• Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/36

Click to flip

36 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
each tooth must be attached by each of the following to remain in the oral cavity?
periodontal ligament
fibers of the gingiva
alveolar bone
junctional epithelium
attaches gingiva to tooth
junctional epithelium
network of fibers that surround the root of tooth. these attach to bone on one side and cementum of root on the other
fibers of the gingiva
surrounds root of teeth, supports and protects the root
alveolar bone
pd can cause?
loss of tissue attachment
destruction of alveolar bone
leading cause of tooth loss in adults?
PERIO DISEASE
systemic conditions: links to periodontal disease
preterm low birthweight
cardiovascular disease
respiratory disease
cause of PD?
plaque aka biofilm
calculus is called what in older patients?
tartar`
contributing factors to PD
smoking
osteoporosis
hiv/aids
diabetes
meds (dilantin)
poor OH
stress
signs of PD (6)
red
swollen
tender
bleeding
loose teeth
pain or pressure when chewing
pus around teeth/gingiva
sulcus that has been deepened by disease?
periodontal pocket
tightly connected to cementum on root, CT that covers alveolar bone
attached gingiva
distance from gingival margin to base of sulcus or periodontal pocket
probing depth
tip touches the tooth near the cej , tissue will blanche and appear white
healthy probing depth situation
probe tip touches root somewhere below the cej bleeding usually occurs
unhealthy probe situation
healthy mouth, most of tooth root is surrounded by bone, crest of bone is located close to crowns, only 1-2 mm apical to CEJ of tooth
health case type I
inflammation of gingiva characterized by:
changes in color, gingival position, surface appearance, bleeding, exudate
NO LOSS OF BONE, CREST OF ALVEOLAR BONE IS ONLY 1-2 MM FROM cej
case type 1: gingival disease gingivitis
progression of gingival inflammation into deeper perio structures and alveolar bone crest, SLIGHT bone loss, SLIGHT loss of CT attachment to alveolar bone, inflammation is from free gingiva to attached gingiva
case type II: early periodontitis
advanced stage, increased destruction of Perio structures and NOTICEABLE loss of bone support, maybe tooth mobility, inflammation from attached gingiva to mucogingival junction
Case type III: moderate Periodontitis
fruther progression of periodontitis, MAJOR loss of alveolar bone, increased tooth mobility, furcation involvement
case type IV: advanced periodontitis
those with multiple disease sites that continue to demonstrate attachment loss after therapy, sites continue to be infected by perio pathogens no matter the treatment, includes those with recurrent disease at single or multiple sites
case type V: refractory periodontitis
pocket formed by gingival enlargement WITHOUT apical migration of Junctional epithelium, these are always suprabony
gingival pocket
gingival pockets are always infra or supra bony?
supra!
base of pocket is coronal to alveolar bone crest
suprabony pocket
pcoket formed from disease of gingival sulcus where junctional epithelium migrates apically
periodontal pocket
base is below alveolar bone crest
infra or intra bony
inner boundary of pocket?
tooth surface
outer boundary of pocket?
sulcular epithelium or pocket epithelium
where inner and outer walls meet at the base of the pocket? junctional epithelium
base boundary
process of inflammation: (4)
1. bacteria makes toxins
2. sulcular epithelium is invaded
3. inflammatory rxn caused by increased blood flow to area
4. may have edema( inflam), exudate, gingival pocket formed from gingival swelling, enlargement
is a gingival pocket reversible?
yes,
if a gingival pocket is continued with bad OH what happens?
bacteria will go from gram + to gram -, chronic gingivitis will develop, tissue may bleed or may not
progression of gingival inflammation depends on: (4)
iatrogenic dentistry (caused by clinician)
host defense
bacterial plaque (not all gingivitis progresses to perio)
systemic factors: meds, med conditions, dilantin,
progressive apical migration occurs due to:
pt unable to keep pocket clean, bacteria matures, more loss of attachment, disease continues
role of calculus and PD: (3)
provides home for plaque
provides a surface that can store toxic irritants
plaque covers calculus