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18 Cards in this Set

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agenda-setting function
they don't tell us so much what to think as what to think about
types of informative speeches
reports, lectures, demonstrations
signposts; transitions
organizational markers that indicate the structure of a speech and notify listeners that a particular point is about to be addressed; connect what was said with what will be said.
internal summary
restates a key point or points in a speech.
persuasion
a communication process of converting, modifying, or maintaining the attitudes, beliefs, or behaviors or others.
social judgement theory
states that when listeners hear a persuasive message they compare it with attitudes they already hold.
anchor
reference point
goals of persuasion
conversion, modification, maintenance
ethos
good sense, good moral character, and good will
ways to show credibility
competence, credibility, trustworthiness, dynamism
logos
building arguments based on logic and evidence
toulmin structure of argument
1.Claim
2.Data
3.Warrant
4.Backing
5.Reservations
6.Qualifier
proposition of fact, proposition of policy, proposition of value
alleges a truth; calls for a significant change from how problems are currently handled; calls for a judgement that assesses the worth or merit of an idea, object, or practice.
cognitive dissonance
unpleasent feeling produced by seemingly inconsistent thoughts. ex. "a student asks her professor for more time one an assignment. the professor says no. the student retorts, "but you gave extra time to Jim. why won't you give me the same extension?" the professor sees herself as a very fair-minded person. faced with this apparent inconsistency in the treatment of two students, the professor feels tense and uncomfortable.
contrast effect (door-in-the-face)
listeners are more likely to accept a bigger second request or offer when contrasted with a much bigger request or offer.
pathos
emotional appeal
different emotional appeals
ethics and emotional appeal, general emotional appeals, fear appeals
monroe's motivated sequence
1.Attention
2.Need
3.Satisfaction
4.Visualization
5.Action