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21 Cards in this Set

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Asylum
the right to be recognized as a refugee and receive legal protection and material assistance. An asylum seeker must demonstrate that his or her fear of persecution in his or her home country is well-founded. (Source: “Protecting Refugees & the Role of UNHCR” pamphlet)
Asylum Seeker
When people flee their own country and seek sanctuary in another country, they apply for asylum – the right to be recognized as a refugee and receive legal protection and material assistance. An asylum seeker must demonstrate that his or her fear of persecution in his or her home country is well-founded. (Source: “Protecting Refugees & the Role of UNHCR” pamphlet)
Conflict Induced Displacement
People who are forced to flee their homes for one or more of the following reasons and where the state authorities are unable or unwilling to protect them: armed conflict including civil war, generalized violence; and persecution on the grounds of nationality, race, religion, political opinion or social group.
Development Induced Displacement
People who are compelled to move as a result of policies and projects implemented to supposedly enhance 'development'. Examples of this include large-scale infrastructure projects such as dams, roads, ports, airports; urban clearance initiatives; mining and deforestation; and the introduction of conservation parks/reserves and biosphere projects.
Disaster Induced Displacement
People displaced as a result of natural disasters (floods, volcanoes, landslides, earthquakes), environmental design (deforestation, desertification, land degradation, global warming) and human-made disasters (industrial accidents, radioactivity).
Economic Migrant
someone who leaves their country of origin for financial reasons, rather than due to persecution or violation of human rights like refugees (Source: “Protecting Refugees & the Role of UNHCR” pamphlet)
Forced Migration
A general term that refers to the movements of refugees and internally displaced people (those displaced by conflicts) as well as people displaced by natural or environmental disasters, chemical or nuclear disasters, famine, or development projects.
Immigrant
someone who takes up permanent residence in a country other than his or her original homeland (Source: “Protecting Refugees & the Role of UNHCR” pamphlet)
Infrastructure
The basic structures of buildings, roads and power supplies which help to organise a society or enterprise.
Internally Displaced Person (IDP)
someone who has been forced to flee his or her home for the same reason as a refugee, but remains in his or her own country and has not crossed an international border. Unlike refugees, IDPs are not protected by international law or eligible to receive many types of aid. As the nature of war has changed in the last few decades, with more and more internal conflicts replacing wars among countries, the number of IDPs has increased significantly. (Source: “Protecting Refugees & the Role of UNHCR” pamphlet)
Legacy
Something that is handed down or remains from a previous generation or time
Migrant
a wide-ranging term that covers most people who move to a foreign country for a variety of reasons and for a certain length of time (usually a minimum of a year, so as not to include very temporary visitors such as tourists, business travelers, etc.) (Source: “Protecting Refugees & the Role of UNHCR” pamphlet)
Ordnance
Military weapons, including supplies for their use and equipment for their maintenance
“Prima Facie” Refugees
Refugees who are recognized as needing human rights protection on a group basis, rather than recognized on an individual basis (for example, a mass movement of refugees across a border during a widespread conflict) (Source: “Protecting Refugees & the Role of UNHCR” pamphlet)
Refugee
someone who has been forced to flee his or her country because of a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular social group; a refugee either cannot return home or is afraid to do so. War and ethnic, tribal and religious violence are leading causes of refugees fleeing their countries. (Source: the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees)
Repatriation
the process of returning to one‟s home country. The majority of refugees prefer to return home as soon as it is safe to do so, after a conflict and the country is being rebuilt. UNHCR encourages voluntary repatriation, or return, as the best solution for displaced people. The agency often provides transportation and other assistance, such as money, tools and seeds. Occasionally, UNHCR helps rebuild homes, schools and roads. (Source: “Protecting Refugees & the Role of UNHCR” pamphlet)
Resettlement
the process of helping a refugee find a new, permanent home when they cannot safely reside in a country of first asylum or return home. The United States resettles more refugees than any other country. (Source: “Protecting Refugees & the Role of UNHCR” pamphlet)
Smuggled People
Are moved illegally for profit. They are partners, however unequal, in a commercial transaction. People who think they are being smuggled may run the risk of actually being trafficked. Even if they are not, their personal safety and well-being on their journey and after arrival are not necessarily the smugglers' top priority. As the borders to favoured destination countries have become increasingly strengthened to resist the entry of asylum seekers, migrants of all kinds have increasingly drawn upon the services of smugglers.
Stateless Person
someone who is not a citizen of any country. Citizenship is the legal bond between a government and an individual, and allows for certain political, economic, social and other rights of the individual, as well as the responsibilities of both government and citizen. A person can become stateless due to a variety of reasons, including sovereign, legal, technical or administrative decisions or oversights. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights underlines that “Everyone has the right to a nationality.” (Source: “Protecting Refugees & the Role of UNHCR” pamphlet)
Trafficked People
These are people who are moved by deception or coercion for the purposes of exploitation. The profit in trafficking people comes not from their movement, but from the sale of their sexual services or labour in the country of destination. The trafficked person may be physically prevented from leaving, or be bound by debt or threat of violence to themselves or their family in their country of origin.
UNHCR
the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees; office established in 1951 to protect the human rights of refugees and provide for their assistance through legal, social, economic aid. (Source: “Protecting Refugees & the Role of UNHCR” pamphlet)