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60 Cards in this Set

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Fade-Out
The shot darkens to black. Modeled after stage lights, one of the first to be used by early editors.
Fade-In
The Shot lightens from black
Dissolve
A brief superimposition of two shots. Used after Fade, but still rater early on.
Wipe
Shot B replaces Shot A with a boundary line moving accross the screen. Like Star Wars. Had to wait for the optical printer to be created for use.
Cut
The most common form of transition in Modern cinema, however was the last to be implemented. Shot A ends and Shot B begins.
The four basic areas of control for Editors
Graphic relations between Shots A and B; Rhythmi c relations between shots A and B; Spatial relations between shots A and B; Temporal relations between shots A and B.
Graphic Match
When the filmmaker links two shots together for purely pictoral qualities.
Editing for Rhythm
Shots said to be edited for rhythm when filmmaker adjusts the length of shots in relation to one nother. Will use shot duration to create a stressed, accented moment; or will use shot duration to deaccentuate an action.
Kuleshov Effect
Any series of shot in the abscence of an establishing shot prompts the spectator to infer a spatial whole on the basis of seeing only portions of the space.
Crosscutting
Also known as Parallel editing. Going back and forth between two different scenes. More on these later.
Temporal relations in Narrative film
Editing usually contributes to the plot's manipulation of story time.
Flashbacks
When the diegesis briefly goes to a point earlier in time. In the classical narrative and classical editing, this is usually denoted by a dissolve.
Flash-Foreward
The editing moves to a future event, then returns to the present.
Elliptical Editing
When the editing presents an action so that it cnsumes less time on screen than it does in the story. Examples are Montage, Fast Motion, Benny Hill chase sequence. Also in transitions such as the Dissolve, Wipe or Fade it is assumed by the spectator that some time has been ommitted.
Cutaway
Another way of Elliptical Editing. A shot of another event elsewhere that will not last as long as the elided action.
Overlapping Editing
If the action from the end of one shot is partly repeated at the beginning ot the next.
Continuity Editing
Classical editing, editing for the story. Hide the edit, smooth flow over the shots.
Axis of Action
Also known as the Center Line or the 180 degree line. The place where the camera can be placed in Continuity editing, certain rules for crossing it. Ensures that relative positions in the frame remain constant, consistant eyelines, and consistent screen direction.
Screen Direction
The movement of a figure in the frame. A Person moving left to right on a street must be matched moving left to right in Continuity editing, otherwise it will disorient the spectator.
Establishing shot
A shot, generally at the beginning of a scene, showing the overall space of the diegesis.
Shot/reverse shot pattern
General pattern in Continuity editing. Show a shot, then show the reverse end of the axis from that shot. Used in dialog, Person 1 speaks, then show an over-the-shoulder/three-quarters shot of Person 2.
Eyeline match
Person 1 is looking at Person2. The eyelines of the people are consistent.
Reestablishing shot
A shot that reestablishes what was established in the Establishing shot. Pattern of editing: Establish, Breakdown(Series of Shot/reverse shot), Reestablish
Match on Action
A person begins standing in one shot, then finishes standing another shot.
Cheat Cut
A edit to hide a small movement by an actor in between the frames. Example: When a character iscloser to another in Shot B than Shot A.
Point-Of-View Editing
Editing uing the Kuleshev effect to make it seem as though we're looking through a character's eyes. Best Hitchcockian example: Rear Window.
Montage Sequence
What is thought of when the word "Montage" is used. Condenscing an extended period of time into a short screen time. Think eighties movies.
Jump Cut
When two shot sof the same subject are cut together but are not sufficiently different in camera distance and angle. A noticable jump on screen.
30 degree rule
Avoide Jump cuts. Every camera Positionbe varied by 30-60 degrees from the revious one.
Nondiegetic Insert
The filmmaker cuts to a metaphorical or symbolic shot that is not in the diegesis of the story.
Expansion
Making an event longer in screen duration than in story duration.
Magazine
The "Mouse Ears" of the camera. Available in 16mm 200 ft (Barely used), 16mm 400 ft. (Most used, extends single shot time to 11:08 min), 16mm 1200 ft. (33:24 min.), and 35mm 1200 ft. (13:20).
Lathem Loops
Slack in the film when going through the camera. Makes it so no break and fire.
Sequence Shot
Enitre Scene in single shot.
Long Take
Part of a scene, or many scens in a single shot. Continuous shot. With the exception of Hong Kong, Aisan directors are Long take directors.
Roger Spottiswoode
Creator of the Content Curve
Content Curve
The amount of time it takes for the spectator to take in everything on the screen.
Interscene Editing
Scene to Scene editing.
First effect to be used in Interscene editing.
A "Curtain" rising and falling, used a mask generally consisting of cloth.
Swishpan
The filmmaker knocks the camera after filming to create a blur effect into the next scene. Used in the Mission Impossible Television Sereies.
V.I Pudovkin
The first to write a textbook on film. Russians were the first to theorize editing.
Montage
Editing in French
Thematic Montage
Also known at the Intellectual Montage. The Editor inserts non-diegetic information to comment on actions.
Intrascene Editing
Editing within the scene.
Dominant forms of film at the begining of Film History
Actualities, "Moving Postcards", Gag films, trick films. Early directors were expected to make one film a week.
Stipulations on crossing the 180 degree line
Can cross if: Camera pans to other end while camera is running, set camera ON axis of action (with either a head-on shot or back on shot), or a cutaway.
Discontinuity Editing
Based off of the Jump Cut. Wants to draw attantion to itself, the anti-continuity editing. Unmotivated Repetition, Interscene not cued Intrascene scrambled, does not preserve space-time. Used in Experimental, Asian, African, Modernist, Rhetorical Documentary films and Music Videos.
Maggie Booth
First to be called an Editor
D. W Griffith
Used a male editor, important to the hisory of editing.
Contrast Editing
A type of Crosscutting, Forcing the audience to see what you're trying to say.
Parallelism
Drawing th audience in, also crosscutting.
Siultinaety
Outcome of one in the outcome of the other. Purely emotional and overdone. Used in action movies (Bomb ticking while hero runs away) and The Untouchables.
Light MOtif
Reintroducing the Narrative.
Graphic Contrast
Does not fit visually
Shooting out of Continuity
Shooting outside of script order. Scene 5 then scene 48 than scene 1, etc.
False Eyeline Match
Filming in two different plces with eyelines matching. A man looks out a window in Arizona and looks out (via POV shot) on a crying puppy in venice.
Eisenstein
Russian Filmmaker of October, directed for "Maimum Collision". The anti Eisenstein is Mikos Jansco
Serial Repetition
The whole action repeating, eample: The washer woman in Ballet Mechanique.
Editing
The joining of strips of film by glue, paste, or, now, digital.
Short End
LIttle pieces of film at begining of reel.