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25 Cards in this Set

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allusion
a reference to a popular, well-known piece of art, literature, event, person, etc.
-ex:?
Connotation
An association that a word calls to mind beyond the definition
-ex: conotation for the word "snake" is evil or danger
Denotation
the word's objective, independent of the other associations that the word brings to mind ( literal, dictionary definition)
-ex: snake means any of numerous scaly, legless, sometimes venomous reptiles"
Alliteration
Using the same sound at the beginning of multiple syllables/ or accented syllables
ex:fair is foul and foul is fair
dramatic irony
character thinks something, but the reader knows differently
ex:
Situational Irony
Something happens that is unexpected by reader or character
-ex:Lady Catherine tries to stop Elizabeth from getting married to Darcy, but she instead, without realizing it, helps to bring them together
Verbal irony
when someone says something opposite of what they mean (sarcasm)
-ex: When Lady Catherine talks to Elizabeth telling her that her name will be disgraced by everyone if she marries darcy. elizabeth says "that wll be a heavy misfortune, indeed." <verbal irony
allegory
A story or tale with two meanings (literal level/plot, and symbolic level)
-ex: Animal Farm-literal level was the animals running the farm on their own, symbolic level was the Russian revolution
Flashback
WHen the author writees about someonething from the past and then goes into the story at a different period of time
-ex: beginning of a seperate peace-Gene is walking around his old school and has flashbacks of his days there
Elizabethan Order of the Universe
God and Angels are above man
-animals and plants are below man
-horses eat eachother
-owl took down the falcon
>shows disruption of elizabethan order because Macbeth broke the order
Melodrama
a romantic plot carried to the extremes of emotion and weeping, costernation, dismay, disillusion, and resignation to circumstance.
-have happy endings
-ex: pride and prejudice
archetype
like an actual fictional story derived/copied from a real event/situation
-macbeth (the people were based on real royal people and the real royal kingdom)
symbol
something in a novel that represents something or a feeling
-Pemberley was a Symbol of Darcy
Simile
Comparing 2 unlike things using like or as
-
personification
giving a non-human thing human characteristics
-Animal Farm-the animals talked
Russian Revolution
Windmeal=5 year plan of Russian Revolution
Utopia
perfect society
-Utopia by Tomas More-envisioned perfect society
Satire
-making fun of through literatuer means
-Pride and prejudice uses satire because Jane Austen makes fun of the upper class which she was a part of
-Animal Farm uses satire too
tragic hero
a protagonist that is otherwise perfect except for a tragic flaw that eventually brings him down in teh end. the concept was created in greek tragedy
-macbeth
attributes of shakespeare's tragic hero
-noble birth
-responsible for its own fate
-tragic flaw
-doomed to make serious error in judgement
-falls from great heights
-realizes he/she made an irreversible mistake
-faces/acccept death w/ honor
-meets a tragic death
novel of manner
-pride and prejudice
-a fictional work that typifies teh lifestyle, customs, an dvalues, of a particular social class
romanticism
-pride and prejudice
-emphasizes love, feeling, and emotion over rational thinking
fable
a story that teaches a lesson
tragic flaw
characteristic that the character can't overcome >leads to their downfall
-for macbeth it was his greed for power
paradox
a statement that seems to be contradictory but actually presents a truth
-fair is foul and foul is fair