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43 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
One of the objectives of access preparation as stated in the text is "to establish restorative margins to minimize marginal leakage of the restored tooth."
True
The "Laws of Access Preparation" listed in the text are so-called because they are always true.
False
Failure to carefully analyze the long axis of the root(s) both in the mesiodistal and buccolingual directions can result in gouging or perforation because premolar roots often are tilted relative to the occlusal plane.
True
The error with the greatest potential for medical and legal damage is entering the wrong tooth because of incorrect dental dam placement.
True
According to the text, the clincian should mark the tooth to be treated with a felt-tip marker before the dental dam is placed if any adjacent teeth might be confused with it.
True
On maxillary anterior teeth, complete pulp chamber roof and pulp horn removal is confirmed by feeling for catches along the walls with a #17 hooked-end explorer on withdrawal from the pulp chamber.
True
The lingual shoulder is the lingual shelf of dentin that extends from the cingulum to a point about 2 mm apical to the canal orifice inside the access preparation of anterior teeth.
True
The lingual shoulder must be preserved during anterior tooth access.
False
A ledge is an iatrogenically created root canal wall irregularity that may impede placement of an intracanal instrument to the apex.
True
In the maxillary central incisor, the cavosurface outline form of the access changes from triangular to a more oval shape as the tooth matures and the pulp horn recedes.
True
An important feature of "ISO-normed instruments" is a defined increase in tip diameter of 0.05 mm or 0.1 mm, depending on the instrument size.
True
"K-files" are made by grinding flutes into a round metal blank.
False
Extraction and Root Canal Treatment have the same primary goal: removal of a source of inflammation, but are at opposite ends of the "conservation" spectrum.
True
Gates-Glidden drills are used mainly in preliminary shaping of the coronal one-third of the canal.
True
Two properties of Nickel-Titanium alloys that allow continuously-rotating instruments to be used in curved root canals are 1) superelasticity and 2) high resistance to cyclic fatigue.
True
A fractured instrument tip left in a root canal, virtually assures post-treatment disease.
False
When an instrument rotates around a curve, larger diameters are more robust and resistant to fracture.
False
Using current high-tech canal preparation techniques, the goal of mechanical preparation of all root canal surfaces is routinely accomplished.
False
Using a straight instrument, however flexible, with a filing motion in a curved canal will result in transportation.
True
The choice of apical preparation design is influenced mostly by the intended obturation technique.
True
Successful root canal treatment is based on these principles" diagnosis and treatment planning; knowledge of anatomy and morphology; the traditional concepts of debridement, thorough disinfection, and obturationl and the coronal restoration.
True
The following four factors are shown to influence success: the absence of a pretreatment periapical lesion, root canal filling with no voids, obturation to within 2.0 mm of the apex, and an adequate coronal restoration.
True
Teeth that are poorly obturated are often poorly prepared.
True
When bacteria are present at the time of obturation, studies show there is a correlation between the quality of obturation and nonhealing.
True
At present there is no effective method for determining whether cleansing and shaping procedures have been effective.
True
The criteria of clean dentinal fillings and/or enlargement beyond the first file to bind at working length have proved to be unreliable.
True
It is not possible to assess the quality of the seal established during obturation with a radiograph, and it is important to remember that no material or technique prevents leakage.
True
At present the consensus is that one-step treatment procedures are acceptable when the patient exhibits a completely or partially vital pulp.
True
When pain occurs as the result of irreversible pulpitis, obturation can occur at the initial visit because removal of the vital tissue will generally resolve the patient's pain.
True
According to Dr. Weeks, the three most important things in endodontics are Obturation, Obturation and Obturation.
False
Apexification is treatment designed to preserve vital pulp tissue in the apical part of a root canal in order to complete formation of the root canal apex.
False
Calcium hydroxide intracanal medication is a quick-acting antimicrobial effective in seconds to minutes.
False
Calcium hydroxide intracanal medication has the extraordinary ability to neutralize the biologic activity of lipopolysaccharide (LPS).
True
It is generally believed that the major cause of RCT failure is survival of microorganisms in the apical portion of the root-filled tooth.
True
Enterococcus faecalis is a gram negative rod.
False
Enterococci species are found in vast quantities in the human intestine.
True
Bacterial isolates from canals of failed RCT (persistance of disease) are essentially the same species isolated from canals before RCT.
False
When making post space a minimum of 2 mm of well condensed gutta-percha and sealer must remain to insure an apical seal.
False
One of the functions of a post is to protect the apical root canal seal from bacterial contamination in case of coronal leakage.
True
The tooth is weakened if dentin is removed to place a larger-diameter post.
True
Kakehashi Et al, showed in their studies that even in the face of gross food impactions that the presence or absence of microbial flora is the major determinant in the healing of exposed rodent pulps.
True
Since the pulp is encased in ridged walls and forms a low compliance systeml a small increase in tissue pressure causes compression of the entire pulp, strangling the pulp and leading to total necrosis.
True
Depending on the severity and duration of the insult and the host capacity to respond, the pulpal response goes from transient inflammation (reversible pulpitis) to irreversible pulpitis, and then to total necrosis.
True