
d. the religious and the secular.
*c. the orthodox and the progressive.
“Selective incorporation” means:
a. that certain procedures must be followed in admitting new states to the union.
b. that the U.S. reserves the right to deny citizenship to certain people.
c. that federal rights have been applied to the states, but only one at a time.
d. that the federal government can regulate businesses.
*c. that federal rights have been applied to the states, but only one at a time.
According to your text, Americans believe in political equality, defined as
a. equality of opportunity.
b. equality of economic status.
c. equality of influence.
d. equality of states.
*a. equality of opportunity.
The rights to free speech, freedom of religion, freedom of the press and freedom of assembly are found in
a. the First Amendment.
b. the Fifth Amendment.
c. the 21st Amendment.
d. Article III of the Constitution.
*a. the First Amendment.
The “emergency power” used at the outset of the Civil War is an example of Constitutional change through
a. legislative elaboration.
b. custom and usage.
c. presidential practice.
d. judicial interpretation.
*c. presidential practice.
Members of the U.S. Senate serve terms of
a. 2 years.
b. 4 years.
c. 6 years.
d. 8 years.
*c. 6 years.
In the case of Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education, the Supreme Court
a. ruled that school districts must use techniques like busing if necessary to
achieve racial integration.
b. ruled that public facilities, like transportation and recreation, must be open
to persons of all races.
c. ruled that Southern states no longer had to submit their school integration
plans to the federal government for approval.
d. ruled that the district system used to elect Board of Education members
was racially discriminatory and had to be changed.
*a. ruled that school districts must use techniques like busing if necessary to
achieve racial integration.
only element of the Bill of Rights that has been held to be “absolute” by the courts is
a. freedom of speech.
b. freedom of religion.
c. freedom from cruel and unusual punishment.
d. None of these – no right is “absolute.”
*d. None of these – no right is “absolute.”
The case of United States v. Virginia involved
a. the legality of the death penalty.
b. discrimination against homosexuals in public employment.
c. state vs. federal power to protect the environment.
d. admitting women to VMI.
*d. admitting women to VMI.
When racial discrimination is the deliberate result of the law, we call it
a. de facto discrimination.
b. affirmative action.
c. de jure discrimination.
d. coincident discrimination
*c. de jure discrimination.
The USA Patriot Act was passed in response to
a. incidences of flag burning.
b. terrorism on 9/11/01.
c. the needs of the war in Iraq.
d. fear of the Communist Party.
*b. terrorism on 9/11/01.
According to Madison in Federalist 10, a “faction” is
a. a geographic part of the country, such as a state.
b. a minority whose rights must be protected.
c. a dangerous group that can be either a minority or a majority.
d. a subversive minority that seeks to overthrow the government.
*c. a dangerous group that can be either a minority or a majority.
Many of the constitutional amendments passed in the 20th century tended to fall into a pattern of
a. extending democratic participation rights to more people.
b. placing limits on the power of the police.
c. applying federal law to the states.
d. weakening the separation of powers.
*a. extending democratic participation rights to more people.
The “Meal Deal” of 1790 described in Wasserman resulted in a compromise involving
a. amending the Constitution.
b. the location of the national capital.
c. Washington’s choice of vice-president.
d. the importation of slaves.
*b. the location of the national capital.
The No Child Left Behind program is discussed in Wasserman as an example of
a. cooperative federalism.
b. dual federalism.
c. devolution.
d. minimalist government.
*a. cooperative federalism.
The Grutter and Gratz cases illustrate “judicial activism” in that
a. the Court considered the cases without asking the plaintiffs for permission.
b. the Court ruled that the Congress had no authority in this area.
c. the justices of the Court assumed the role of public policy makers.
d. the justices refused to consider the facts, only constitutional principles.
*c. the justices of the Court assumed the role of public policy makers.
Speech codes
a. are considered unconstitutional by the courts.
b. potentially create a conflict of civil liberties vs. civil rights.
c. have not been allowed since the 19th century.
d. do not cover “symbolic” speech, such as bake sales.
*b. potentially create a conflict of civil liberties vs. civil rights.
In Federalist 51, Madison is primarily interested in defending
a. federalism.
b. political parties.
c. separation of powers.
d. the Bill of Rights.
*c. separation of powers.
The process of returning more of the responsibilities of governing from the national level to the state level is known as
a. dual federalism.
b. devolution.
c. preemption.
d. home rule.
*b. devolution.
Madison and his fellow Federalists believed that the worst kind of tyranny was
a. dictatorship headed by one ruler.
b. tyranny by a majority of citizens.
c. tyranny of the wealthy.
d. the institution of slavery.
*b. tyranny by a majority of citizens.
The primary concern of the legislation known as Title IX is
a. minority rights in employment.
b. the rights of the handicapped.
c. the rights of illegal aliens residing in the U.S.
d. women’s rights in education.
*d. women’s rights in education.
Compared to people in other countries, Americans typically have a low degree of
a. interest in religion.
b. class consciousness.
c. civic competence.
d. sense of civic duty.
*b. class consciousness.