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35 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Constitution
A written or uinwritten system of fundamental laws and principles governing a society.
Oral Tradition
The process of passing down sayings, songs, tales, and myths from one generation to the next by word of mouth.
Journals
A diary, of individual's day by day account of events and personal reactions. A journal provides valuable details that can be supplied only by a aparticipant or an eyewitness. A journal reveals much about the writer.
History
A factual account of events in the life or development of a people, nation, institution, or culture.
Narrative
Writing that tells a story. The story being related may be fictional, as in novels and short stories, or factual, as in historical accounts, autobiographies, and biographies.
Puritans
A religious group of people who set up Plymouth colony. Very harsh and disciplined people.
Lyric Poetry
Brief poems that express the writers personal feelings an thoughts.
Empathy
Capacity for experiencing the feelings and thoughs of another.
Figurative Language
Language that is not intended to be interpreted literally.
Tone
Refers to the writer's attitude toward his or her subject, characters, or audience.
Symbolism
A person, place or thing that has a meanig in itself and also represents someting larger than itself.
Social commentary / Cultural critique
Work of literature that critiques society.
Slave narrative
An autobiographical account of life as a slave.
Audience
A group or listeners or spectators.
Autobiography
A person's account of his or her life.
Aphorism
A short, concise statement expressiong a wise or clever observation or a general truth.
Oratory
The art of skilled, eloquent public speaking.
Repetition
Act or instance of repeating.
Persuasion
An attempt to convince listeners to think or act in a certain way.
Metaphor
A comparison between two seemingly dissimilar things.
Personification
The attribution of human powers and characteristics to something that is not human, such as an object, an aspect or nature, or an abstract idea.
Transcendentalism
An intellectual movement that directly or indirectly affected most of the writers of New England.
Transcendentalist Values
Focused their attention on the human spirits and were interested in the natural world and its relationship to humanity.
Over-soul
Universal soul shared by God, Nature, and Humanity.
Apostrophe
A literary device in which a writer directly addresses an inatimate object, an abstract idea, or absent person.
Walden Pond
The place that Thoreau wrote his materpiece, Walden.
Anti-Transcendentalism
A literary movemnt that essentially consisted of only two writers.
Anti-Transcendentalist Views
They focused on the limitations and potential destructiveness of the human spirit
Allegory
A work of literature in which events, characters, and detals of setting have a symbolic meaning.
Scrivener
A scribe, one who writes or copies writing
Ambiguity
Refers to uncertainty of intention or meaning.
The meaning of Bartleby
A critique on modernization, materialism, and society.
The narrators problematic notion of charity in Bartleby
Charity: That which is not really charity but makes the narrator feel it is such.
Emily Dickinson's Unique Style
Unconventional use of puncuation/capitalization. Brevity of her line/stanzas. Figurative Language.
# of Poems written by Dickinson
1775