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22 Cards in this Set

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disegno
drafting or drawing of a work; or the idea at the root of a work.
Came to mean the planning of a
work.
Installment Payments
Singer Sewing Machines
Offer installment payments to private households.
The Steam Engine
The Steam Engine, 1765
James Watt
Powered by steam: expanding and cooling water within a cylinder drove a piston up and down.
Mass Marketing
Josiah Wedgewood
Pottery factory.
Used old energy sources: horses, moving water; not steam; 1769.
First to market to the middle class; pioneer of mass marketing; earthenware that was affordable, aesthetically pleasing, could take sudden changes in temperature; quick to produce.
Industrial Revolution
Origins of Design, 1765-1880
The Real Beginnings
Stone tools created 2 million years B.C.
Printing Press
1450
Johannes Gutenberg
1765-1880
A shift from craft labor to mass production; workshops to factories.
Mass production and interchangeable parts allowed design standardization.
Steam engine.
Mass marketing.
Fine Art vs. Design
Art is usually done for oneself.
Doesn’t have to be functional. Primarily concerned with aesthetics.
Design involves the planning of form and function for industrial items, interiors, visuals which are meant to communicate to others and to be used by others.
It is not done for oneself to express motions or satisfy ones ego.
Department of Design’s definition of
Department of Design’s definition of
design: A purposeful, systematic, and
creative activity.
Form Follows Function
Louis Sullivan
“Skyscraper”
The Pirie Scott Department Store, Chicago, 1899-1904.
Example of Modern Functionalist architecture.
First skyscrapers were built in Chicago.
Space at a premium, so they built upward instead of outward.
Corporate Identity
Designing A Company
1896 to Victorian Art Nouveau Modern to Present
Corporate Identity
Evolution of an identity.
Peter Behrens
Printed Material
AEG
Fan prospectus.
Products
AEG products.
Architecture
AEG Turbine Hall, 1909 Berlin
Paul Rand
Russia
Beyond England
Constructivism
1913–1933
Constructivism
Vladimir Tatlin, founder
El Lissitzky
Alexander Rodchenko
Vladimir Tatlin
Monument to 3rd International
1920
26
El Lissitzky Alexander Rodchenko
Constructivists
27
Propaganda
Beat the Whites with the Red Wedge
Poster, 1920
El Lissitzky
Photo montage.
Alexander Rodchenko
Alexander Rodchenko
Movie
poster.
Alexander Rodchenko
Self portrait.
1933 Silk
1932 Silk
Contructivist’s fabrics
De Stijl
1917-1931, Netherlands
De Stijl
1917-1931
Piet Mondrian, painter
Gerrit Rietveld, furniture designer
Pieter Oud, architect
Theo van Doesburg, publicist, art
critic
Gerrit Rietveld
Red & Blue Chair
1918-1923
Piet Mondrian
Composition, 1922
Pieter Oud
Café
Rotterdam, 1926
The Bauhaus
1919-1933
The Bauhaus
Walter Gropius, founder and architect
Laszlo Moholy-Nagy
Herbert Bayer
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe
Marcel Breuer
Marianne Brandt
Le Corbusier, contemporary
Walter Gropius
Bauhaus, Dessau 1925
Bauhaus Closed 1933
Refused to work for Nazis.
Many members move tothe United States.
Herbert Bayer
Herbert Bayer
Photography and
typography collage.
Herbert Bayer
Photographic and
darkroom manipulation.
Marcel Breur
Self portrait.
Marcel Breuer
Chair, 1921
Red & Blue Chair
1917-1923
Gerrit Reitveld
Marcel Breuer
Wassily Chair, 1925
Classic design, still made today by Knoll.
Named after his friend and painter Wassily Kandinsky.
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe
Mies van der Rohe
Seagram’s building.
Functionalist Modern architecture.
Steel frame sky scraper, glass windowed façade, flat roof.
Mies van der Rohe
Barcelona Chair
1929
1929 Barcelona International Exhibition
German Pavilion, 1929
Marianne Brandt
Self portrait.
Marianne Brandt
Tea service, 1924
Silver, ebony and plexiglass.
Functional Modern vs. Victorian
Marianne Brandt, 1924
Marianne Brandt
Desk Lamp
Classic design, 1928
Le Corbusier
The architect.
Grand Comfort Lounge Chair, 1929
Le Corbusier
Villa Savoye, 1929-1931
Le Corbusier
Notre Dame du Haut
Ronchamp, France, 1950
Notre Dame du Haut
World’s Fair
1939
“World of the
Future”
Based on what thevision of life would be in the 1960’s.
At the height of the
Depression.
Commercial failure, but it highlighted design.
1939 World’s Fair
Interior of General Motors
Highway & Horizonsexhibit.
The General Motors
Futurama at the 1939 New York World's Fair was one of the most elaborate dark rides in history. A chain of over three hundred seats snaked past gigantic animated tableaux of the city of the future…1960.
1939 Worlds Fair
General Motors Building
Functionalist Modernism
1950’s & 1960’s
Charles and Ray Eames
Eero Saarinen
Verner Panton
Dieter Rams
George Nelson
Charles & Ray Eames
(1907-1978) Charles
(1912-1988) Ray
Known for furniture and toy design.
Command and new uses of wood, metal and plastics.
Practiced architecture, film, interior design and product design.
Charles & Ray Eames
Model 670, Eames
Lounge Chair & Ottoman, 1956.
Made from 3 moulded rosewood shells.
Leather upholstery.
Cast aluminium base.
Wood-Moulding Technolgoy
Leg splints, Charles Eames 1942
Eero Saarinen
Finnish architect, (1910-1961)
Known for his Post-Modern style.
Architect of the Gateway Arch in St.
Louis and the Dulles Airport terminal in Virginia.
Eero Saarinen
Tulip Chair, 1956
“Good Form”
Functionalist Modernism and Neo-
Functionalism, 1950’s
Verner Panton
(1926-1998)
Danish designer and architect best known for furniture and lighting.
Also designed fabrics and interiors.
Gerrit Rietveld
Zig-Zag Chair,
1934
Verner Panton
Panton Chair (or Side Chair), 1959-60
Heart Chair
Verner Panton
Verner Panton
Cone Chair
Dieter Rams
1932-present, Wiesbaden, Germany.
Trained as an architect and interior designer in Germany.
Known for his work at Braun.
Stark and austere, yet functional.
Dieter Rams
Braun Room Fan, 1974
Braun Coffee Grinder, 1969
Marshmellow Sofa, 1956
George Nelson
(1908-1986)
One of the most influential figures in postwar American design.
Known for furniture, clocks and his research and writings of modernism.
Studied at Yale.
George Nelson
Coffee Table, 1944.
Glass top and wood base
manufactured by Herman Miller.
George Nelson
Natural woodball clock, 1948
Multicolor ball clock, 1948 Sunburst clock, 1950
Asterisk clock, white, 1950 Asterisk clock, black, 1950
Kite clock, 1960
George Nelson
Design = Good Business
Design = Good Business
Paul Rand
Herbert Matter
Josef Muller Brockmann
Lester Beall
Ivan Chermayeff
Paul Rand
(1914-1996)
Preeminent corporate designer.
Considered the father of modern graphic design.
Famous for corporate identity programs including IBM, ABC, Westinghouse, and UPS.
Paul Rand
Do you need a caption?
Swiss Travel Poster
Herbert Matter
(1907- 1984)
Swiss born American.
Pioneer in the use of photography in advertising
Photomontage and type.
Herbert Matter
Josef Muller Brockmann
(1914-1996)
Pioneer of swiss graphic design.
Josef Muller Brockmann

Lester Beall
(1903-1969)
American graphic designer.
Type and imagery in posters
Corporate identity (International Paper).
Lester Beall
Ivan Chermayeff
Russian graphic designer.
Founder of Chermayeff and Geismar design firm.
Corporate logos, exhibits and graphic design.
Ivan Chermayeff
Italian Design 1954-1968
“Good” Design With Personality
Mario Bellani
Richard Sapper
Mario Bellini
(1935-present)
Trained as an architect in Milan.
Opened his own studio in 1959.
Architecture, furnishings and industrial design.
Worked for Olivetti.
Mario Bellini
Olivetti Portable calculator, 1973
Radio “Alpha”, 1968
Mario Bellini
Lettera 12 typewriter for Olivetti, 1977
Mario Bellini
Cab Chair, 1976
Mario Bellini
Imago Executive Office Chair
Ypilson Office Chair
Tizio Lamp
Richard Sapper
(1932-present)
Italian born in Germany.
One of the most influential Italian industrial designers.
Known for his IBM
ThinkPad and Tizio Lamps.
Also worked at Mercedes-Benz.
Richard Sapper
IBM Thinkpad 2000
IBM NetVista X401 PC
Pop Culture
1960’s
Roy Lichtenstein
Andy Warhol
Ettore Sottsass
Joe Colombo
Memphis Group
Roy Lichtenstein
(1923-1997)
Known as a “Pop Artist.”
Graduate of OSU, 1949.
Taught at OSU from 1949-1951.
Roy Lichtenstein
Vicki, 42” x 42” 1964.
Roy Lichtenstein
Campbell's Soup 1, 1968
Andy Warhol
(1928-1987)
Founder of Pop
Art Movement
Trained as
graphic artist.
Marilyn, 1964
Andy Warhol
Memphis Group
Famous group of Italian designers
guided by Ettore Sottsass.
“Strange furniture with flashily
coloured plastic laminates
emblazoned with geometric and
leopard-skin patterns usually found
in 1950s comic books or cheap
cafés.”
Ettore Sottsass
(1917-present)
Founded “Memphis” design movement.
Known for furniture and product design as well as ceramics, graphics and craftwork.
Former head of design for Olivetti, the Italian computer manufacturer.
Ettore Sottsass
Carlton, 1981
Ettore Sottsass
Olivetti Valentine typewriter, 1969
Joe Colombo
Italian artist & designer (1930-1971).
Known for innovative use of plastic in furnishings and office equipment; “master of plastic design.”
Plastics
As the appeal of functionalism began to fade in favor for the new pop culture of the 60’s.
This was the time many international patents on materials were expiring, such as polyethylene which was introduced before WWII, thus making them more available and less costly. Plastics allowed the designer to challenge the user's experience with weight, color and form.
Streamlining
1927-1939
The dawn of industrial design.
Raymond Loewy
Norman Bel Geddes
Henry Dreyfuss
Walter Dorwin Teague
1939 World’s Fair
Raymond Loewy (1893- 1986)
Trained as an engineer and gaphic designer.
tarted Raymond Loewy
Associates in NYC in 1929
Flamboyant, and charismatic.
One of the founders of
Industrial Design profession.
Designed everything fromlogos, locomotives, radios toAir Force One.
Raymond Loewy
International Harvester
Raymond Loewy
Cover of Time Magazine.
Life Magazine recently selected
Loewy as one of the 100 most nfluential Americans of the twentieth
century.
Raymond Loewy
Raymond Loewy
The 1961 Studebaker Avanti
NY Central Pencil Sharpener,1933
Raymond Loewy
Raymond Loewy
Raymond Loewy
Dole Deluxe Coca-Cola dispenser, 1947
The Shell Symbol, 1967
Raymond Loewy
Norman Bel Geddes
(1893-1958)
Studied at the Cleveland
Institute Of Art.
Originally a theatrical designer ntil meeting Frank Lloyd Wight.
Known for “streamlining”.
A visionary.
Norman Bel Geddes
Norman Bel Geddes
“Patriot” Radio, 1940
Norman Bel Geddes
In 1929 he proposed the Airliner Number 4 as the transatlantic airliner of 1940.
Norman Bel Geddes
Bel Geddes designed the GM Futurama Building.
1939 Worlds Fair, New York City.
Norman Bel Geddes
Entrace ramp to General Motors
World’s Fair Futurama exhibit.
Norman Bel Geddes
Control bridge: future motorway style.
Henry Dreyfuss
(1904-1972)
Helped develop the industrial design profession in the 1930’s.
Established Henry Dreyfuss
Associates (still in business today).
Pioneer in human factors engineering.
Henry Dreyfuss
Prototype round thermostat.
1941
Henry Dreyfuss
Designing for People: autobiography
by Henry Dreyfuss, drawings by Alvin
Tilley, 1955
Human Factors
Designed “Joe” and “Josephine”
Henry Dreyfuss
Poloraid’s Land Camera, 1964.
Designed to be cheaper than its predecessor.
Neat and portable.
Controls are marked to aid easy use.
Envisaged solutions others could
not.
Henry Dreyfuss
“Mercury” locomotive, 1941
Totally unified product, even down to the coffee cups in the buffet.
Ran between Chicago and Detroit.
Innovative informal
clustering of seats, intended to provide more relaxed traveling experience.

Poster of Mercury Locomotive
Henry Dreyfuss
Ergonomics & human factors.
Solution to a design problem had to address all social, ethical, aesthetic and practical requirements.
Spread his views on the subject through his writings and consultations.
Walter Dorwin Teague
(1883-1960)
Worked in advertising until opening own studio in 1912 (still in business today).
Best known for Kodak cameras (first client) and Boeing airplane interiors.
Also home interiors.
Walter Dorwin Teague
Boeing Stratocruiser interior.
Walter Dorwin Teague
The Modern Room
Ford House, Michigan, 1938.
Designed in 1938 for Edsel and Eleanor Ford in Grosse Pointe Shores, Michigan.
Combined use of metal, wood and leather.
Unified approach to interior design.
Walter Dorwin Teague
Bluebird radio, 1934
Walter Dorwin Teague
Camera and Box, 1930
For Eastman Kodak Company
Metal, lacquer.
Art Deco
1918-1939
A.M. Cassandre
New York and Paris
Hollywood
Chrysler Building, Empire State,Rockefeller Center, Radio City MusicHall3
Art Deco Characteristics
Vertical emphasis and flat roofs.
Geometric ornament: parallel straightlines, zig-zags, chevrons, lozenges.
Stylized floral motifs and figure sculptures.
Octagonal lamps, clocks.
Sunrise and floral patterns in ornamentation.
Buildings are “stripped down” to their purest forms.
Art Deco Influences
Especially in Europe, various avant-garde painting styles of the early twentieth century: Cubism, Russian
Constructivism and Italian Futurism.
Reaction to the sensuousness and flowing lines of Art Nouveau.
Ancient Egypt (Pharaoh
Tutankhamen's tomb was discovered in 1922).
Pre-Columbian art and architecture of the Americas.
The Chariot of Aurora
Art Deco wall relief in the Scaife gallery at Carnegie Mellon
Designed for the Grand Salon of the
French ocean liner Normandie, 1935.
New York
Gargoyles
Chrysler
Showroom
Lobby Entrance
Chrysler Building
Elevator
Lobby
Empire State Building
Built in 1930.
Original Owner, John Jacob Raskob.
Founder of GM.
Rockefeller Center
Radio City Music Hall
A.M. Cassandre
Ukrainian born (1901).
Lived in France (Died in 1968).
Known for strong emblematic posters which were all over Parisfor two decades.
Travel & product posters.
A.M. Cassandre
Nord Express
A.M. Cassandre
A.M. Cassandre
Normandie transatlantic
ocean liner poster, 1935.
A.M. Cassandre
The Bauhaus
1919-1933
Walter Gropius, founder and architect
Laszlo Moholy-Nagy
Herbert Bayer
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe
Marcel Breuer
Marianne Brandt
Le Corbusier, contemporary
Walter Gropius
Bauhaus, Dessau 1925
Bauhaus Closed 1933
Refused to work for Nazis.
Many members move tothe United States.
Herbert Bayer
Herbert Bayer
Photography and
typography collage.
Herbert Bayer
Photographic and
darkroom manipulation.
Marcel Breur
Self portrait.
Marcel Breuer
Chair, 1921
Red & Blue Chair
1917-1923
Gerrit Reitveld
Marcel Breuer
Wassily Chair, 1925
Classic design, still made today by Knoll.
Named after his friend and painter Wassily Kandinsky.
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe
Mies van der Rohe
Seagram’s building.
Functionalist Modern architecture.
Steel frame sky scraper, glass windowed façade, flat roof.
Mies van der Rohe
Barcelona Chair
1929
1929 Barcelona International Exhibition
German Pavilion, 1929
Marianne Brandt
Self portrait.
Marianne Brandt
Tea service, 1924
Silver, ebony and plexiglass.
Functional Modern vs. Victorian
Marianne Brandt, 1924
Marianne Brandt
Desk Lamp
Classic design, 1928
Le Corbusier
The architect.
Grand Comfort Lounge Chair, 1929
Le Corbusier
Villa Savoye, 1929-1931
Le Corbusier
Notre Dame du Haut
Ronchamp, France, 1950
Notre Dame du Haut
Curvilinear vs.
Rectilinear
Stained glass.
Curvilinear vs.
Rectilinear.
Post-Modernism
Design Leading Up To Today
From Modern to Post-Modern
An awareness of the emotional insufficiency of functionalism grew.
An opposition to modernism that questioned the prevailing standards.
First manifested itself in architecture.
Rebelled with its use of historical citations, individuality, colorfulness against the “colorless rational forms of a dogmatic modernism.”
Post-Modernism
Philip Johnson
Michael Graves
Philippe Starck
Robert Propst
Donald Deskey
Gaetano Pesce
Philip Johnson
Born Cleveland in 1906.
A.B. Architectural History, Harvard.
Director, Department of Architecture,
Museum of Modern Art.
Brought a lot of attention to Modern & Post-Modern Architecture.
1940 studied under Marcel Breuer at
Harvard.
Philip Johnson
Glass House, New Canaan, CT,
1949.
Philip Johnson
AT&T Building, New York, 1979-84
Philip Johnson
Crystal Cathedral, Garden
Grove, CA.
Dedicated 1980.
Philip Johnson
Mathmatics Tower/Science and Engineering Library,
Columbus, OH.
1992
Michael Graves
(1934-present)
Degrees from University of Cincinnati, Harvard.
Professor of Architecture at Princeton University.
Started Michael Graves Design.
Known for Post-Modern architecture, interiors and product design.
Target carries a line of products designed by his firm.
Michael Graves
Teapot for Alessi
Toaster for Target
Philippe Starck
Philippe Starck
(1949-present)
French designer, architect trained as an interior designer started own company to make inflatable objects in 1968.
Whimsical, tongue-in-cheek design.
Designs products from cutlery to boats.
http://www.philippe-starck.com
Philippe Starck
Café Costes, Paris 1984
Robert Propst
Designer, inventor.
Invented Herman Miller’s Hugely popular “Action Office” furniture series in 1968
Robert Propst
Panel system defines the work space, houses electrical and data wires.
Influences the aesthetic character of the environment.
Robert Propst
Action Office
Donald Deskey
(1894-1989)
Former art director turned industrial designer.
Best known for his interior design ofthe the Rockefeller Center’s Radio City music hall.
Interior, industrial, and visual communication design.
Started Deskey Associates in the
1940’s.
Donald Deskey
Gaetano Pesce
(1939-present)
Italian architect and designer.
Lives and works in New York since
1980.
Incorporates popular culture into design.
Gaetano Pesce
Feltri chair, 1986
Up Family, 1969
Gaetano Pesce
Up 5-6 or La Mama, 1969
New Wave
The Information Age
New Wave & Information Age
April Greiman
Richard Saul Wurman
Eric Spiekermann
Clemont Mok
http://www.studioarchetype.com
David Carson
April Greiman
(1948-present)
Known for her work using new techniques in layering graphics upon each other.
Currently working at Pentagram in California.
April Greiman
http://www.aprilgreiman.com/
AR_artifactsPO_f02.html
Richard Saul Wurman
(1935-present)
Known as the “information architect” for his work on utilizing graphic design to present information in new ways.
Wrote “Information Anxiety”
Post-Modernism
Eric Spiekermann
Meta Design founded, 1982 in Berlin.
Germany’s largest design firm.
Meta typeface.
David Carson
Nine Inch Nails
The Fragile
Bank Of Montreal
Television commercial
LEAP Batteries of Canada
Television commercial
David Carson
“End of Print”
“2nd Sight”
Design For The Real World
Design For The Real World
Niels Diffrent
Bill Stumpf
Deane Richardson
Hartmut Esslinger, Frog Design
Niels Diffirent
Architect and designer.
Designed chairs with Eero Saarinen.
Designed everything from chairs to tractors at Henry Dreyfuss Associates from 1956-1981.
Independent seating designer since
1981.
Niels Diffirent
Task Light
Freedom Saddle Seat
Niels Diffirent
Freedom chair
Niels Diffirent
“When design springs from an understanding of the people who are going to use a product, you begin to see forms that you would never have imagined.”
Bill Stumpf
(1936-present)
Preeminent designer of seating and furniture.
Designed ground breaking Ergon and Aeron Chairs for Herman Miller.
Bill Stumpf
Aeron Chair
Bill Stumpf
Ergon Chair
Deane Richardson
Founder of Richardson Smith
Became Fitch, Inc.
Crown Equipment was one of their first clients.
Richardson Smith was was one of the preeminent design firms in the
1980’s.
Hartmut Esslinger
Founded frog design in 1969 in
Germany.
Designer of the original Apple IIc and
Macintosh computer and the Sony
Walkman.
Coined the term “Form follows emotion.”
Hansgrohe Triblel Shower & Faucets
frog design
Freestyle, 1998
Clipfone, 1998