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428 Cards in this Set

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What kind of brain injury is a stroke?
atramatic injury
What are two (2)of brain injuries?
(1)atramuatic (2)traumatic
What is the differ btwn atramautic and tramatic brain injury?
(1)atramatic brain damage is caused by interfernece w oxygen reaching the brain (2)traumatic brian injury is caused by an outside force that impacts the head hard enough to cause brain injury
What is an atramtic brain injury?
is brain damage that is caused by interference w oxygen reaching the brain
NAME
this is a brain injury caysed by interference w oxygen reaching the brain
atramatic brain injury
What is a traumatic brain injury?
is brain injury caused by an outside force that impacts the brain hard enough to cause injury
NAME
this is a brain injury caused by an outside force that impacts the brain hard enough to cause injury
traumatic brain injury
Stroke is an example of a (1)type of brain injury
atraumatic
Both atramuatic and tramatic brain injuries are considered (1)injuries
acquried brain
Whay are both atramuatic and tramatic brain injuries considered to be acquired brain injuries?
bc they occur after birth
What is the differ btwn anoxia and hyoxia?
(1)anoxia-is when the brain recieves to little O2 (2)hypoxia-is when the brain receives to little O2
Stroke are also called (1)
cerebral vascular accident
(1)are also called cerebral vascular acciddent
stroke
What is a stroke?
is a sudden alteration in the brain function bc of lack of O2 resulting in weakness or paralysis in a body part as well as other neurological deficits due to decreased blood flow to a part of the brain
NAME
this is a sudden altercation in the brain function bc of lack of O2 resulting in weakness or paralysis in a body part as well as other neurological deficits due to decreased blood flow to a part of the brain
stroke
Stroke is usally a (1)disease
progressive disease
What are (3)diseases that are often associated w stroke?
(1)heart disease (2)hypertension (3)diabtes
NAME
this is often associated w heart disease, hypertension, and diabtes
stroke
What is the most common cuase of a stroke?
thrombus
NAME
this is the most commmon cause of a stroke
thrombus
Thrombus is the most common cause of (1)
stroke
What is thrombus?
is a clot in the cerebral artery that blocks blood flow to the an area of the brain
NAME
this when there is a clot in the cerebral artery that blocks blood flow to an area of the brain
thrombus
What is infarct?
tissue death
NAME
this is tissue death
infarct
What is an embolism?
this is when a clot forms in another part of the body, breaks off, traveling through the blood to the brain and lodging in one of the cerebral arteries blocking blood flow to the brain
NAME
this is when a clot forms in another part of the body, breaking off and traveling through the blood to the brain, and lodging in one of the cerebral arteries--thus blocking blood flow to the brain
embolism
What is hypertension?
high blood pressure
NAME
this refers to high blood pressure
hypertension
What is a common cause of hemorrhage?
hypertension
Hypertension is a common cause of (1)
hemorrhage
NAME
this is a common cause hemorrhage
hypertension
What are (3) causes of stroke?
(1)thrombus (2)embolism (3)hemorrhage
NAME
this has three causes: thrombus, embolism, and hemorrhage
stroke
T or F
sometimes indivudals expereincing a stroke may not know the extent of permanent functional limitations until months after they have occured
true
What does TIAs stand for?
transient ischemic attacks
What is TIAs?
is the temporary blocking of the cerebral arteries that causes slight temporary neurological deficits
NAME
this is the temporary blocking of the cerebral arteries that cuases the slight temporary neurological deficits
TIAs
NAME
this is one of the most common disabling neurological diseases in young adults
MS
What does MS stand for ?
multiple sclerosis
What is MS?
is a multifaceted, progressive condition of the central nervous system w myraid physical and psycholigcal consquences
NAME
this a multifacted, progressive condition of the CNS w myraid physical and psycholigcal consqunces
MS
MS is belived to be a (1)condition
autoimmune
NAME
this is believed to be an autoimmune condition
MS
Explain how the MS is an autoimmune condition?
is when the body's immune system attacks segments of myelin
NAME
this is a autoimmine condition in which the body's immune system attacks segments of myelin
MS
What is myelin?
is a protective sheath that surrounds and insulates message carrying nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord
NAME
this is a protective sheath that surrounds and insulates message carrying nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord
myelin
What is sclerosis?
occurs when myelin surrounding nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord are destroyed and the scar tissue that replaces the areas of myelin that have been destroyed interferes w the transmission nerve impulses causing neurological deficits
NAME
this occurs when myelin surrounding nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord are destroyed and the scar tissue that replaces the areas of myelin that have been destroyed interferes w the transmission of nerve impulses causing neurological deficits
sclerosis
What cuases MS?
the cause is unkown
T or F
the cause of MS is known
false
What kind of people are more at risk for MS? (3)
inviduals w North European heritages and (2)those living in more temperate climates appearing to be more susceptible (3)young adults btwn the ages of 20 and 40 and women
NAME
these inviudals w North European heritages and those living in more temperate climates appear to be more suspectble to this disease and young adults btwn the ages of 20 and 40 (mostly women)
MS
Explain how people get MS
appears to be a interaction of genetic predisposition w environmental factors or exposure to a viruses predisposes individuals to develop the condition
What are the symptoms for MS?
are diverse and unpredictable, appearing in varying combinations and patterns
NAME
people w this disease have symptoms that are diverse and unpredictable appearing in varying combinations and pattern
MS
What are the most common symptoms of MS? (3)
(1)dizziness (2)sensory distrubances including numbness and weakness esp of the lower extermeties (3)unsteadiness (4)viusal probelms or poor bowel and bladder control
NAME
the most common symptoms of this disease include dizziness, sensory distrubances including numbness and weakness esp of the lower extermeties, unsteadiness, and visual problems or poor bowel and bladder control
MS
What is exacerbation?
is when symptoms become worse at times
NAME
this refers to when symptoms become worse at times
exacerabtion
What is paraesthesia?
is the sensation of numbness or tingling in some part of the body
NAME
this is the sensation of numbness or tingling in some part of the body
paraesthesia
What is diplopia?
D for double vision
NAME
this means double vision
diplopia
What is vertigo?
is dizziness or false sensation of circular movement
NAME
this is a dizzness or false sensation of circular movement
vertigo
What is ataxia?
refers to difficulty w coordination and balance
NAME
this refers to difficulty w corrdination and balance
ataxia
What is the intention tremor?
is a particular tremor of the hands that may be present when the indivudal tries to engage in a purposeful activity such as reaching for a glass
What are the symptoms for MS like throughout the disease process?
are diverse and unpredictable, appearing in varying combinations and patterns
NAME
people w this disease have symptoms that are diverse and unpredictable appearing in varying combinations and pattern
MS
What are the most common symptoms of MS? (3)
(1)dizziness (2)sensory distrubances including numbness and weakness esp of the lower extermeties (3)unsteadiness (4)viusal probelms or poor bowel and bladder control
NAME
the most common symptoms of this disease include dizziness, sensory distrubances including numbness and weakness esp of the lower extermeties, unsteadiness, and visual problems or poor bowel and bladder control
MS
What is exacerbation?
is when symptoms become worse at times
NAME
this refers to when symptoms become worse at times
exacerabtion
What is paraesthesia?
is the sensation of numbness or tingling in some part of the body
NAME
this is the sensation of numbness or tingling in some part of the body
paraesthesia
What is diplopia?
D for double vision
NAME
this means double vision
diplopia
What is vertigo?
is dizziness or false sensation of circular movement
NAME
this is a dizzness or false sensation of circular movement
vertigo
What is ataxia?
refers to difficulty w coordination and balance
NAME
this refers to difficulty w corrdination and balance
ataxia
What are the psycgosocial issue of MS? (5)
is a particular tremor of the hands that may be present when the indivudal tries to engage in a purposeful activity such as reaching for a glass (2)manytimes doctors have not known what they have so there is releieve knowing that what they have and may feel disbelieve and shock (3)bc of fatique, people may not understand and call them lazy (4)bladder problems can result in embrassment (5)may withdraw from social and work activities
What is an intention tremor?
is a tremor of the hands that usally occurs only when the person purposefuly tries to engage in a activity such as reaching for a glass of water
NAME
this is a tremor of the hands that usally occurs when the person tries to engage in an activity such as reaching for a glass of water
intention tremor
What is dysphagia?
is trouble swallowing
NAME
this refers to trouble swallowing
dysphagia
How is MS treated? (7)
(1)there is no cure so treatments work more on controlling invdivudal symptoms and preventing exacerbations and complications (2)medications for bladder managment (3)cholinergic medications (4)relaxants (5)steriods to supress symptoms (6)antianxiety agents and antidepressants (7)physical and speech therapy
How is MS treated? (7)
(1)there is no cure so treatments work more on controlling invdivudal symptoms and preventing exacerbations and complications (2)medications for bladder managment (3)cholinergic medications (4)relaxants (5)steriods to supress symptoms (6)antianxiety agents and antidepressants (7)physical and speech therapy
How is MS treated? (7)
(1)there is no cure so treatments work more on controlling invdivudal symptoms and preventing exacerbations and complications (2)medications for bladder managment (3)cholinergic medications (4)relaxants (5)steriods to supress symptoms (6)antianxiety agents and antidepressants (7)physical and speech therapy
People w MS can have (1)
intention tremors
People w MS usally have (1)
MS tremors
What are some vactional issues associated w MS? (6)
(1)they usally experience problems w employment or underemployment (2)mobility, communication, visiion, and cogintive function are common areas that need to be addressed (3)fatigue easily so that may be a problem need a more flexible schedule so that they can take breaks (4)inviducals w balance problems should avoid situations in which falling could be hazardous or use a walking aid (5)Bc heat also affects symptoms, inviduals should avoid hot and humid environments and long periods of exposure to the sun(6)may experience loss of time at work during exacerbatiosn
What are some vactional issues associated w MS? (6)
(1)they usally experience problems w employment or underemployment (2)mobility, communication, visiion, and cogintive function are common areas that need to be addressed (3)fatigue easily so that may be a problem need a more flexible schedule so that they can take breaks (4)inviducals w balance
What are some vactional issues associated w MS? (6)
(1)they usally experience problems w employment or underemployment (2)mobility, communication, visiion, and cogintive function are common areas that need to be addressed (3)fatigue easily so that may be a problem need a more flexible schedule so that they can take breaks (4)inviducals w balance
What is Schizpohrenia?
is a chronic life long mental condition characterized by distoration of reality and disturbances of thought, speech, and behavior
NAME
this is a chronic life long condition charcterized by distoration of reality and distrubances of though, speech, and behavior
Schizophrenia
What are (2)types of symtpoms?
(1)postive and (2)negative
What are postive symptoms?
refers to things that have been added to the indivudal bc of the disease
NAME
this refers to things that have been added to the indivudal bc of the condition
postive symptoms
What are negative symptoms?
are things that been take away from indivudal bc of the disease
NAME
these are things that have been taken away from the indivudal bc of the condition
negative symptoms
What is the differ btwn negative and postive symptoms?
(1)postive symptoms- are things that have been added to the person bc of the condition (2)negative conditions=are things that have been taken away from the indvidual bc of the condition
What are some specfic symptoms of sczhiphrenia? (4)
(1)psychotic symptotms including delusions (such as believing that their thoughts are being controled and hallucinations (2)disorders of thought (30flattening affect (4)disorganized speech and/or behavior
NAME
the specific symptoms of this disease include psychotic symptoms including delusions and/or hallucinations, disorders of thought, flattening affect, and disorganized speech and/or behavior
schizophrenia
What contributes to a person getting schizophrenia?
it appears that multiple gentic and evironmental factors contribute to disturbances in brain function
The first epsidode of schizophrenia usally occurs in (1)
adloscence or young adults
the (1)episode of schizophrenia usally occurs in adolscnce or young adults
first
What are delusions?
are false beliefs
NAME
these are false beliefs
delusions
What is poverty of speech?
in when words spoken convey little meaning
NAME
this is when words spoken convey little meaning
poverty of speech
What is flat affect?
is when indivudals showing little emotional responsivness
NAME
this is when inviduals showing little emotional responsivness
flat affect
What are the different subtypes of schizophrenia?
(1)paranoid type (2)disorganized type (3)catatonic type (4)undifferentiated type (5)residual type
NAME
this has 5 different subtypes: paranoid type, disorganized type, catatonic type, undifferentiated type,and residual type
schiziophrenia
What is the disorganized type of schizophrenia?
is characterized by incohernece of speech, loosening of associations, grossly disorganized behavior, and flat or inappropriate affect
NAME
this is characterized by incohernece of speech, lossening of assocation, grossly disorganized behavior, and flat or inappropriate effect
disorganized schizophrenia
What is the catatonic type of schizophrenia?
includes psychomotor behavior that is either agiated or so retarted that the invidual appears to be in a stupor
NAME
this includes psychomotor behavior that is either agiated or so retarded that the invidual appears to be in a stupor
catatonic type of schizophrenia
What is the paranoid type of schizophrenia?
is characertized by persectuory or grandisoe delusions that are often supported by hallucinations
NAME
this is characterized by persecturary or grandiulse delusions that often supported by hallucinations
paranoid type of sczhiophrenia
What is the undifferentiated type of schizophrenia?
these individuals have prominent psychotic symptoms but the symptoms do not fall into a specific category of szchizophrenia
NAME
these invudals have preominent psychotic symptoms but the symptoms do not fall into a specfic category of sczhiophrenia
undifferentiated type of schizophrenia
What is the residual type of schizophrenia?
is when indivudals
experience at least one schizophrenia episode in the past but show no current prominent psychotic symptoms although some residual signs may remain
NAME
this is when is when individuals
experience at least one schizophrenia episode in the past but show no current prominent psychotic symptoms although some residual signs may remain
residual type of schizophrenia
What are some functional issue of shizophrenia? (2)
(1)impairs personal and social functioning (2)many indviudals are able to maintaing employment after the psychosis has been resolved depending on the success of the treatment
How is Schizophrenia treated? (2)
(1)there is not cure (2)treatment is directed toward reducing and/or controlling symptoms through antipsychotic medications which reduce the psychotic symptoms and help the invidual to function better
What are some psychosocial issues of schizophrenia? (4)
(1)can experience a social stigma and isolation (2)disruption of daily life and future goals (3)finical burden (4)are high risk for substance dependence and abuse, suicide attempts, and homelessness
What are some psychosocial issues of schizophrenia? (4)
(1)can experience a social stigma and isolation (2)disruption of daily life and future goals (3)finical burden (4)are high risk for substance dependence and abuse, suicide attempts, and homelessness
What are some psychosocial issues of schizophrenia? (4)
(1)can experience a social stigma and isolation (2)disruption of daily life and future goals (3)finical burden (4)are high risk for substance dependence and abuse, suicide attempts, and homelessness
What are some vocational issues in schizophrenia?(3)
(1)bc first symptoms are in young adulthood and carrer and skill building are major tasks (2)diffucility w social skills (3)may need extensive job training and training in problem solving, money managment and the use of the pubilic transportation and social skills
What are some vocational issues in schizophrenia?(3)
(1)bc first symptoms are in young adulthood and carrer and skill building are major tasks (2)diffucility w social skills (3)may need extensive job training and training in problem solving, money managment and the use of the pubilic transportation and social skills
What are some vocational issues in schizophrenia?(3)
(1)bc first symptoms are in young adulthood and carrer and skill building are major tasks (2)diffucility w social skills (3)may need extensive job training and training in problem solving, money managment and the use of the pubilic transportation and social skills
There is a tendency to show that (1)are more affected by alcholol than (2)
(1)women (2)men
Who are more affected by alcholol, men or women?
women
How does alcohol act? (3)
intially stimulant bc it supresses the CNS' inhibitory system (2)it also has a sedative effect causing motor incoordination, axtaxia, and impairted pscyhomotor (3)it also depresses the CNS
NAME
this initially acts as a stimulant bc it supressses the CNS's inhbitory system
alcholol
How does alcohol act? (3)
intially stimulant bc it supresses the CNS' inhibitory system (2)it also has a sedative effect causing motor incoordination, axtaxia, and impairted pscyhomotor (3)it also depresses the CNS
How does alcohol act? (3)
intially stimulant bc it supresses the CNS' inhibitory system (2)it also has a sedative effect causing motor incoordination, axtaxia, and impaired pscyhomotor (3)it also depresses the CNS
NAME
this substance also has a sedative effect causing motor incoordination, axtaxia, and impaired psychmotor and depresses the CNS
alcholol
How long does it take for a moderate does of alcholol to clear from the blood?
1 hour
How long does it take for a moderate does of alcholol to clear from the blood?
1 hour
What is ataxia?
is defefective coordination of muscles
NAME
this is defective coordination of muscles
ataxia
What are some harmful affects of short term aclohol use? (8)
(1)impaired judgement (2)confusion (3)mild stupor (4)coma (5)death (6)blackouts (7)motor incoordination (8)ataxia
What are some harmful affects of short term aclohol use? (8)
(1)impaired judgement (2)confusion (3)mild stupor (4)coma (5)death (6)blackouts (7)motor incoordination (8)ataxia
What level of blood alcholol level lead to death?
.51 or higher
Why can alcohol withdrawl be complicated?(2)
bc it can result in (1)seizures (2)delirium
What is a delirium like for people who withdrawl from alcohol?
they experience significant restlessness, gross disorientation, cognitive disruption, and elevation of temperature and pulse rate
NAME
alcholols, during these experience significant restlessness, gross disorientation, cognitive disruption, and elevation of temperature and pulse rate
delirium
How is alcohol dependence treated? (2)
it is a chronic life-long disorder that requires long-term treatments beyond detox (2)involves a wide variety of treatments including individual, group, and family help such as from AA
How does alcohol affect the body?
it affects each and every system of the body
NAME
this is substance affects each and every system of the body
alcoholol
How does alcohol affect the nervous system?
it can cause (1)korsakoff's syndrome (2)Wernicke's disease (3)peripheral neuropathy
NAME
this substance can affect the nervous system by causing Korsakoff's syndrome, Wernicke's disease, and peripheral neuropathy
alcohol
What causes Korsakoff's syndrome?
chronic malnutrition and deficiency of the B vitamins
alcohol can cause (1)
malnutrition and deficiency of the B vitamins
NAME
chronic abuse of this substance can cause malnutrition and vitamin B deficiencies
Alcohol
What is Korsakoff's snydrome?
is characterized by gross disturbances in forming new memories and the indivdual may use confabuation to fill in memory gaps
NAME
this characterized by gross disturbances in forming new memories and the invidual may use confabuation to fill the memory gaps
Korsakoff's syndrome
Korsakoff's syndrome, Wernicke;s disease, and peripheral neuropathy can be caused by (1)
malnaturtion and vitamin B deficiencies caused by chronic alcohol abuse
Korsakoff's syndrome, Wernicke;s disease, and peripheral neuropathy can be caused by (1)
malnaturtion and vitamin B deficiencies caused by chronic alcohol abuse
What is Wernicke's disease?
is characterized by the sudden onset of confusion, double vision and difficulty w balance
NAME
this is charaxterized by the sudden onset of confusion, double vision, and difficulty w balance
Wernicke's disease
Wernicke's disease is uslly related to (1)deficiency
thiamine
Wernicke's disease often occurs in combination w (1)
Kirsakoff's syndrome
(1)is often occurs in combination w Kirsakoff's syndrome
Wernicke's
Wernicke's disease is also called (1)
wernicke's encephalopathy
(1)is also called Wernicke's encephalopathy
Wernicke's disease
What is peripheral neuropathy?
symptoms include numbness, painful sensations, weakness, and muscle cramps and burning pain of the feet may also occur
NAME
symptoms of this disease include numbness, painful sensations, weakness, and muscle cramps and burning pain of the feet may also occur
peripheral neuropathy
How does alcohol affect the heart?(4)
can cause (1)cardiomegaly(2)Beriberi Heart disease (3)can affect both the speed at which the heart beats and its rhythm (4)blood pressure
NAME
this can cause cardiomegaly, beriberi heart disease, the speed at which the heart beats and its rhythm, and blood pressure
alcohol
What is cardiomegaly?
refers to enlarged heart that becomes fibrous and the heart can not pump as well
NAME
this refers to a condition that causes the heart to enlarge and more fibrous. Because of the fibrous tissue, the heart does not pump as well
cardiomegaly
What is Beriberi heart disease?
is a disease that is believed to be caused by a deificeincy of thiamine and individuals w this disease have a high cardiac output
NAME
this is a disease that is believed to be caused by a deficiency of thiamine and individuals w this disease have a high cardiac output
Beriberi heart disease
How does alcohol affect the blood?
it affects the development of red blood cells, white blood cells, and plateltes resulting in anemia, lower resistance to infection, and interfernce w blood clotting
How does alcohol affect the blood?
it affects the development of red blood cells, white blood cells, and plateltes resulting in anemia, lower resistance to infection, and interfernce w blood clotting
What are (3)types of anemia that alcohol can cause?
(1)megaloblastic anemia (2)leukopenia (3)thrombocyopenia
How does alcohol affect the heart?(4)
can cause (1)cardiomegaly(2)Beriberi Heart disease (3)can affect both the speed at which the heart beats and its rhythm (4)blood pressure
How does alcohol affect the heart?(4)
can cause (1)cardiomegaly(2)Beriberi Heart disease (3)can affect both the speed at which the heart beats and its rhythm (4)blood pressure
What are (3)types of anemia that alcohol can cause?
(1)megaloblastic anemia (2)leukopenia (3)thrombocyopenia
What is megaloblastic anemia?
is the presnece of large abnormal red blood cells
NAME
this is the presence of large abnormal red blood cells
megaloblastic anemia
What is leukopenia?
is an abnormal decrease in the number of white blood cells
NAME
this is an abnormal decrease in the number abnormal white blood cells
leukopenia
What is thrombocyopenia?
is an abnormal decrease in the number of platelets
NAME
this an abnormal decrease in the number of platelets
thrombocyopenia
How does alcohol affect the respiratory system?
individuals who abuse alcohol have a greater chance of developing lung cancer because they smoke
How does alcohol affect the musculoskeletal system?
(1)myopathy (2)atrophy (3)osteoporosis
NAME
this can cause myopathy, atrophy, and osteoporosis
musculoskeletal system
What is myopathy?
is a diseaes of the muscles that destroys muscle fibers leading to weakness, pain, tenderness, and swelling of the affected muscles
NAME
this is a disease of the muscles that destroys muscle fibers leading to weakness, pain, tenderness, and swelling of the affected muscles
myopathy
What is atropy?
is when the muscles waste away
NAME
this is when muscles waste away
atrophy
What is osteoporosis?
this is a reduction in bone mass causing bones to become weakened, fragile, and easily broken
NAME
this is a reduction in bone mass causing bones to become weakened, fragile, and easily broken
osteoporosis
How does alcohol affect the GI tract?
(1)increased risk of cancer of the throat and esophagus (2)liver disease (3)esophagel veins (4)alcoholic hepatitis (5)cirohosis (6)pacnreatisi
NAME
this can cause increased risk of cancer of the throat and esophagus and liver disease
alcohol
What is a hepatoxin?
is a substance that is harmful to the liver
NAME
this is a substance that is harmful to the liver
hepatotoxin
Alcohol is a (1)
hepatotoxin
NAME
this is a example of a hepatotoxin
Alcohol
What is esophageal varices?
is when the veins of the esophagus become dilated and twisted
NAME
this is when the veins of the esophagus become dilated and twisted
esophagel varices
What is alcoholic hepatitis?
is inflammation of the liver caused by accumulation of fat on the liver bc of chronic alcohol abuse
NAME
this is a inflammation of the liver caused by the accumulation of fat on the liver bc of chronic alcholol abuse
alchololic hepatitis
What are some symptoms of cirrhosis of the liver?(2)
(1)splenomeegaly (2)jaundice
How can alcohol affect the reproductive system?(3)
(1)can lower the levels of testosterone causing decreased libido and sometimes impotence (2)increases levels of epinephrine and other horomes (3)can cause alcohol fetal alcohol syndrome
How can alcohol affect the reproductive system?(3)
(1)can lower the levels of testosterone causing decreased libido and sometimes impotence (2)increases levels of epinephrine and other horomes (3)can cause alcohol fetal alcohol syndrome
How can alcohol affect the reproductive system?(3)
(1)can lower the levels of testosterone causing decreased libido and sometimes impotence (2)increases levels of epinephrine and other horomes (3)can cause alcohol fetal alcohol syndrome
What is microcephaly?
is abnormal smallness of the head
NAME
this abnormal smallness of the head
microcephaly
What is fetal alcohol syndrome?(5)
characterized by prenatal and postnatal (1)growth retradation (2)micocephaly (3)abnormalilites in the nervous system and facial disfiguration (4)musculoskeletal and cardaic abnormalitlies
What is fetal alcohol syndrome?(5)
characterized by prenatal and postnatal (1)growth retradation (2)micocephaly (3)abnormalilites in the nervous system and facial disfiguration (4)musculoskeletal and cardaic abnormalitlies
What is fetal alcohol syndrome?(5)
characterized by prenatal and postnatal (1)growth retradation (2)micocephaly (3)abnormalilites in the nervous system and facial disfiguration (4)mental retradation (5)musculoskeletal and cardaic abnormalitlies
NAME
this is characterized by prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, micocephaly, abnormalites in the nervous sytem and facial disfirguation, mental retardation, and muscluoskeltal and cardaic abnormalities
fetal alcholol syndrome
Who does sickle cell disease occur in for the most part?
is a herdityory condition that occurs primary in indivudals of black African descent but can also occur in those w Mediterranena ancersty
NAME
this is a heridory condition that occurs primarly in indivudals of black African descent but can also occur in those w mediterranena ancestroy
sickle cell disease
What is hemoglobin A?
refers to normal hemoglobin
NAME
this refers to normal hemoglobin
hemoglobin A
What is hemoglobin S/
refers to abnormal hemoglobin that is protective against melaria
NAME
this refers to abnormal hemoglobin that is protective against melaria
hemoglobin S
What is sickle cell trait?
refers to inviduals that are carriers of the abnormal gene
NAME
this refers to the individuals that are carriers of the abnormal gene
sickle cell trait
What is sickle cell anemia?
is the most severe form of sickle cell disease and is charcaterized by lifelong hemolytic anemia and a wide variety of painful and debilitating vasocclusive e
NAME
this is the most severe form of sickle cell disease and is characterized by lifelong hemoyltic anemia and a wide variety of painful and debiliating vasocclusive events
sickle cell anemia
What is are the hemoglobin S so bad? (3)
bc they become stacked (2)this causes red blood cells to become deformed so that they become a crescent or sickle shape (3)which prevents the blood cells from geting through blood vessels
What is are the hemoglobin S so bad? (3)
bc they become stacked (2)this causes red blood cells to become deformed so that they become a crescent or sickle shape (3)which prevents the blood cells from geting through blood vessels
What are the symptoms of the sickle cell anemia?(8)
(1)symptoms are unpredictable from mild to severe (2)can have sickle cell crisis (3)tissue death (4)heart problems including heart attack and stroke (5)chronic organ damage such as enlarged spleen (6)cardiomegaly (7)fatiue and diffuclty breathing (8)retinopathy
What are the symptoms of the sickle cell anemia?(8)
(1)symptoms are unpredictable from mild to severe (2)can have sickle cell crisis (3)tissue death (4)heart problems including heart attack and stroke (5)chronic organ damage such as enlarged spleen (6)cardiomegaly (7)fatiue and diffuclty breathing (8)retinopathy
What are the symptoms of the sickle cell anemia?(8)
(1)symptoms are unpredictable from mild to severe (2)can have sickle cell crisis (3)tissue death (4)heart problems including heart attack and stroke (5)chronic organ damage such as enlarged spleen (6)cardiomegaly (7)fatiue and diffuclty breathing (8)retinopathy
What is a sickle cell crisis?
this is a manifestation of sickle cell diseaes that occurs when the blood flow to a body part becomes obstructed by rigid sickled red cells
NAME
this is a manifestation of sickel cell disease that occurs when the blood flow to a body part becomes obstructed by rigid sickled red cells
sickle cell crisis
What is retinopathy?
this is when there is damage to vessels in the retina eye results in diminished vision and possible retinal detachment
NAME
this is when there is damage to vessels in the retina eye results in diminished vision and possible retinal detatchment
retionpathy
How is sickle cell disease?
is diagnosed through blood tests
How is sickle cell disease treated?(4)
(1)is a chronic lifelong disease w/out a cure (2) preventive care such as good nutrition and adequate fluid intake (3)some patients are given hydroxyuera (4)hospitlization during crisis treatments
How is sickle cell disease treated?(4)
(1)is a chronic lifelong disease w/out a cure (2) preventive care such as good nutrition and adequate fluid intake (3)some patients are given hydroxyuera (4)hospitlization during crisis treatments
What are the psychosocial issues associated sickle cell disease?(4)
(1)starts in childhood so individuals struggle to maintain a normal life and minimize their difference from their peers (2)bc its a hereditary disease, parents may experience guilt or fear of their loss of their child and become overprotective--thus promoting abnormal dependence in the child (3)the child may learn maladaptive behaviors to get attention (4)adds stress bc the disease is unpredictably never know when going to have another crisis that could result in organ damage
What are the psychosocial issues associated sickle cell disease?(4)
(1)starts in childhood so individuals struggle to maintain a normal life and minimize their difference from their peers (2)bc its a hereditary disease, parents may experience guilt or fear of their loss of their child and become overprotective--thus promoting abnormal dependence in the child (3)the child may learn maladaptive behaviors to get attention (4)adds stress bc the disease is unpredictably never know when going to have another crisis that could result in organ damage
What are the psychosocial issues associated sickle cell disease?(4)
(1)starts in childhood so individuals struggle to maintain a normal life and minimize their difference from their peers (2)bc its a hereditary disease, parents may experience guilt or fear of their loss of their child and become overprotective--thus promoting abnormal dependence in the child (3)the child may learn maladaptive behaviors to get attention (4)adds stress bc the disease is unpredictably never know when going to have another crisis that could result in organ damage
What are the vacational issues in the sickle cell disease?(3)
(1)indiviudals w sickle cell disease must consider not only the physical demands of the job related to stamina but also the role of the strenous exertion in precipating sicke cell crisises (2)must inviduals can perform moderate or even heavy work (3)extereme temperatures and stress at work can trigger sickle cell crisises
What are the vacational issues in the sickle cell disease?(3)
(1)indiviudals w sickle cell disease must consider not only the physical demands of the job related to stamina but also the role of the strenous exertion in precipating sicke cell crisises (2)must inviduals can perform moderate or even heavy work (3)extereme temperatures and stress at work can trigger sickle cell crisises
What are the vacational issues in the sickle cell disease?(3)
(1)indiviudals w sickle cell disease must consider not only the physical demands of the job related to stamina but also the role of the strenous exertion in precipating sicke cell crisises (2)must inviduals can perform moderate or even heavy work (3)extereme temperatures and stress at work can trigger sickle cell crisises
What are the most common body parts affected by sickle cell disease?(5)
(1)chest (2)legs (3)arms (4)back (5)abdomen
What are the most common body parts affected by sickle cell disease?(5)
(1)chest (2)legs (3)arms (4)back (5)abdomen
What is diabtes insipidus?
is a condition in which there is inadequate secretion of ADH from the hypothalamus
NAME
this is a condition in which there is inadequate secretion of ADH from the hypothalamus
diabtes inspidus
What is the most common cause of dibates inspidus?
is damage to the stalk connecting the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland
NAME
this is usally caused by damage to the stalk of connecting the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland
diabtes insipidus
What is polyuira?
refers large urine output
NAME
this refers to large urine output
polyuira
What is polydipisa?
refers to to intense thirst
NAME
this refers to intense thirst
polydipsia
How is diabtes inspidius treated?
by different horomones to correct the diabtes or treat symptoms
T or F
dibates inspidius is curable
true
T or F
dibates mellitus is cureable
false
What is diabtes mellitus?
is a chronic incureable disorder of carbohydrate metabolism and involves the imbalance of the supply and demand for insulin
NAME
this is a chronic incureable disorder of carbs metabolism and involves the imbalance of the supply and demand for insulin
diabtes mellitus
NAME
this is the most common of all endocrine conditions
diabtes mellitus
Over the last two decades the prevalnce of dibates in the USA has (1)
doubled
NAME
this is the leading cause of heart disease, hypertension, blindness, kidney disease, amputation and the nervous system
diabtes mellitus
Diabtes mellitus is the leading cause of (1),(2), (3),and (4)
(1)heart disease (2)hypertension (3)blindness (4)kidney disease (5)amputation (6)nervous system
What causes diabtes mellitus?
no one knows
What is gestational diabtes?
is diabtes that occurs during pregrancy
NAME
this is diabtes that occurs during pregrancy
gestational diabtes
What are some reasons that people do not get enough insuling who have diabtes mellitus?
(1)the islets of Langerhan do not produce enough insulin (2)destruction of insulin before it can be used (3)inability of the body tissues to use the insulin presnt
What is hyperglycemia?
when large amounts of glucose accumulate in the blood
NAME
this is when large amounts of glucose accumulate in the blood
hyperglycemia
What is glycisyuria?
glucose in the urine
NAME
this refers to glucose in the urine
glycosuria
What is polyuria?
refers to large urine output
What is polydipsia?
this refers intense thirst
What is polyphagia?
refers to increase food intake
NAME
this refers to increased food intake
polyphagia
What is diabetic coma?
refers to when there are to many ketones in the body bc the body is breaking down fat in attempt to get glucose
NAME
this refers to when there are to many ketoines in the body bc the body is breaking down fat in a attempt to get glucose
diabetic coma
What are the symptoms of diabtes mellitus?(5)
(1)glycosuria (2)polyuria (3)polyphagia (4)polydipsia (5)diabetic coma
What are (2)types of diabtes mellitus?
(1)type I (2)type II
What does IDDM stand for?
insulin-dependent diabtes mellitus
What does NIDDM stand for?
non-insulin dependent diabtes mellitus
Type I diabtes is also called (1)
IDDM
(1)is also called IDDM
type i
Type II is also called (1)
NIDDM
(1)is also called NIDDM
type II
type II is also called (1)
NIDDM
Type I diabtes accounts for (1)of diabtes while Type II accounts for (2)
(1)10% (2)90%
(1)diabetes accounts for 10% while (2)accounts for 90% of all cases of diabetes
(1)type I (2)type II
What is type I like?
the body produces little to no insulin so that indivudals require external sources of insulin for suvirval
NAME
this type of diabtes is when the body produces little to no insulin so that individuals require external sources of insulin for survival
type I
What is type II diabetes?
is when the body produces insulin but the insulin produced is insufficient to meet the total body needs or the body is unable to use the insulin and external sources may or may not be required and are not needed for survival
NAME
this type of diabetes is when the body produces insulin but the insulin produced is insufficient to meet the total body needs or the body is unable to use the insulin and external sources may or may not be required and are not needed for survival
type II
What is the differ btwn type I and II diabetes?(2)
(1)type I= is when the body produces little to no insulin so that indivudals require external sources of insulin for suvirval (2)type II=is when the body produces insulin but the insulin produced is insufficient to meet the total body needs or the body is unable to use the insulin and external sources may or may not be required and are not needed for survival
(1)is a major risk factor for the development of type II diabetes
obesity
How is diabetes mellitus treated?(3)
(1)there is no cure(2)treatment is directed towards controling the levels of glucose and avoiding complications (3)is controled through diet and the use of insulin injections
NAME
this is the most severe form of diabetes mellitus
type I
NAME
this is the primary mdoe therapy for all people w Type I diabetes
insulin
Can insulin be taken orally for people w type I?
no
T or F
insulin can be taken orally for people w type I diabtes
false
What are (3)types of insulin?
(1)rapid acting insulin (2)intermediate insulin (3)long acting insulin
What are some things that can cause people to consume more glucose which can be a issue for people w diabetes?
(1)stress (2)illness (3)infection (4)and pregrancy
insulin shock is also called (1)
hypoglcemia
(1)is also called hypoglcemia
insulin shock
people w diabetes must learn to balance, insulin, excerise, and blood glucose so that they do not go into (1)
insulin shock
people w (1)must learn to balance insulin, excerise, and blood glucose so that they do not go into insulin shock
diabetes
What is insulin shock ?
when there is too much insulin in the blood
NAME
this is when there is too much insulin in the blood
insulin shock
What are some complications of diabetes mellitus?(8)
(1)affects a large number of body systems (2)heart attack (3)stroke (4)poor circulation in the extermeties (5)amputation bc of infection (6)retinopathy (7)peripheral neuropathy (8)feet tramua such as feet ulcers from not wearing right footwear
What are some complications of diabetes mellitus?(8)
(1)affects a large number of body systems (2)heart attack (3)stroke (4)poor circulation in the extermeties (5)amputation bc of infection (6)retinopathy (7)peripheral neuropathy (8)feet tramua such as feet ulcers from not wearing right footwear
what does MI stand for?
myocardial infarction
MI is jst another name for (1)
heart attack
(1)is jst another name for heart attack
MI
stroke is jst another name for(1)
cerebrovascular accident
(1)is another name for cerebrovascular accident
stroke
What are psychosocial issues in diabetes mellitus?(9)
(1)involves life long multifaceted treatment but it also significantly affects inviduals dail lives and futures (2)is a hidden disability since symptoms are not visible (3)may attempt to hide condition and be embrassed about it (4)others may ignore dietary restriction bc dont want other to know or jst dont follow them (5)can cause depression and discouragement (6)may fear that diabtes can lead to complications such as diabtes (7)must learn to judge calories, carry insulin and eleminate rich foods from their diet (8)may need to avoid situations where there is alcohol (9)may cause marital relationships problems esp in the management of complications should they arise and in having children
What are psychosocial issues in diabetes mellitus?(9)
(1)involves life long multifaceted treatment but it also significantly affects inviduals dail lives and futures (2)is a hidden disability since symptoms are not visible (3)may attempt to hide condition and be embrassed about it (4)others may ignore dietary restriction bc dont want other to know or jst dont follow them (5)can cause depression and discouragement (6)may fear that diabtes can lead to complications such as diabtes (7)must learn to judge calories, carry insulin and eleminate rich foods from their diet (8)may need to avoid situations where there is alcohol (9)may cause marital relationships problems esp in the management of complications should they arise and in having children
What are psychosocial issues in diabetes mellitus?(9)
(1)involves life long multifaceted treatment but it also significantly affects inviduals dail lives and futures (2)is a hidden disability since symptoms are not visible (3)may attempt to hide condition and be embrassed about it (4)others may ignore dietary restriction bc dont want other to know or jst dont follow them (5)can cause depression and discouragement (6)may fear that diabtes can lead to complications such as diabtes (7)must learn to judge calories, carry insulin and eleminate rich foods from their diet (8)may need to avoid situations where there is alcohol (9)may cause marital relationships problems esp in the management of complications should they arise and in having children
What are some vactional issues of having diabetes mellitus?(5)
(1)the demands of the job and indivudal's willness and ability to carry out treatment, and the degree to which the prescribed protocols control their diabtes deteremine the speacil needs of the individual in the work environment (2)activity should be planned so that it is balanced w food intake (3)work in which there is risk of even minor cuts and stratches to the feet should be avoivded bc of the risk of infection (4)employees should be alerted about diabetic coma and insulin shock (5)bc of the complications of posibility of diabtic coma and insulin shock , they should not work in isolation
What are some vactional issues of having diabetes mellitus?(5)
(1)the demands of the job and indivudal's willness and ability to carry out treatment, and the degree to which the prescribed protocols control their diabtes deteremine the speacil needs of the individual in the work environment (2)activity should be planned so that it is balanced w food intake (3)work in which there is risk of even minor cuts and stratches to the feet should be avoivded bc of the risk of infection (4)employees should be alerted about diabetic coma and insulin shock (5)bc of the complications of posibility of diabtic coma and insulin shock , they should not work in isolation
What are some vactional issues of having diabetes mellitus?(5)
(1)the demands of the job and indivudal's willness and ability to carry out treatment, and the degree to which the prescribed protocols control their diabtes deteremine the speacil needs of the individual in the work environment (2)activity should be planned so that it is balanced w food intake (3)work in which there is risk of even minor cuts and stratches to the feet should be avoivded bc of the risk of infection (4)employees should be alerted about diabetic coma and insulin shock (5)bc of the complications of posibility of diabtic coma and insulin shock , they should not work in isolation
What is coronary artery disease?
is a condition in which the coronary arteries become narrowed
NAME
this is a condition in which the coronary arteries become narrowed
coronary artery disease
What is atheroscelrasis?
is when plaque builds up on the inner walls of the blood vessels that supply the heart muscle
NAME
this is when plaque builds up on the inner walls of the blood vessels that supply the heart muscle
atheroscleorisis
What is ischemia?
is when coronary arteries become narrowed and not enough O2 can get to the heart
NAME
this when coronary arteries become narrowed and not enough O2 can get to the heart
ischemia
Lack of O2 to the heart can result in (1)
angina pectoris
lack of (1)to the heart can result in angina pectoris
O2
What is angina pectoris?
refers to chest pain bc of lack of O2
NAME
this is chest pain bc of a lack of O2
angina pectoris
angina is often triggered by (1)
physical activity
What often triggers angina?
physical activity
Why does angina often triggered by physical activity?
bc the heart's muscle need to O2 is the greatest during physical activty
What are (2)types of angina (?
(1)stable angina (2)unstable angina
What is stable angina?
is chest pain that occurs only when demands are placed on the heart and goes away w rest
NAME
this is chest pain that occurs only when demands are placed on the heart and goes away w rest
stable angina
What is unstable angina?
is chest pain that occurs at rest and is more prolonged frequent and severe
NAME
this is chest pain that occurs at rest and is more prolonged frequent and severe
unstable angina
How can MI be found?(3)
(1)lab tests (2)ECG (3)stress tests
What is anoxia?
when the tisssue recieves no O2
NAME
this refers to when tissue receives no O2
anoxia
What is MI?
is when heart tissue receives no O2 and starts to die
NAME
this refers to when heart tissue receives no O2 and starts to die
MI
T or F
all individuals w angina go on to develop MI
false
What are some things that can cause a MI?(3)
(1)atheroscleoris (2)thrombus (3)embolus
What is a thrombus?
blot clot
NAME
this is a blot clot
thrombus
NAME
this can be caused by atheroscleoris, thrombus, and embolus
thrombus
MI can result in (1)
arrhythmia
what is arrhythmia?
irregular heartbeat
NAME
this is a irregular heartbeat
arrhythmia
MI require (1)
immediate medially attention
How are MI's treated when they are occuring?(3)
(1)treatment focuses on stabilizing the condition, relieving pain, and preventing sudden death (2)narcotics can be prescribed for the pain (3) thrombolytic may be give to dissolve clots, and/or anticoagulants may be given to decrease the likeihood of another clot
How are MI's treated when they are occuring?(3)
(1)treatment focuses on stabilizing the condition, relieving pain, and preventing sudden death (2)narcotics can be prescribed for the pain (3) thrombolytic may be give to dissolve clots, and/or anticoagulants may be given to decrease the likeihood of another clot (4)oxygen may be given
How are MI treated after the emergency room?(3)
they are placed in the CCU (2)the goal of treatment is to limit the size of the heart damage, promote electrical stability of the heart, promote comfort, and additional damage (3)after CCU, individuals must undergo lifestyle changes including dietary restrictions, smoking cessation, and graduated ex cerise training
What is hypoxemia?
is lowered oxygen in the blood
NAME
this is lowered oxygen in the blood
hypoexmia
How are MI treated after the emergency room?(3)
they are placed in the CCU (2)the goal of treatment is to limit the size of the heart damage, promote electrical stability of the heart, promote comfort, and additional damage (3)after CCU, individuals must undergo lifestyle changes including dietary restrictions, smoking cessation, and graduated ex cerise training
What is energy?
is expressed in terms of calories per min (2)based on the one liter of O2 equalling 5 calories
NAME
this is expressed in terms of calories per min and based on one liter of O2 equaling 5 calories
energy
How is functional capacity estimated?
in METS
How is functional capacity estimated?
in METS
What does METs stand for?
metabolic equivilants
What is MET?
is the unit or level used to estimate the O2 requirements to perform a task
NAME
this is the unit or level used to estimate the O2 requirements to perform a task
METS
What are some psychosocial issues w MI?(5)
(1)the realization that death could have occured and the threat of sudden death, may result in severe depression and anxiety (2)some may deny the situation (which could be postive)(3)bc of the possiblity of sudden death and another heart attack, family members and friends may become overprotective --thus inhbiting the person from reaching their full capacity (3)family members may become angery, resentful, or fustrated or blame indivudals for their behavior that caused the heart attack such as not excerising (4)the person may experience guilt, low-esteem and self blame for their behaviors (5)sexual readjustment may a issue bc some of heart drugs cause may cause impair sexual dysfunction or fear that the activity is too stressful
What are some psychosocial issues w MI?(5)
(1)the realization that death could have occured and the threat of sudden death, may result in severe depression and anxiety (2)some may deny the situation (which could be postive)(3)bc of the possiblity of sudden death and another heart attack, family members and friends may become overprotective --thus inhbiting the person from reaching their full capacity (3)family members may become angery, resentful, or fustrated or blame indivudals for their behavior that caused the heart attack such as not excerising (4)the person may experience guilt, low-esteem and self blame for their behaviors (5)sexual readjustment may a issue bc some of heart drugs cause may cause impair sexual
What are some vactional issues of a MI?(4)
(1)after rehabiliation most people can return to moderate levels of activity (2)works should not exceed their limits (3)bc of stress that exterme temperatures can cuase on the heart, they should be avoided (4)stress at work may also be a issue
What are some vactional issues of a MI?(4)
(1)after rehabiliation most people can return to moderate levels of activity (2)works should not exceed their limits (3)bc of stress that exterme temperatures can cuase on the heart, they should be avoided (4)stress at work may also be a issue
How many rheumatoid conditions are there?
over 105
There are over (1)classifed rheumatoid conditions
105
Rheumatoid conditions are considerd (1)
autoimmuune conditions
(1)are also considerd autoimmune conditions
rheumatoid
What are autoimmune conditions?
are thought to be caused by an autoimmune response in which the body's immune system fail's to regonize its own body's tissue and attacks itself
NAME
this is a conditoin that is are thought to be caused by an autoimmune response in which the body's immune system fail's to regonize its own body's tissue and attacks itself
autoimmune condition
What are some common characteristics of rheumatic conditions?(4)
(1)pain (2)inflammation (3)fatigue (4)loss of motion of joints
NAME
some common charcertistics of this condition includes pain, inflammation, fatigue, and loss of motion of joints
rheumatoid conditions
What is arthritis?
is a general term used for the inflamation of the joints
NAME
this is a general term used for the inflammation of the joints
arthritis
What is myositis?
is the inflammation of the muscle
NAME
this is the inflammation of the muscle
myositis
What are the effects of rheumatoid conditions like?
symptoms are unpredictable and diverse ranging from mild to severe
What is rheumatoid arthritis?
is a chronic progressive systemtic disorder that causes signifcant pain, joint destruction and disability
NAME
this is a chronic progressive systematic disorder that causes significant pain, joint destruction and disability
rheumatoid arthritis
What is rheumatoid arthritis characertized by?
inflammation and swelling of the synovial joints resulting in pain, stiffness, and deformity
NAME
this is characterized by inflammation and swelling of the synovial joints resulting in pain, stiffness, and deformity
rhemuatoid arthritis
NAME
this is one of the most common rehuamtoid conditions
rheumatoid arthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common (1)conditions
rheumatoid
What is a systematic disease?
is a disease that affects other body systems
nAME
this is a disease that affects other body systems
systematic disease
What are the symptoms of rehumatoid arthritis ?(6)
by the inflammatory process may alter other organ functions (2)experience fatigue (3)wieght loss (4)joint deformity (5)fever (6)series of remission
What are the symptoms of rehumatoid arthritis ?(6)
by the inflammatory process may alter other organ functions (2)experience fatigue (3)wieght loss (4)joint deformity (5)fever (6)series of remission
What is pannus?
is scar tissue
NAME
this refers to scar tissue
pannus
Explain how rheumatoid arthritis progresses(4)
the synovial membrane of the joint becomes inflammed causing warmth, pain, and swelling (2)pannus forms (scar tissue) (3)the pannus interferes w the absorbtion of nutrients--thereby, leading to erosion and joint destruction (4)pannus becomes tough and fibrous resulting in anklyisosis
Explain how rheumatoid arthritis progresses(4)
the synovial membrane of the joint becomes inflammed causing warmth, pain, and swelling (2)pannus forms (scar tissue) (3)the pannus interferes w the absorbtion of nutrients--thereby, leading to erosion and joint destruction (4)pannus becomes tough and fibrous resulting in anklyisosis
Explain how rheumatoid arthritis progresses(4)
the synovial membrane of the joint becomes inflammed causing warmth, pain, and swelling (2)pannus forms (scar tissue) (3)the pannus interferes w the absorbtion of nutrients--thereby, leading to erosion and joint destruction (4)pannus becomes tough and fibrous resulting in anklyisosis
What is ankylosis?
refers to stiffness and fixation of the joint
NAME
this refers to stiffness and fixation of the joint
anklyosis
What are the most common joints affected in rheumatoid arthritis?(5)
(1)wrists (2)ankles (3)knees (4)elbows (5)joints of the fingers and toes
How are the joint affected w people who have rheumatoid arthis?
usally systematically meaning both knees rather than one knee are affected
How is rheumatoid arthritis treated?(8)
there is no cure (2)goal of treatments is to induce and maintain remission (3)excerise directed toward strengthening and increasing flexiablity of muscles (4)rest during acute phases of condition (5)thermal treatment-to releieve pain (6)occupational and physical therpaist (7)medications (8)synovectomy (8)arthriplasty
How is rheumatoid arthritis treated?(8)
there is no cure (2)goal of treatments is to induce and maintain remission (3)excerise directed toward strengthening and increasing flexiablity of muscles (4)rest during acute phases of condition (5)thermal treatment-to releieve pain (6)occupational and physical therpaist (7)medications (8)synovectomy (8)arthriplasty
How is rheumatoid arthritis treated?(8)
there is no cure (2)goal of treatments is to induce and maintain remission (3)excerise directed toward strengthening and increasing flexiablity of muscles (4)rest during acute phases of condition (5)thermal treatment-to releieve pain (6)occupational and physical therpaist (7)medications (8)synovectomy (8)arthriplasty
How is rheumatoid arthritis treated?(8)
there is no cure (2)goal of treatments is to induce and maintain remission (3)excerise directed toward strengthening and increasing flexiablity of muscles (4)rest during acute phases of condition (5)thermal treatment-to releieve pain (6)occupational and physical therpaist (7)medications (8)synovectomy (8)arthriplasty
What are some thermal treatments?
refers to applications of either or cold for pain
NAME
this refers to applications of either hot or cold for pain
thermal treatments
What are some thermal treatments that can be used for rheumatoid arthritis?
(1)hydrotherapy (2)paraffin baths
What are some medications that can be prescribed for rheumatoid arthritis?
(1)NSAIDS (2)corticosertiods (3)disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDS)
What does DMARDS stand for?
disease modifying antirheumatic drugs
NAME
these are just examples of the drugs that can be used to treat this--NSAIDS, cortocosteriods, and DMARDS
rheumatoid arthritis
Why are drugs not used to treat rheumatoid arthritis a lot?
bc they have horrible long term affects such as ulcers, hemorrhages, tinnitus, hypertension, and osteosporosis
What is tennitius?
ringing in the ears
NAME
this ringing in the ears
tennitisu
What is synovectomy?
is the surgical removal of the synovial membrane surrounding the joint
NAME
this is the surgical removal of the synovial membrane surrounding the joint
synovectomy
What is arthroplasty?
is the surgical replacement, formation, or reformation of the joint
NAME
this is the surgical replacement, formation, or reformation of the joint
arthroplasty
What are some psychosocial issues of rheumatoid arthritis?(7)
(1)can affect person's ability to finish work or ability to engage in recreational and social activites (2)have to adjust to living w pain (3)experience sleep distubances which can lead to fatigue and depression (4)some people develop learned helpness from the unpredictablity of the condition (5)as condition progresses, they will become more dependedn on others, assistive devices....this may cause them to feel a loss of sense of control, and low self esteem (6)deformities may also contribute to low self-esteem (7)however, the use of devices can be make performing tasks easier--however, some people may fear to use them and see them as "giving up" or be concerned about how they would appear w the device
What are some psychosocial issues of rheumatoid arthritis?(7)
(1)can affect person's ability to finish work or ability to engage in recreational and social activites (2)have to adjust to living w pain (3)experience sleep distubances which can lead to fatigue and depression (4)some people develop learned helpness from the unpredictablity of the condition (5)as condition progresses, they will become more dependedn on others, assistive devices....this may cause them to feel a loss of sense of control, and low self esteem (6)deformities may also contribute to low self-esteem (7)however, the use of devices can be make performing tasks easier--however, some people may fear to use them and see them as "giving up" or be concerned about how they would appear w the device
What are some vocational issues associated rheumatoid arthritis/
(1)experience a number of work barriers such as physical barriers like handling, writing, and energy related barriers to psychosical barriers (3)not all individuals become totally disabled (4)pain and limited motion may affect ability to perform certain tasks (5)if lower extermety joints are affectedm they may have trouble standing for long periods of time (6)if indiviudal symptoms increase by temperature and humidity, should stick to working indoors (7)going in and out of cold and warm environments should be avoided (8)they require extra time to get read y for work (9)they need prescribed periods for rest and excerise must be cosnidere d (10)assistive devices can help them manage work and daily tasks
What are some vocational issues associated rheumatoid arthritis?(10)
(1)experience a number of work barriers such as physical barriers like handling, writing, and energy related barriers to psychosical barriers (3)not all individuals become totally disabled (4)pain and limited motion may affect ability to perform certain tasks (5)if lower extermety joints are affectedm they may have trouble standing for long periods of time (6)if indiviudal symptoms increase by temperature and humidity, should stick to working indoors (7)going in and out of cold and warm environments should be avoided (8)they require extra time to get read y for work (9)they need prescribed periods for rest and excerise must be cosnidere d (10)assistive devices can help them manage work and daily tasks
What are some vocational issues associated rheumatoid arthritis/(10)
(1)experience a number of work barriers such as physical barriers like handling, writing, and energy related barriers to psychosical barriers (3)not all individuals become totally disabled (4)pain and limited motion may affect ability to perform certain tasks (5)if lower extermety joints are affectedm they may have trouble standing for long periods of time (6)if indiviudal symptoms increase by temperature and humidity, should stick to working indoors (7)going in and out of cold and warm environments should be avoided (8)they require extra time to get read y for work (9)they need prescribed periods for rest and excerise must be cosnidere d (10)assistive devices can help them manage work and daily tasks