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48 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
Alliteration
The repetition of the same consonant sound at the beginning of words
Assonance
The repetition of vowel sounds across syallables or words. Assonance is a characteristic of poetry.
Consonance
Repetition of consonant sounds across syallables or words. Consonance is a characteristic of poetry.
Figurative Language
Language used to create a special effect or feeling. Figurative Language goes beyond the literal meanings of the words used. Similie, metaphor, and personification are examples of Figurative Language.
Hyperbole
Exageration of the effect.
Irony (Situational)
The contrast between what characters or readers might reasonably expect to happen and what actually happens.
Metaphor
Comparison of two unlike objects not using like or as.
Meter
A poem's rhythm.
Mood
The feeling(s) a story gives readers. examples; happy, peaceful, and sad.
Onomatopoeia
Words that sound like what they mean. examples; buzz, crackle, and hiss.
Personification
A form of figurative language in which an idea, object, or animal is given human characteristics. Example; The rock stubbornly refused to move.
Repetition
A figure of speech in which a word, pharase, or idea is repeated for emphasis and effect in a piece of literature.
Rhyme Scheme
The similarity of sound at the end of two or more words.
Rhythm
The ordered ocurrance of sound in poetry.
Sensory Language
Language that appeals to sense, sight, sound, taste, smell, and touch.
Similie
A comparison of two unlike objects using like or as.
Clerihew
a light verse form consisting of 2 couplets, the first line usually containing the name of a person.
Couplet (Rhyming)
Two succsive lines of verse that rhyme and have the same number meterical peet.
Free Verse
Poetry not restricted by the visual connection of metres, rhyme, etc.
Haiku
Japaneese verse form consiting of three lines of 5,7,5 syallables respectively
Quatrain
A stansa or a poem of four lines.
Stanza
A group of lines that are set off to form a division in poetry.
Tanka
A japaneese verse form in 5 lines of which the 1st and 3rd line have 5 syallables and the rest have 7.
Triad
A group of three stanzas.
Alliteration
The repetition of the same consonant sound at the beginning of words
Assonance
The repetition of vowel sounds across syallables or words. Assonance is a characteristic of poetry.
Consonance
Repetition of consonant sounds across syallables or words. Consonance is a characteristic of poetry.
Figurative Language
Language used to create a special effect or feeling. Figurative Language goes beyond the literal meanings of the words used. Similie, metaphor, and personification are examples of Figurative Language.
Hyperbole
Exageration of the effect.
Irony (Situational)
The contrast between what characters or readers might reasonably expect to happen and what actually happens.
Metaphor
Comparison of two unlike objects not using like or as.
Meter
A poem's rhythm.
Mood
The feeling(s) a story gives readers. examples; happy, peaceful, and sad.
Onomatopoeia
Words that sound like what they mean. examples; buzz, crackle, and hiss.
Personification
A form of figurative language in which an idea, object, or animal is given human characteristics. Example; The rock stubbornly refused to move.
Repetition
A figure of speech in which a word, pharase, or idea is repeated for emphasis and effect in a piece of literature.
Rhyme Scheme
The similarity of sound at the end of two or more words.
Rhythm
The ordered ocurrance of sound in poetry.
Sensory Language
Language that appeals to sense, sight, sound, taste, smell, and touch.
Similie
A compariso of two unlike objects using like or as.
Clerihew
A static or comic poem usally in two couplets.
Couplet (Rhyming)
Two succsive lines of verse that rhyme and have the same number meterical peet.
Free Verse
Poetry not restricted by the visual connection of metres, rhyme, etc.
Haiku
Japaneese verse form consiting of three lines of 5,7,5 syallables respectively
Quatrain
A stansa or a poem of four lines.
Stanza
A group of lines that are set off to form a division in poetry.
Tanka
A japaneese verse form in 5 lines of which the 1st and 3rd line have 5 syallables and the rest have 7.
Triad
A chord of 3 tones formed of superimpose thirds.