Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/372

Click to flip

372 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
What is the extent of a chronic illness or disability dependent on? (5)
(1)the nature of the condition
(2)the invidual's pre-illness/ disability personaility
(3)the meaning of the illness or disability for the invidual
(4)the invidual's current life circumstances
(5)the degree of family support
NAME
this is depdent on the nature o the conidtion, the invidual's pre-illness/disability personaility, the meaning of the illness or disability for the invivdual, the invidual's current life circumstances, and the degree of family support
the extent of the chornic illness or disability for the invidual
What is functional capacity?
means the invidual's abiility to particapte in everyday activites
NAME
this is the invivdual's ability to particapte in everyday activites
functional capacity
What is disease?
refers to the changes in the structure or function of the body systems
NAME
this refers to the changes in the structure or function of the body systems
disease
What is illness?
is the invidual's perception of symptoms and how he/she and the family respond to thoe symptoms
NAME
this is the indivua;'s perception of symptoms and how he/she responds to those symptoms
illness
What is the differ btwn illness and disease? (2)
(1)disease is the changes in the structure and function of the body system
(2)illness is the invidual's perception of the symptoms and how he/she responds to those symptoms
What is acute?
is a disease or condition w/a sudden onset of symptoms that last a short term
NAME
this is a disease or condition w/a sudden onset of symptoms that last a short time
acute
What is chronic?
is a disease or condition whose symptoms last indefintely
NAME
this is a disease or condition whose symptoms last indenfinetly
chronic
WHat is the differ btwn chronic and acute? (2)
(1)chronic- is the disease or condition whose symptoms last indefinitely (2)acute is a disease or condition w/a sudden onset of symptoms that last a short term
What is congential condition?
is a condition present at birth or that occurs very early life that requires adjustment throughout his or her lifespan
NAME
this is a condition present at birth or that occurs very early in life and requires adjustment throughout his or her lifespan
cogenital condition
What are some examples of cogenital conditions? (2)
(1)babies born w/ more or less limbs (2)spina bifida
NAME
some examples of this condition are babies born w more or less limbs and spina bifida
cogential conditions
What are gentic conditions?
is inhertied disease or condition
NAME
this is inhertied disease or condition
gentic condition
T or F
Down's syndrome is a gentic condition even though it is not inherted but cuased by a mistake in the DNA
true
What are some examples of gentic conditions? (4)
(1)sickle cell anemia (2)down syndrome (3)color blindness (4)muscaular dystrophy
NAME
some examples of this condition include sicke cell anemia, down syndrome, color blindness, and muscular dystrophy
gentic conditions
what is acquired condition or disease?
is condition or disease that is not inherted and acquired late in life
NAME
this is a condition or disease that is not inherted and acquired late in life
acquired condition or disease
What is the differ btwn cogenital conditions, genetic condition, and acquired condition or disease? (3)
(1)cogential condition or disease-- is acquired at birth or early life
(2)genetic condition or disease-is inherted
(3)acquired condition or disease--is not inherted and develops later in life
What is a impairment?
is a loss or abnormaility of psychological, physical, or anatomical structure or function at the system organ level
NAME
this is a loss or abnormality of psychological, physical, or anatomical structure or function at the system organ level
impairment
What is disability?
is an invidual's limitation or restriction of an activity that is the result of a impairment
NAME
this is an idividual's limitation or restriction of an activity that is a result of an impairment
disability
What is the differ btwn disability and impairment? (2)
(1)impairment is the loss or abnormaility of pscyhological, physical, or anatomical structure or function at the system or organ level (2)disability= is an invidual's limitation or restriction of an activity as the result of an impairment
How can near side or far sideness be just a impariment?
when u where your contacts or glasses
NAME
near sideness is this when you where your glasses
jst a impairment
When can near sideness become a disability?
when you take your glasses off and cannot see or drive a car w/out them
NAME
near sideness becomes this when you take off your glasses and cannot see
disability
When does near sideness become a handicap?
when people who are nearsided cannot fly a plane in the airforce
NAME
nearsideness can become this when people who are nearsided are not allowed to drive planes in the USA airforce
handicap
What is a handicap?
it is a disavatange to the invidual resulting from an impairment or disability
NAME
this is a disavtange to the invidual resulting from an impairment or disability
handicap
The world place (1)on people
handicaps
When can blindness be a disability?
when a person cannot drive
NAME
blindness can be this when a person cannot drive
disability
What are some potential threats of chronic illness or disability? (8)
(1)life and physical well being (2)body integrity and comfort (3)indepdence, privacy, autonomy, and control
(4)self concept, full fillment of customary roles (5)life goals and future plans (6)relationships to family, friends, and colleagues
(7)ability to remain in familar surrondings
(8)economic well being
What are some coping strategies for a illness? (5)
(1)denial (2)regression (3)compensation (4)rationilization (5)diversion of feelings
NAME
some of these include denial, regression, compensation, rationlization, and diversion of feelings
coping strategies for a illness
All of the coping for strategies have both (1) side effects
postive and negative
T or F
all coping strategies have either postive or negative side effects
false
What is denial?
is when the person negates relaity
NAME
this is when the person negates relaility
denial
What are some postive effects of denial?
allows you time to adjust to your illness
NAME
some postive effects of this are that it allows you to adjust to your illness
postive effects
What is regression?
is when the person goes back into a earlier stage of development
NAME
this is when a person goes back into a earlier stage of development
regression
What are some postive effects of regression?
allows someone to take care of u while you adjust to the illness
NAME
some postive effects of this is that it allows for someone to take care of your while you adjust to the shock of your illness
regression
What are some negative effects of regression?
if you get stuck in it you are always waiting for somone to take care of you etc and do not take a active part in your own recovery
NAME
some negative side effects of this are that if you get stuck in it you are always waiting for somone to take care of you or to make a descion about your health instead of taking a active part in your own recovery
regression
What is compensation?
is to counteract functional limitations
NAME
this is to counteract functional limitations
compensation
What are some negative effects of compensation?
ex is you have a handicap spot and you tell your self I cannot walk the distance from my car to the buidling when this might be the best excerise you get all day
NAME
a example of this is ex is you have a handicap spot and you tell your self I cannot walk the distance from my car to the buidling when this might be the best excerise you get all day
compensation
What is rationalization?
refers socially acceptable reason's or exuse's
NAME
this refers to socially acceptable resaon's or exuses
rationilization
What is diversion of feelings?
refers to redefining or diverting negative feelings into postive activites
NAME
this refers to redefining or diverting negative feelings into postive activites
diversion of feelings
What are some emotional reactions to chronic illness or disability? (5)
(1)grief (2)fear and anxiety (3)anger (4)depression (5)guilt
NAME
some of these include grief, fear and anxiety, anger, depression, and guilt
emotional reactions to a chronic illness or disability
What is grief?
is a normal reaction that varies amoung inviduals and can lead to adapation
NAME
this is a normal reaction that varies amoung inviduals and can lead to adapation
grief
What is fear and anxiety?
is the reaction to threat, sense of lost control
NAME
this is a reaction to a theart-- the sense of lost control
fear and anxiety
What is anger (for a illness)?
is at self, others, frustration and realization of seriouisness
NAME
this can be at self, others, frustation and realization of seriousness
anger
What is depression?
is helplessness, hopelessness, apathy, and discouragement
NAME
this involves helplessness, hopelessness, apathy, and discouragement
depression for somone w a illness
What is guilt in response to a chronic illness?
they feel like they caused it,(2)are a burden, (3)others feel resentment
NAME
some people respond to a chronic illness by feeling like they caused it, are a burden and others can feel resentment for the person w th e illness. this is refered to as (1)
guilt
What are the stages of chronic illness and disabiltiy through the developmental stages? (5)
(1)childhood (2)adolescence (3)young adulthood (4)middle age (5)older adulthood
What are some issues in chronic illness and disability? (3)
(1)self concept (2)self esteem (3)body image
NAME
some of these issues include self concept, self esteem, and body image
issues of chronic illness and disabilites
What is self concept?
is the percaptions and beliefs about one's own strengths/ weakness and others perceptions of the invidual
NAME
this is the perceptions and beliefs about one's own strenghts/weakness and other perceptions of the invidaual
self concept
What is self estem?
is the evaulative component of an invidual's self concept
NAME
this is the evaulative concept of an invidual's self concept
self estem
What are some functional asepects of chronic illness and disabiltiy? (4)
(1)pscyhological illness (2)lifestyle illness (3)social issues (4)vactional issues
NAME
some of these include pscyholgical illness, lifestyle illness, social issues, and vational issues
functional aspects of chronic illness and disability
What did Aritsolte do for antaomy?
he tried to tranfer knowledge from the discetions of animals to humans
NAME
in history, this person tried to tranfer knowledge from the discection of animals to humans
Atristole
Who is Galen?
he is the father of medicine and he disected animals similar to humans
NAME
he is the father of medince and disceted animals similar to humans
Galen
Who is Andreas Vesalius?
the father of morden medicine and disceted cadavers and challegned the aristole's ideas
NAME
he is the father of morden medicine and disected cadavers and challenged artistiole's ideas
Andreas Vesalius
Who is william Harvey?
was the first English anaomyist to come up with the heart system
NAME
he was the first English anatomist to come up w the heart system
William Harvey
Who is John HUnter?
he worked on the nerves, interventions to prevent aunurisms in the brain, and STDS
NAME
he worked on the nerves, interventions to prevent aunurisms in the brain and STDS
John Hunter
What are (3)ways to learn anatomy?
(1)systatmic (2)clinical (3)regional
NAME
there are 3 ways to learn this: systematic, clinical, and regional
anatomy
What are some functions of the nervous system? (3)
(1)organizing and directing motor responses of the voluntary muscle system, enabling the body to move more effectively as a whole and to achieve purposeful movement (2)monitoring and recoginzing stimuli w/in the evironment and interpreting changes as information be observed or acted upon (3)montioring and coordinating internal body states so that internal organs function as a unit
WHat is the peripheral system made up of ? (2)
afferent and efferent fibers
NAME
this is made up of afferent and efferent fibers
periphearl system
What are the division s of the PNS?
(1)afferent (2)efferent
NAME
this has 2 division-the afferent and efferent
PNS
What are the divsions of the motor nervous system?
(1)somatic nervous system (2)autonomic nervous system
NAME
this has (2)divisions: somatic nervous system and the autonomic nervous system
motor division
What are the divisions of the autonomic nervous system? (2)
(1)sympathetic nervous system (2)parasympathetic nervous system
NAME
this has two divisions: sympathetic nervous system and the parasympathetic nervous system
autonomic nervous system
Disruption of any part of the NS affects (1)
body function in some way
NAME
these are the functional units of the NS and tranmist messages to and from cells
neurons
What does a neuron consist of? (3)
(1)cell body (2)nerve fibers
NAME
these consist of a cell body and nerve fibers
neuron
What are axons?
they conduct nerve impulses away from the cell body to other neurons
NAME
these conduct nerve impulses away from the cell body to other neurons
axons
What are dendrites?
conduct nerve impulses toward the cell body after recieving information from other neurons
NAME
these conduct impulses toward the cell body after recieving information from other neurons
dendrites
What is the differ btwn dendrites and axons?
(1)axons conduct nerve impulses away from the cell body to other neurons (2)conduct nerve impulses toward the cell body after recieving info from other neurons
What is myelin?
is a surrounding fatty sheath provides insulation
NAME
this is a surrounding fatty sheath that provides insulation
myelin
What are tracts?
are bundles of longer axons
NAME
these are bundles of longer axons in the CNS
tracts
What are (3)membranes of the meninges?
(1)dura mater (2)arachnoid mater (3)pia mater
NAME
this has three membranes: dura mater, arachnoid membrane, and the pia mater
meninges
What is the dura mater?
is the outer membrane covering the brain and the spinal cord
NAME
this is the outer membrane covering the spinal cord and brain
dura mater
What is the arachnoid membrane?
is middle membrane of the meninges
NAME
this is the middle membrane of the meninges
arachnoid membrane
What is the pia mater?
is the inner membrane of the meninges
nAME
this is the inner membrane of hte meninges
pia mater
What is the epidural space?
is the space btwn dura mater and the inner surface
NAME
this is btwn the dura mater and the inner surface
epidural space
What is the subdural space?
is the space btwn the dura mater and the arachnoid membrane
NAME
this is the space btwn the dura mater and arachnoid membrane
subdural space
What is the subarchnoid space?
is the space btwn the arachnoid membrane and the pia mater
NAME
this is the space btwn the arachnoid membrane and the pia mater
subarchnoid space
What forms the CSF?
chorid plexus
WHat is the chorid plexus?
forms the CSF
NAME
this forms the CSF
chorid plexus
WHat is the blood brain barrier?
is a structural arrangement of capillaires that selectively determines which substances can move from the blood to the brain
NAME
this is a structural arrangement of capillaries that selectivly determines which substances can move from the blood to the brain
blood brain barrier
What substances move freely across the blood brain barrier?(2)
oxygen and glucose
What is white matter?
makes up the inner part of the brain and the outer portion of the spinal cord and consists of mylein
NAME
this makes upf the inner part of the brain and the outer portion of the spinal cord and contains mylein
white matter
What is gray matter?
makes up the thin outer layer of the brain and the inner portion of the spinal cord
NAME
makes up the thin outer layer of the brain and the inner portion of the spinal cord
gray matter
What is the differ btwn gray and white matter?
(1)gray matter makes up the thin outer layer of the brain and the inner portion of the spinal cord
(2)white matter makes up the inner part of the brian and the outer portion of the spinal cord and consists of myelin
What are (2) types of brain injuries?
(1)traumatic (2)ataumatic
NAME
there are two types of this: traumatic and atraumatic
brain injuries
What is a atraumatic injury?
is a brain injury that is not a accident
NAME
this is a brain injury that is not a accident
atraumatic injury
What is a traumatic injury?
is a brain injury that is a accident
NAME
this is a brain injury that is a accident
traumatic injury
What are some conidtions that can cause atraumatic injuries? (5)
(1)stroke (2)congenital malformation (3)aneurysms (4)infections or inflammations (5)conditions that deprive the brain of oxygen
NAME
some conditions that can cause this type of brain injury include stroke, congenital malformation, aneurysms, infections or inflammations, and conditions that deprive the brain of oxygen
atraumatic injuries
What are some types of traumatic brain injuries? (2)
(1)open head injury (2)closed injury
NAME
there are two types of this: open head injury and closed injury
traumatic injury
A open head injury can also be called a (1)
penetrating head injury
A (1)can also be called a pentrating head injury
open head injury
WHat is a open head injury?
is a injury that pentrates the brain
NAME
these are brain injuries that pentrate the brain
open head injury
What happens when to the brain when you get in a car accident/ slam on the brains really fast? (2)
the brain doesnt stop (2)it hits the skull and the sharp edges of the brain can damage it
NAME
this head injury is hard to tell the effects of
closed head injury
T or F
it is easy to determine the effects of a closed head injury
false
WHat is Cap contra coup french for?
bounce back injury
NAME
this is french for bounce back injury
cap contra coup
What is the Glasgow Coma Scale?
asses the level of consciusness on a continumm ranging from coma to alert
NAME
this asses the level of consciusness on a continumm ranging from coma to alert
Glasgow Coma Scale
What are the ranges of the Glasgow coma scale?
(1)eyes open -is from 1-4
(2)best verbale response= from 1-5
(3)best motor response= 1-6
The total ranges of the Glasgow test are from (1)to (2)measuring the depth of the coma
3-15
The total ranges of the (1)are from 3-15 measuring the depth of the coma
Glasgow coma scale
What does a lower glasgow score indicate?
a deeper coma
NAME
this type of Glasgow score indicates a deeper coma
lower
What does a higher Glasgow score indicate?
a higher level of consciousness
NAME
this type of score on the Glasgow test indicates a higher level of consciousness
higher
What is the Rancho Los Amigos Scale of coginitive functioning?
has 8 levels of arousal and cogintive functioning
NAME
this has 8 levels of arousal and cogintive functioning
Rancho Los Amigos Scale of cognitive functioning
How many levels are there in the Rancho Los Amigos SCale of cognitive functioning scale?
8
WHat does the Rancho Los Amigos SCale of cognitive functioning scale measure?
increasing levels of consciousness
NAME
this measures increasing levels of consciousness
Rancho Los Amigos SCale of cognitive functioning scale
What is the Rancho Los Amigos SCale of cognitive functioning scale used for?
a gross measure of stage and recovery
NAME
this is used as a gross measure of stage and recovery
Rancho Los Amigos SCale of cognitive functioning scale
What is the Rancho Los Amigos SCale of cognitive functioning scale a broad indicator?
the extent to which independent functioning is possible
NAME
this is a broad indicator of the extent to which independent fuinctioning is possible
Rancho Los Amigos SCale of cognitive functioning scale
What does a high score on the Rancho Los Amigos SCale of cognitive functioning scale indicate?
higher functioning
What are some differ names for stroke? (7)
(1)cerebral vascular accident (2)brain storm (3)thrombus (4)embolism (5)hemorrhage (6)ischemic vascular disease (7)TIA
What are some other names for cerebral vascular accident? (7)
(1)stroke (2)brain storm (3)thrombus (4)embolism (5)hemorrhage (6)ischemic vascular disease (7)TIA
What are some other names for brain storm? (7)
(1)stroke (2)cerebral vascular accidents (3)thrombus (4)embolism (5)hemorrhage (6)ischemic vascular disease (7)TIA
What are some other names for thrombus? (7)
(1)stroke (2)cerebral vascular accident (3)brain storm (4)embolism (5)hemorrhage (6)ischemic vascular disease (7)TIA
What are some other names for embolism? (7)
(1)stroke (2)cerebral vascular accident (3)brain storm (4)thrombus (5)hemorrhage (6)ischemic vascular disease (7)TIA
What are some other names for hemorrhage? (7)
(1)stroke (2)cerebral vascular accident (3)brain storm (4)thrombus (5)embolism (6)ischemic vascular disease (7)TIA
What are some other names for ischemiac vascular disease? (7)
(1)stroke (2)cerebral vascular accident (3)brain storm (4)thrombus (5)embolism (6)hemorrhage (7)TIA
What are some other names for TIA? (7)
(1)stroke (2)cerebral vascular accident (3)thrombus (4)embolism (5)hemorrhage (6)ischemic vascular disease (7)TIA
What does TIA stand for?
transient ischemic attack
What are some motor and perceptual consququnces of a brain damage? (8)
(1)movement and coordination balance (2)visual-spaital relations such as trouble swallowing (3)perception (4)vision and hearing (5)touch, taste, and smell (6)eating and swallowing (7)endurance (8)bowel and bladder function
If smell is affected so is (1)
taste
if (1)is affected so is taste
smell
Some (1)and (2)consquences of a brain damage are movement and coordination balance, visual-spatial relations such as trouble swallowing, perecpetion, vision and hearing, touch, taste, and smell, eating and swallowing, endurance, and bowel and bladder functioning
motor and perceptual
If taste and smell are damaged then the (1)is also affected
touch
if (1)and (2)are damaged then touch is also affected
(1)taste (2)smell
What are some examples of how brain injury can affect your endurance?
fatigued easily such as by geting dressed
What are some cognitive consequences of brain damage? (6)
problems w (1)memory (2)attention and concentration (3)self-awareness (4)problems solving and decision making (5)judgement (6)info processsing and concept formation
Some (1)consequences of brain damage include problems in the following areas--memory, attention and concetration, self-awareness, problem solving and decision making, judgement, and info processing and concept formation
cognitive
WHat is sequelae?
refers to addtional problems bc of the accident or stroke
NAME
this refers to additional problems bc of a accident or stroke
sequelae
WHat are some consquences of brain damage? (4)
(1)dysarthia (2)articulation disorders (3)apraxia of speech (4)aphasia
What is apraxia?
is motor planning such as to talk how to mooth your teeth and tonque
NAME
this is motor planning such as to talk how to move your teeth and tongue
apraxia
What are (3)types of Aphasia?
(1)Broca's aphasia (2)Wernicke's aphasia (3)Global Aphasia
NAME
there are three types of this: Broca's, Wernicke's and Global
Aphasia
What is Broca's aphasia?
is trouble w expressive languate
NAME
this is trouble w receptive language
Wernickle's aphasia
NAME
this is trouble w receptive language
Broca's aphasia
What is Wernicke's aphasia?
is trouble w expressive language
NAME
this is trouble w expressive language
Wernicke's aphasia
What is Global aphasia?
is diffucility w receptive and expressive langauge
NAME
this is trouble w recepetive and expressive language
Global aphasia
WHat are some psychological effects of brain damage? (5)
(1)personaility changes (2)anger or irritability (3)non conformance to social norms (4)apathy and depression (5)loss of self esteem
WHat are the periods of development for Cerebral Palsy? (3)
(1)prenatal (2)perinatal (3)postnatal
NAME
this has two periods of development: prenatal and perinatal and postnatal
Cerebral Palsy
What are some causes of prenatal Cerebral Palsy? (7)
is cerebral palsy that is caused by a viral infection,(2) radiation (3) maternal use of etc (4)congential malformation (5)genetics (6)multiples (twins (7)placenta problems
NAME
this type of Cerebral palsy can be caused by viral infections, rediation, maternal use of, congential malformation, genetics, multiples (twins),and placenta problems
prenatal
What are some causes of perinatal cerebral Palsy? (6)
(1)pre-celampsia (2)asphyaxia (3)trauma (4)anoxia (5)intraventricular hemorrhage (6)respiratory disorder of prematurity
NAME
this is when the cord is when the baby is born w cord wrapped around its neck
Asphyxia
What is asphyxia?
is when the spinal cord wraps around the babys neck
NAME
this type of Cerbral Palsy can be caused by pre-eclampsia, asphyxia, trauma, anoxia, intraventriuclar hemorrhage, respiratory disorder of prematuirty
prenatal
What is pre-eclampsia?
is when the mother has high blood pressure during pregrancy
NAME
this refers to when the mother has high blood pressure during the pregrancy
pre-eclampsia
What is itntraventricular hemorrhage ?
is when the baby has stroke
NAME
this is when the baby has a stroke
intraventricular hemorrhage
What are some causes of postnatal cerebral palsy? (6)
(1)TBI (2)viral (3)bacterial (4)meningitis (5)anoxic (6)toxins
NAME
some causes of this are TBI, viral, bacterial, meningitis, anoxic, and toxins
postnatal cerebral palsy
What are some physiological characteristics of cerebral palsy? (6)
(1)spasticity (2)atoxia (3)dyskinesia (4)athetosis (5)choreoathetosis (6)atonia
NAME
some physiological characterstics of this are spaticity, atoxia, dyskinesia, atheosis, choreathestosis, and atonia
Cerebral Palsy
What is dyskinesia?
is incoordination
what is athetosis?
is loose coordination
NAME
this is loose coordination
athetosis
What is atonia?
is lack of muscle tone
NAME
this is lack of muscle tone
atonia
What (3)topographical classfication system for CP?
(1)hemiparesis or hemiplegia (2)paraparesis or paraplegia (3)quadriparesis or quadriplegia
What does CP stand for?
cerebral Palsy
NAME
this can be classifed in 3 topgrpahical systems: hemipareisis or hemiplegia, paraparesis or paraplegia, or quadriplegia
CP
What is sequelae?
a disease or disorder that is caused by a preceding disease or injury in the same individual
NAME
this is a a disease or disorder that is caused by a preceding disease or injury in the same individual
sequelae
What are some sequelae of CP? (7)
(1)Mentally retradation--in at least 50% cases, 15% mild, 35% moderate, and 50% severe and profound (2)fine motor deficits (3)seizure disorder-50% chance (4)vision deficts such as strabismus, field cut, nystagmus, perceptual deficts (5)hearing problems (6)oral motor deficts (7)speech and language deficits
What is epilepsy?
is a symptom of an underlying neurological condition in which neurons in the brain create electrical discharges that cause seizures
NAME
this a symptom of an underlying neurological condition in which neurons in the brain create electrical discharages that cause seizures
epilepsy
What are the differ types of seizures? (4)
(1)Generalized Tonic-Clonic (2)Absence Seizure (3)partial seizures (4)status epilepticus
NAME
there are 4 types of this: generalized tonic clonic, absence seizure, partial seizures, and status epilepticus
seizures
(1)is another name for Grand Mal
Generalized Tonic-Clonic
Generalized Tonic-Clonic is another name for (1)
Grand Mal
Absence Seizure is another name for (1)
Petite Mal
(1)is another name for Petite Mal
Absence Seizure
What are partial seizures?
are focal and complex-partial
NAME
these type of seizures are focal and complex-partial
partial seizures
What is a status epilepticus?
is a seizure that keeps on going
NAMe
this is a seizure that keeps on going
status epilepticus
What does CT stand for?
computed tomography
What does MRI stand for?
magnetic resonacne
What does PET stand stand for?
positron emission transaxial tomography
What are (6)diagnostic procedures for condition for the nervous system?
(1)x-ray (2)CT (3)MRI (4)brain scan (5)PET scan (6)cerebral angiography
What does EEG stand for?
electroheophalography
What is a lumbar puncture?
where they get a CSF tap
What are some different diagnostic procedures for conidtions of hte nervous system? (3)
(1)lumbar puncture (2)EEG (3)neuropsychological test
What are the (3)majors areas of the cortex?
(1)motor cortex (2)sensory cortex (3)associational cortex
What are (2)divisions of the cerebrum?
(1)left (2)right
What is the frontal lobe?
contains motor areas, initiates voluntary movements, and skilled movements
NAME
this contains the motor area such initiating voluntary movements, and skilled movements
frontal lobe
What is the temporal lobe?
is responsible for interpreation of auditory stimuli
NAME
this is responisble for interpreation of auditory stimuli
temporal lobe
What is the occipital lobe?
is responsbible for visual stimuli
nAME
this is responisble for visual stimuli
occipital lobe
What is the Wernicke's area?
is responisble for receptive langauge
nAME
this is responible for receptive language
Wernicke's area
WHat is receptive function?
is the ability to integrate visual and auditory info in order to understand a communication received
NAME
this is the ability to intergrate visual and auditory info in order to understand a communication recieved
recpetive function
What is Broca's area?
coordinates expressive language
NAME
this part of the brain coordinates expressive lanague
Broca's area
What is expressive langauge?
is teh ability to understand the meaning of words
NAME
this is the ability to understand the meaning of words
expressive langauge
What is the thalamus?
is the center of the brain
NAME
this is the center of the brain
thalamus
What is the hypothalamus?
coordinates neural and endocrine activites
NAME
this part of the brain coordinates neural and endocrine activites
hypothalamus
What is the cerebellum?
is responisble for coordination and integration of voluntary movement such as posture
NAME
this is responisble for coordination and integration of voluntary movement such as posture
cerebellum
WHat is the brain stem?
is responsible for involuntary functions
NAME
this is part of the brain is responisble for involuntary functions
brain stem
What is anoxia?
is when the brain receives no oxygen
NAME
this is when the brain receives no oxygen
anoxia
What is hypoaxia?
is when the brain receives to little oxygen
NAME
this is when the brain receives too little oxygen
hypoaxia
WHat is hypertension?
high blood pressure
nAME
this is high blood pressure
hypertension
What is infarct?
is tissue death
NAME
this is tissue death
infarct
What is embolism?
is when a blot clot form in another part of the body and breaks off and goes to the brain
NAME
this is when a blot clot forms in antoher part of the body and breaks off and goes to the brain
embolism
What is edematous?
is swelling
NAME
this is swelling
edematous
What is does TIAs stand for?
transient ischemic attacks
What is TIAs?
is temproary blocking of the cerebral arteries causing slight tempoary neurolgoical deficits
NAME
this is temporary blocking of the cerebral arteries causing a slight temporary neurological deficits
TIAS
WHat is the meningitis?
is the inflammation of hte meninges
nAME
this is inflammation of hte meninges
meningitis
What is encephalitis/
is the inflammation of the brain
NAME
this si the inflammation of the brain
encephalitis
WHat is edema?
swelling
NAME
this is swelling
edema
What is hermatoma?
is sac filled w blood
NAME
this is a sac filled w blood
hermatoma
WHat is epidural hematoma?
is bleeding that occurs in the space in the epidural space
NAME
this is bleeding that occurs in the epidural space
epidural hematoma
What is subdural hematoma?
is a hemorrhage that occurs in the subdural space
nAME
this is hemorrhage that occurs in the subdural space
subdural hematoma
WHat is vertigo?
dizziness
NAME
this is dizziness
vertigo
What is tinnitus?
is rining in the ears
nAME
this is ringing in the ears
tinnitus
What is coma?
is a prolonged unconsciousness in which there is little or no response from the invidual
NAME
this is a prolonged unconsciousness in which there is little or not response from the inviudal
coma
WHat is left-sided damage? (2)
(1)right sided mtoor or sensory paralyis (2)problems w verbal and/or written communction
NAME
people w damage on this side might have problems verbral and/or written commmuniction and right sided motor or sensory paralyis
left-sided damage
What is right-sided damage like?
(1)left-sided motor or sensory paralyiss (2)damage to visual peception or visual-motor integration, and spatial perceptuion
NAME
peopel w damage on this side of the brain might have damage to visual and spatial perception and left sided motor or sensory paralyisis
right sided damge
What is dyskinesia?
is abnormal movemetns
NAME
this is abnormal movements
dyskinesia
What is agnosia?
is the loss of comprhension of sesnations such as the ability to recoginze familiar things
nAME
this is the loss of comprhension of sensations such as the ability to recogzine familiar things
agnosia
What is diplpoia?
double vision
NAME
this is double vision
diplpia
What is confabulation?
is making up answers to questions or events
nAME
this is making up answers to questions or answers
confabulation
What is perseveration?
is when someone gets stuck on a theme or repeating a question or phrase
NAME
this is when someone gets stuck on a theme or repeating a question or phrase
perseveration
WHat is craniotomy?
is procedure in which the skull is surgically opened to remove a foreign object or stop bleeding
NAME
this is procedure in which the skull is surgically opened to remove a foreign object or to stop bleeding
craniotomy
What is hemiplegia?
is paralyis on one side of the body
nAME
this paralyis on one side of the body
hemiplegia
What is paraplegia?
paralyis of only the legs
NAME
this is paralysis of only the legs
paraplegia
WHat is monoplegia?
is when only one limb is paralisised
NAME
this is when only one limb is paralyzed
monoplegia
What is an easy way to remmber the differ btwn an axon and a dendrite?
(1)axon-==a stands for away from cell body. thus they transmit impulses away from the cell body to other neurons (2)dendrites=transmit impulses towards cell bodies from other neurons
What is an easy way to remmber the differ btwn an axon and a dendrite?
(1)axon-==a stands for away from cell body. thus they transmit impulses away from the cell body to other neurons (2)dendrites=transmit impulses towards cell bodies from other neurons
What is an easy way to remmber the differ btwn an axon and a dendrite?
(1)axon-==a stands for away from cell body. thus they transmit impulses away from the cell body to other neurons (2)dendrites=transmit impulses towards cell bodies from other neurons
What is an easy way to remmber the differ btwn an axon and a dendrite?
(1)axon-==a stands for away from cell body. thus they transmit impulses away from the cell body to other neurons (2)dendrites=transmit impulses towards cell bodies from other neurons
What is an aneurysm?
is when an artery raptures in the brain
NAME
this is when an artery raptures in the brain
aneurysm
What is infarct?
tissue death
NAME
this refers to tissue death
infarct
What is the differ btwn infarct, ischemia, and anoxia?
(1)infarct-refers to tissue death (2)ischemia-refers to loss of blood to the brain (3)anoxia-refers to no oxygen geting to the brain
What is the hippocompus?
controls long term memory
NAME
this part of the brain controls long term memory
hippocompus
What is the partial lobe?
controls the senses
NAME
this part of the brain controls the senses
partial lobe
What is the occipital lobe?
controls vision
NAME
this part of the brain controls vision
occiptial lobe
What is the temporal lobe?
controls hearing
NAME
this part of the brain controls hearing
temporal lobe
What is teh Wernickle area?
controls receptive langauge
NAME
this part of the brain controls receptive lanaguage
WErnickle's area
What is Broca'a area?
controls expressive lanaguage
NAME
this part of the brain controls expressive language
Broca' area
What is the differ btwn Broca's and Wernicke's area?
(1)broca's area controls expressive lanuage (2)Wernicke's area controls receptive lanauge
What is the partial lobe?
controls the senses
NAME
this part of the brain controls the senses
partial lobe
WHat is the differ btwn the occiptial, temporal, and partial lobes? (3)
(1)partial lobe controls the senses (2)occipital lobe controls vision (3)temporal lobe controls hearing
WHat is the differ btwn the occiptial, temporal, and partial lobes? (3)
(1)partial lobe controls the senses (2)occipital lobe controls vision (3)temporal lobe controls hearing
WHat is the differ btwn the occiptial, temporal, and partial lobes? (3)
(1)partial lobe controls the senses (2)occipital lobe controls vision (3)temporal lobe controls hearing
What is the limbic system?
controls insticts, drives, and emotions
NAME
this controls insticts, drives, and emotions
limbic system
What is the limbic system?
controls insticts, drives, and emotions
What is the limbic system?
controls insticts, drives, and emotions