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60 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
  • 3rd side (hint)
Absolute Phrases
A group of words that modifies an independent clause as a whole. An <..><..> is made up of a noun and its modifiers. It may precede, follow, or interrupt the main clause:
Their slender bodies sleek and black against the orange sky, the storks circled high above us.The storks circled high above us, their slender bodies sleek and black against the orange sky.
Adjectives
are words that describe or modify another person or thing in the sentence. The Articles — a, an, and the — are adjectives.
Adverbs
Are words that modify: * a verb (He drove slowly. — How did he drive?); * an adjective (He drove a very fast car. — How fast was his car?); * another adverb (She moved quite slowly down the aisle. — How slowly did she move?)
Determiners/ Articles
are those little words that precede and modify nouns
Clauses
is a group of related words containing a subject and a verb A clause can be usefully distinguished from a phrase, which is a group of related words that does not contain a subject-verb relationship.
Complements
is any word or phrase that completes the sense of a subject, an object, or a verb. As you will see, the terminology describing predicates and <..> can overlap and be a bit confusing. Students are probably wise to learn one set of terms, not both.
Coordinated Adjectives
are words that describe or modify another person or thing in the sentence. The Articles — a, an, and the — are adjectives.
Conjunctions
is a joiner, a word that connects (conjoins) parts of a sentence.
Direct Objects
is the receiver of action within a sentence, as in "He hit the ball." Be careful to distinguish between a direct <..> and an object <…>:
Indirect Objects
identifies to or for whom or what the action of the verb is performed. The direct <…> and <…> object are different people or places or things.
Interjections
are words or phrases used to exclaim or protest or command. They sometimes stand by themselves, but they are often contained within larger structures.
Nouns
is the name of a person, place, thing, or idea. Whatever exists, we assume, can be named, and that name is a <...>. A proper <..>, which names a specific person, place, or thing (Carlos, Queen Marguerite, Middle East, Jerusalem, Malaysia, Presbyterianism, God, Spanish, Buddhism, the Republican Party), is almost always capitalized. A proper <..> used as an addressed person's name is called a <..> of address. Common <..> name everything else, things that usually are not capitalized.
Phrases
is a group of related words that does not contain a subject-verb relationship, such as "in the morning" or "running down the street" or "having grown used to this harassment." A <...> is different than a clause, which is a group of related words containing a subject and a verb.
Predicates
is the completer of a sentence. The subject names the "do-er" or "be-er" of the sentence; the <..> does the rest of the work. A simple <..> consists of only a verb, verb string, or compound verb.
Prepositions
describes a relationship between other words in a sentence. In itself, a word like "in" or "after" is rather meaningless and hard to define in mere words. For instance, when you do try to define a <..> like "in" or "between" or "on," you invariably use your hands to show how something is situated in relationship to something else. <...> are nearly always combined with other words in structures called <...> phrases.
Pronouns
Generally (but not always) <..> stand for <..> or refer to a noun, an individual or individuals or thing or things (the <..>'s antecedent) whose identity is made clear earlier in the text. For instance, we are bewildered by writers who claim something like
Subjects
is the person, place, thing, or idea that is doing or being something. You can find the subject of a sentence if you can find the verb. Ask the question, "Who or what 'verbs' or 'verbed'?" and the answer to that question is the subject. For instance, in the sentence "The computers in the Learning Center must be replaced," the verb is "must be replaced." What must be replaced? The computers. So the subject is "computers." A simple subject is the subject of a sentence stripped of modifiers.
Verbs
(..) carry the idea of being or action in the sentence. * I am a student. * The students passed all their courses. As we will see on this page, verbs are classified in many ways. First, some verbs require an object to complete their meaning: "She gave _____ ?" Gave what? She gave money to the church. These verbs are called transitive. Verbs that are intransitive do not require objects: "The building collapsed." In English, you cannot tell the difference between a transitive and intransitive verb by its form; you have to see how the verb is functioning within the sentence. In fact, a verb can be both transitive and intransitive: "The monster collapsed the building by sitting on it."
ARTICLES
a, an, and the.
NOUN
name of anything,
ADJECTIVES
tell the kind of noun,
VERBS
tell of something being done /action
ADVERBS
tell how things are done
CONJUNCTIONS
join the words together: and, or
PREPOSITION
stands before the noun: in, through, at
INTERJECTION
shows surprise!
PARTS of SPEECH - 8
Article, Noun, Adjective, Verb, Adverb, Conjunction, Preposition, Interjection
PRONOUN
Is a word that takes the place of a noun. Can be in one of three cases: Subject, Object, or Possessive.
WHO v WHOM
Use the he/him method to decide which word is correct: he = who, him = whom
THAT v WHICH
That and which refer to groups or things. That introduces essential clauses while which introduces nonessential clauses.
A v An
use (.. ) when the following letter is a vowel or has a vowel sound.
Adjectives
are words that describe or modify another person or thing in the sentence. The Articles — a, an, and the — are adjectives.
Adverbs
Are words that modify: * a verb (He drove slowly. — How did he drive?); * an adjective (He drove a very fast car. — How fast was his car?); * another adverb (She moved quite slowly down the aisle. — How slowly did she move?)
Determiners/ Articles
are those little words that precede and modify nouns
Clauses
is a group of related words containing a subject and a verb A clause can be usefully distinguished from a phrase, which is a group of related words that does not contain a subject-verb relationship, such as "in the morning" or "running down the street" or "having grown used to this harassment." A review of the different kinds of phrases might be helpful.
Complements
is any word or phrase that completes the sense of a subject, an object, or a verb. As you will see, the terminology describing predicates and <..> can overlap and be a bit confusing. Students are probably wise to learn one set of terms, not both.
Coordinated Adjectives
are words that describe or modify another person or thing in the sentence. The Articles — a, an, and the — are adjectives.
Conjunctions
is a joiner, a word that connects (conjoins) parts of a sentence.
Direct Objects
is the receiver of action within a sentence, as in "He hit the ball." Be careful to distinguish between a direct <..> and an object <…>:
Indirect Objects
identifies to or for whom or what the action of the verb is performed. The direct <…> and <…> object are different people or places or things.
Interjections
are words or phrases used to exclaim or protest or command. They sometimes stand by themselves, but they are often contained within larger structures.
Nouns
is the name of a person, place, thing, or idea. Whatever exists, we assume, can be named, and that name is a <...>. A proper <..>, which names a specific person, place, or thing (Carlos, Queen Marguerite, Middle East, Jerusalem, Malaysia, Presbyterianism, God, Spanish, Buddhism, the Republican Party), is almost always capitalized. A proper <..> used as an addressed person's name is called a <..> of address. Common <..> name everything else, things that usually are not capitalized.
Predicates
is the completer of a sentence. The subject names the "do-er" or "be-er" of the sentence; the <..> does the rest of the work. A simple <..> consists of only a verb, verb string, or compound verb.
Prepositions
describes a relationship between other words in a sentence. In itself, a word like "in" or "after" is rather meaningless and hard to define in mere words. For instance, when you do try to define a <..> like "in" or "between" or "on," you invariably use your hands to show how something is situated in relationship to something else. <...> are nearly always combined with other words in structures called <...> phrases.
Pronouns
Generally (but not always) <..> stand for <..> or refer to a noun, an individual or individuals or thing or things (the <..>'s antecedent) whose identity is made clear earlier in the text. For instance, we are bewildered by writers who claim something like
Subjects
is the person, place, thing, or idea that is doing or being something. You can find the subject of a sentence if you can find the verb. Ask the question, "Who or what 'verbs' or 'verbed'?" and the answer to that question is the subject. For instance, in the sentence "The computers in the Learning Center must be replaced," the verb is "must be replaced." What must be replaced? The computers. So the subject is "computers." A simple subject is the subject of a sentence stripped of modifiers.
Verbs
(..) carry the idea of being or action in the sentence. * I am a student. * The students passed all their courses. As we will see on this page, verbs are classified in many ways. First, some verbs require an object to complete their meaning: "She gave _____ ?" Gave what? She gave money to the church. These verbs are called transitive. Verbs that are intransitive do not require objects: "The building collapsed." In English, you cannot tell the difference between a transitive and intransitive verb by its form; you have to see how the verb is functioning within the sentence. In fact, a verb can be both transitive and intransitive: "The monster collapsed the building by sitting on it."
ARTICLES
a, an, and the.
Three little words you often see
NOUN
name of anything,
As: school or garden, toy, or swing.
ADJECTIVES
tell the kind of noun,
As: great, small, pretty, white, or brown.
VERBS
tell of something being done /action
To read, write, count, sing, jump, or run.
ADVERBS
tell how things are done
As: slowly, quickly, badly, well.
CONJUNCTIONS
join the words together: and, or
As: men and women, wind or weather.
PREPOSITION
stands before the noun: in, through, at
A noun as: in or through a door.
INTERJECTION
shows surprise!
As: Oh, how pretty! Ah! how wise!
PARTS of SPEECH - 8
Article, Noun, Adjective, Verb, Adverb, Conjunction, Preposition, Interjection
ANAVACPI
PRONOUN
Is a word that takes the place of a noun. Can be in one of three cases: Subject, Object, or Possessive.
http://www.grammarbook.com/default.asp
WHO v WHOM
Use the he/him method to decide which word is correct: he = who, him = whom
http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/pronoun.asp
THAT v WHICH
That and which refer to groups or things. That introduces essential clauses while which introduces nonessential clauses.
http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/whoVwhVt.asp
A v An
use (.. ) when the following letter is a vowel or has a vowel sound.