Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/25

Click to flip

25 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Fitzgerald's first professional story sale was "Babes in the Woods," published in the September 1919 issue of The Smart Set.
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
Though its circulation at the time was relatively small at 22,000, The Smart Set was a highly regarded magazine with a sophisticated, literary reputation.
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
In 1936 Fitzgerald wrote a series of confessional articles for Esquire. Collectively called "The Crack-Up" stories, they describe his "emotional bankruptcy" and explore his feelings of failure.
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
F. Scott Fitzgerald mentioned Asheville, North Carolina, in an early story for The Saturday Evening Post, "The Ice Palace" (22 May 1920), and in his third novel for Scribners, The Great Gatsby (1925).
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
In both works, Asheville is referred to as a resort town, a mountain getaway for those who lived in the low lying regions around the South. He later became more familiar with the city through fellow Scribners writer Thomas Wolfe, whose Look Homeward, Angel was about growing up in Asheville (which Wolfe renamed Altamont).
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
In the summer of 1935, Fitzgerald left Baltimore for an extended visit in Asheville.
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
He was concerned about his lungs, and the mountain area of western North Carolina was known for the treatment of tuberculosis.
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
He moved into the Grove Park Inn, a plush resort hotel, where he intended to rest and write stories. There he met Laura Guthrie, a woman separated from her husband and working as a palmist for the hotel.
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
She became his typist and companion for the summer. There was no romance between them, but they spent long evenings together, during which Fitzgerald drank beer and talked about himself
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
Mrs. Guthrie had literary ambitions, and from June to September she kept a journal of her time spent with Fitzgerald. The journal includes an account of Fitzgerald's summer affair with Beatrice Dance, a wealthy Texan staying at the Grove Park Inn, as well as literary advice on such topics as revision, always a major step in Fitzgerald's composition process. In "A Summer With F. Scott Fitzgerald" (Esquire, December 1964), Mrs. Guthrie, now Laura Guthrie Hearne, remembers asking Fitzgerald about his method of revising. He replied,
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
It was also during that summer of 1935 that Fitzgerald met Tony Buttita, an aspiring writer and the owner of an Asheville bookstore. Like Mrs. Guthrie, Buttita kept a record of his conversations with Fitzgerald, which he published almost forty years later in After the Good Gay Times (New York: Viking, 1974).
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
On 8 April 1936 Fitzgerald transferred his wife Zelda to Highland Hospital at Asheville. He moved into Suite 441-443 of the Grove Park Inn for another summer. There he was close to Zelda, but he saw very little of her after he broke his shoulder in a July diving accident
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
It was a dark time for Fitzgerald. Besides his health problems and his worries over Zelda's condition, he was concerned with rising debts and a falling income
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
During this second summer at the Grove Park, he fired a revolver in a suicide threat, after which the hotel refused to let him stay without a nurse. So, he was attended by Dorothy Richardson, whose chief duties were to provide him company and to try to keep him from drinking too much.
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
In typical Fitzgerald fashion, he developed a friendship with Miss Richardson and attempted to educate her, providing a reading list of works he felt it vital that any educated person be familiar with. (Richardson's handwritten list of Fitzgerald's recommendations is in the Bruccoli Collection.)
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
In July of 1937, Fitzgerald went from Asheville to Hollywood, leaving Zelda at Highland Hospital while he tried to become a screenwriter. Zelda was in and out of treatment at Highland until she died in a fire at the hospital on 10 March 1948.
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
The Grove Park Inn has changed its attitude toward Fitzgerald since his days there as a troublesome guest. Today F. Scott Fitzgerald's picture hangs in a gallery of photographs of the great and celebrated who have stayed at the hotel, and his name is mentioned prominently in the hotel's publicity, often before such other famous names as Thomas Edison, Bela Bartok, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. In addition, the inn's new Vanderbilt Wing features meeting rooms known as the Fitzgerald Suite.
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
Francis Cugat's jacket design for The Great Gatsby is perhaps the most famous and intriguing in American literature, as critics have argued over the meaning of Fitzgerald's plea to Perkins in an August 1924 letter, "For Christ's sake don't give anyone that jacket you're saving for me. I've written it into the book." Fitzgerald's comment has not been fully explained, although it may refer to Nick Carraway's statement in Chapter IV: "Unlike Gatsby and Tom Buchanan, I had no girl whose disembodied face floated along the dark cornices and blinding signs...."
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
In April 1924 Country Life magazine published "Ten Houses for Ten Authors," an article in which writer Thomas L. Masson and architect Andrew Avinoff "set out to design a house for each [author] as they knew him from his books." The authors selected included Edith Wharton, Booth Tarkington, Kathleen Norris, Zane Grey, and F. Scott Fitzgerald. The caption for the drawing of Fitzgerald's house reads,
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
The artist confided to us that he enjoyed making this sketch of a house for the author of "The Beautiful and Damned," more than any other. We asked him where the stairways led to. "Like Scott Fitzgerald's stories," came the reply "nowhere in particular." Note the decorative touch of cocktail glasses, maraschino cherries, bottles, and dollar signs, not to mention camels, on the rococo pillars.
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html
The article not only is indicative of Fitzgerald's status as a celebrity author but also shows that his public image during the early years of his career was one of a frivolous, grandiose party-boy--an image he worked to dispel but could never fully erase.
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html
In July 1936 Fitzgerald published "An Author's House" in Esquire magazine. The essay seems in part a response to the Country Life article. The house that Fitzgerald depicts is hardly rococo or extravagant. It is, instead, allegorical of the life of a writer and includes a basement where he buried "my first childish love of myself." And the end of the essay, Fitzgerald concludes, "it's just like other houses after all."
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html
During his apprenticeship in the prep schools and at Princeton, and during his early professional career, F. Scott Fitzgerald had an interest in writing for the stage. He wrote four plays between 1911 and 1914, all of which were performed by a local Minneapolis amateur drama troupe.
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
As a freshman at Princeton, Fitzgerald won the 1914-15 competition for the Triangle Club show with his book and lyrics for Fie! Fie! Fi-Fi!. Although a poor academic showing made him ineligible to perform in the show, his witty lyrics won high praise. The following year he collaborated with Edmund "Bunny" Wilson on another Triangle Club show, The Evil Eye, again winning the competition, again being barred from performing because of his grades. Fitzgerald wrote the lyrics for a third Triangle show, 1916-17's Safety First (written by John Biggs, Jr. and J. F. Bohmfalk), and for the third time academics excluded him from the performances. In addition to these three musicals, he also published at least three plays in Princeton's Nassau Literary Magazine, including "Shadow Laurels" and "The Debutante."
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.
Fitzgerald's interest in dramatic form continued through the early part of his professional career. Entire sections of his first two novels, This Side of Paradise and The Beautiful and Damned, take the form of a play, and in 1923, a full length play entitled The Vegetable was published by Scribners but failed its tryout in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Fie! Fie! Fi-Fi!, Fitzgerald's first major
Facts about Fitzgerald. 29 Jan. 1997. Board of Trustees of the University of South Carolina. 13 Feb. 2005 <http://www.sc.edu/fitzgerald/facts/facts6.html>.