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26 Cards in this Set

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Sans Culottes
were working class revolutionaries
Girondins
A group of leftist National Assembly members who were especially gifted speakers and legislators. They were into Rousseau and got their name because many came from the Gironde.
Feuillant
When the Jacobin club disintegrated many of its members became Feuliants. The Feuillant were more moderate than the Jacobins, and had a majority status in the new National Assembly of 1791. Still, they wrote up a petition to dethrone the King.
Jacques Pierre Brissot
Member of the National Assembly closely associated with the Girondins. He was editor of the Patriote Francais and his writing for this and other publications often had gotten him in trouble with the government. He was locked up in the Bastille before it was torn down. He had also spent time in exile in London and had traveled to the US as part of the anti-slavery society.
Jerome Petiton
One of the National Assembly members who greeted the King and company on their way back to Paris after their failed escape attempt. He became mayor of Paris after Bailley lost his popularity by being involved in the massacre in front of the Hotel de Ville.
Emigres
Were Feudal lords who left the country to escape the revolution. Many maintained their property and were able to continue taxing their serfs in the same manner they did before the revolution by using femiers to collect their taxes.
Jean Paul Marat
A journalist who claimed he slept only two hours a night, spent one hour eating and dressing, and the rest of the day working.  Before he became a journalist, he was a doctor specializing in eye diseases, of which he caught one, and then cured himself of.  At one point when his presses were seized after the Champs de Mars massacre, he hid in the sewers of Paris where he contracted prurigo, a skin disease, which left him with open sores.  He also began wearing a red bandana around his neck which he soaked in vinegar to help his headaches, this, along with his old clothes gave him an odor that made people nauseous.  He once wrote that “in order to ensure public tranquility, two hundred thousand heads must be cut off.”
Manon Roland - A self educated writer who wrote articles and published them under her husband’s name.  She was a fan of Voltaire and Rousseau, the Girondins, civil war, and not a fan of the Queen.
Jean-Marie Roland
Husband of Manon Roland. Married her at 47. Was an inspector of manufactures in Lyons before moving to Paris with Manon. While in Paris joined the Jacobin club.
Declaration of Pillnitz
Written by Emperor Leopold and the King of Prussia announcing that the situation of King Luis XVI was of interest to all of Europe and that they were willing to restore a monarchical system in France.
La Patrie en Danger
Was the state of emergency that the National Assembly put the country in on the 13th of July 1791. This called all men who were able to bear arms to prepare themselves for war with the Austrians.
Sans Culottes
were working class revolutionaries
Girondins
A group of leftist National Assembly members who were especially gifted speakers and legislators. They were into Rousseau and got their name because many came from the Gironde.
Feuillant
When the Jacobin club disintegrated many of its members became Feuliants. The Feuillant were more moderate than the Jacobins, and had a majority status in the new National Assembly of 1791. Still, they wrote up a petition to dethrone the King.
Jacques Pierre Brissot
Member of the National Assembly closely associated with the Girondins. He was editor of the Patriote Francais and his writing for this and other publications often had gotten him in trouble with the government. He was locked up in the Bastille before it was torn down. He had also spent time in exile in London and had traveled to the US as part of the anti-slavery society.
Jerome Petiton
One of the National Assembly members who greeted the King and company on their way back to Paris after their failed escape attempt. He became mayor of Paris after Bailley lost his popularity by being involved in the massacre in front of the Hotel de Ville.
Emigres
Were Feudal lords who left the country to escape the revolution. Many maintained their property and were able to continue taxing their serfs in the same manner they did before the revolution by using femiers to collect their taxes.
Jean Paul Marat
A journalist who claimed he slept only two hours a night, spent one hour eating and dressing, and the rest of the day working.  Before he became a journalist, he was a doctor specializing in eye diseases, of which he caught one, and then cured himself of.  At one point when his presses were seized after the Champs de Mars massacre, he hid in the sewers of Paris where he contracted prurigo, a skin disease, which left him with open sores.  He also began wearing a red bandana around his neck which he soaked in vinegar to help his headaches, this, along with his old clothes gave him an odor that made people nauseous.  He once wrote that “in order to ensure public tranquility, two hundred thousand heads must be cut off.”
Manon Roland - A self educated writer who wrote articles and published them under her husband’s name.  She was a fan of Voltaire and Rousseau, the Girondins, civil war, and not a fan of the Queen.
Jean-Marie Roland
Husband of Manon Roland. Married her at 47. Was an inspector of manufactures in Lyons before moving to Paris with Manon. While in Paris joined the Jacobin club.
Declaration of Pillnitz
Written by Emperor Leopold and the King of Prussia announcing that the situation of King Luis XVI was of interest to all of Europe and that they were willing to restore a monarchical system in France.
La Patrie en Danger
Was the state of emergency that the National Assembly put the country in on the 13th of July 1791. This called all men who were able to bear arms to prepare themselves for war with the Austrians.
What forces began to exercise more power in the National Assembly? Why?
The more leftist sections of the National Assembly were beginning to exercise more power in the National Assembly. These groups were able to gain public support after demonstrators were killed by Bailley and Lafayette on the Champs de Mars and by the growing feeling amongst the populace that the revolution was only benefitting the middle class.
What were the consequences of the revolution taking a more radical turn?
The conservatives in the National Assembly passed a number of decrees trying to reign in the radicals. Some radicals were arrested, radical newspapers were shut down, and demonstrators were shot at.
What led to war with Austria and Prussia? What were the consequences of this war?
The revolutionaries wanted to be able to prosecute the emigres who were living outside of the country, while the monarchists wanted the Austrians and others to come in and save the monarchy. After the beginning of the war in which France was suffering heavy casualties, many thought that the King and Queen had conspired with Austrians to loose the war on purpose. Violent demonstrations were held in Paris.
What decrees did the King veto? How did this get him in trouble?
The King vetoed the decree passed by the National Assembly which was designed to exile counter-revolutionary priests and the decree that allowed a camp of federes to be opened near Paris. These vetoes were very unpopular with the sans-culottes and caused the storming of Tuileries on June 20.
Describe the events of 20 June and 14 July 1792. How do these events demonstrate the deterioration of royal power?
On June 20 the Sans-Culottes organized a march on the assembly and then Tuileries.  They found a way into the Kings residence and smashed their way into his office.  He met with them and they mad him say “long live the nation” and wear a revolutionary style hat. On the 14th of July the king was made to proclaim his allegiance to the nation, and was later asked to burn down a tree which represented feudalism. On both these occasions it is obvious the king has lost power by the way the demonstrators were able to force him to perform certain acts to display his support of the nation. Examples of these acts are putting on the revolutionary cap and pledging his allegiance to the nation.
What lead to the attack on Tuileries of August 1792? How did it impact on the Assembly and on the royal family?
The spark for the attack on Tuileries was a manifesto written by the commander of the army that held that Paris would be completely destroyed if the royal family was not respected and protected and if another attempt was made at invading Tuileries.  It also stated that any soldier who did not fight against the Austrians would be shot and have his home demolished.  As a result the National Assembly was taken over and new commune was put in its place. The powers of the King were suspended and he was jailed, while a provisional council of 6 members was created to rule in his place.  All vetoes that the King had handed down were reversed, and a National Convention was elected based on universal suffrage.