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61 Cards in this Set

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a reference to a familiar literary or historical person or event, used to make the idea more easily understood
Allusion
a comparison of two things made to explain something unfamiliar through its similarities to something familiar
Analogy
the major character in a narrative or drama who works against the hero/ protagonist
Antagonist
a device in which a character in a drama makes a short speech which is heard by the audience but not by other characters in the play
Aside
the process of roughing out the moves to be made by the actors especially as not to "block" another's performance
Blocking
the process by which an author creates vivid, believable characters in a work of art
Characterization
the turning point in a narrative, the moment when the conflict is at its most intense
climax
is the issue to be resolved in the story
conflict
the impression that a word gives beyond its defined meaning.
connotation
the definition of a word, apart from the impressions or feelings it creates in the reader
denotation
the selection and arrangement of words in a literary work
diction
writing intended to explain the nature of an idea, thing, or theme
exposition
a device used in lit. to create expectation or to set up an explanation of later developments
foreshadowing
the array of images in a literary work
imagery
the effect of language in which the intended meaning is the opposite of what is stated
irony
a figure of speech that expresses an idea through the image of another object
metaphor
the prevailing emotions of a work or of the author in his or her creation of the work
mood
a verse or prose accounting of an event or sequence of events, real or invented
narrative
a figure of speech that gives human qualities to abstract ideas, animals, and inanimate objects
personification
this term refers to the pattern of events in narrative or drama
plot
the vantage point or perspective from which a story is told
point of view
the central character of a story who serves as a focus for its themes and incidents and as the principal raionale for its development
protagonist
the portion of a story following the climax, in which the conflict is resoved
resolution
the part of a drama where the plot becomes increasingly complicated
rising action
this term gernerally refers to a poem in which words sound identical or very similar and appear in parallel positions in two or more lines
rhyme
the time place and culture in which the action of a narrative takes place
setting
a comparison, usually using like or as
simile
a monologue in a drama used to give the audience information and to develop the speaker's character
soliloquy
a playwright's descriptive or interpretive comments that provide readers with information about the dialogue, setting, and action of a play
stage direction
a subdivision of a poem consisting of lines grouped together
stanza
something that suggests or stands for something else without losing its original identity
symbol
the main point of a work of literature
theme
both an essay and the point argued in the essay
thesis
a poetic device where the first consonant sounds or any vowel sounds in words or syllables are repeated
alliteration
a person in a story
character
a character in a work of literature whose physical or psychological qualities contrast strongly with, and therefore highlight, the corresponding qualities of another character
foil
a figure of speech in which an overstatement or exaggeration occurs
hyperbole
a theme, character type, image, metaphor, or other verbal element that reoccurs throughout a single work
motif
often considered dynamic since they have the capacity to change or act unpredictably
round character
indistinguishable from their group or class, usually minor characters
flat character
one who changes little if at all
static character
one who is modified by actions and experiences
dynamic character
allows for two or more simultaneous interpretations of a word, phrase, action, or situation, all of which can be supported by the context of a work
ambiguity
the repetition of similar vowel sounds in poetry
assonance
an unpleasant combination of sounds
cacaphony
a pleasant combination of sounds
euphony
a literary work which is amusing and ends happily
comedy
the final unraveling of a plot, the solution of a mystery, an explanation or outcome.
denouement
excessive pride or self-confidence that leads a protagonist to disregard a divine wraning or to violate an important moral law
hubris or hybris
the placement of two things closely together to establish comparisons or contrasts
juxtaposition
the frame or surface of the work may be conventionally realistic, but contrasting elements-such as the supernatural, myth, drea, fantasy-invade the realism and change the whole basis of the art
magical realism/magic realism
a statement that appears illogical or contradictory at first, but may actually point to an underlying truth
paradox
a term designating the appropriateness of a given style to a given situation
register
a work that uses ridicule, humor, and wit to criticize and provoke change in human nature and institiutions.
satire
satire that speaks directly to the reader or to a character in the work
formal/ direct satire
satire that relies upon the ridiculous behavior of its characters to make its point
indirect
a type of drama which is pre-eminently the story of one person, the hero...story leads up to and includes the death or moral destruction of the protagonist
tragedy
the author's attitude toward his or her audience may be deduced from the ____ of his work
tone
may create distance or convey politeness
formal tone
may encourade a friendly, intimate, or intrusive feeling in the reader
informal tone
a statement which lessens or minimizes the importance of what is meant
understatement