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Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

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136 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Active learner
talk and listen, write, read and reflect on what they are learning
strategic learner
students who view studying and learning as a systematic process that is, to a good degree, under their control.
Self- regulated learners
They manage their time well, monitor their learning, evaluate the results of their effort, and approach learning in a systematic way. Self-regulated
Independent learners
they take the initiative for their own learning.
Metacognition
the ability to think about and control ones learning
performance awareness
must learn to determine whether they have mastered the material that they previousely identified as important, and how well its been learned
monitoring
involves keeping tabs on or checking on your progress as you complete a task and after the task is completed.
Intrinsic motivation
type of motivation that comes from inside of you
Extrinsic motivation
being motivated by external factors
Mastery goals
goals that focus on learning the material or on mastering new skills
learning style
preferred way that you acquire, process, and retain information
visual learner
auditory learner
kinesthetic learner
describe...
Chapter 2

GOALS
the ends toward which we direct our effort.
Long terms goals
objectives you set for youself for the end of the year, four or five years later
short term goals
can be set for an hour from now, day , week, month.
study goals
objectives you want to achieve during a particular study session.
Academic goals
relate to your course work
personal goals
making new friends, exercising, clubs
action plan
carefully thought-out method of implementing a strategy to achieve your goal.
action tasks
specific tasks that you need to complete to achieve your original goal.
time management *
the way you regulate or schedule your time.
time log
a record of what you do each hour of the day for one week.
prospective
what you plan to do
retrospective
what you actually do
fixed commitment
things you do the same time every day or every week.
2 to 1 ratio
study two hours for every one hour in class.
study log
calendar where you write in the number of hours you spend doing assignments and studying for each of your courses.
assignment calendar
includes all of your assignments, quizzes, and exams.
running list
a list of all assignments that you need to complete over the next week or two.
"to do list"
a list of the tasks you want to complete each day.
multiple projects
two or more exams papers or projects due during the same or overlapping time frame.
procrastination
putting things off, a common behavior pattern for many students
self-downing
refers to putting yourself down- telling yourself you cant do it or you're not smart enough.
low frustration tolerance
easily frusterated; tend to give up or have trouble starting on a task when it appears to be difficult.
hostility
anger towards professor
escapist techniques
things you do to keep from doing work
information processing model
suggest that memory is complex and consists of various processes and stages
encoding
interpreting information in a meaningful way
storage
involves working on information into LTM unless you work to store it there.
retrieval
involves getting information out of LTM
immediate memory
related to the concept of consciousness
chunk
is a group of familiar stimuli stored as a single unit.
working memory
you really have to "work" on the material to make it meaningful, memorable, and easy to retrieve.
massed practice
like cramming, involves studying all the material at one time.
spaced practice
involves spacing your study time over a longer period, with breaks between practice sessions.
consolidation
information is organized and stored in LTM
over learning
involves continuing to work on material even after its learned
rehearsal strategies
involve practicing the material until it is learned
elaborative rehearsal
repetition that involves making the information meaningful.
elaboration strategies
involves expanding on the information, forming associations, or connecting new information to what you already know.
mnemonic devices
memory tricks
acrostics
phrases or sentences that are made up of words beginning with the first letters of other words.
organizational strategies
allow you to organize the information to make it easier to learn and recall.
comprehension monitoring strategies
allow you to monitor or keep tabs on your learning.
affective and motivational strategies
strategies that relate to your attitude, interest, and motivation toward learning.
content
information that you recorded in your notes.
Hearing *
passive process; it is nonselective and involuntary.
Listening *
active process that involves receiving, attending to, and assigning meaning to aural and visual stimuli.
cornell system
includes an excellent format for setting up your note page. Use an 8 1/2 by 11 inch notebook so that you have enough space to take notes, create a recall collumn, and write a summary at the end of each page.
outlining
involves indenting each level of supporting details under the preceeding heading, subheading, or detail.
meaningful phrases
condensed versions of the statements made by the intstructor that still contain the critical concepts that were presented.
Block notes
written continuously across the page, separating the details by dashes or slashes.
modified block notes
simply indent about 1/2 inch and list all related details straight down the page under each heading.
heading
the main topics of discussion that are presented during a lecture.
recall questions
questions you write that can be answered by the important information in your notes.
concentration
focusing your attention on what your doing
light concentration
this stage of concentration your just getting settled into your reading, listening, or studying. You dont accomplish much during this stage.
moderate concentration
at this point you begain to pay attention to the material that your reading, hearing, or studying.
deep concentration
totally engrossed in your work, you arent thinking about anything except what you are hearing, writing, or reading.
focussing at will
being able to turn your attention to the task of listening to a lecture at the moment the instructor begins to speak.
sustaining your focus
keep concentration throughout the activity.
limiting your focus
one task at time. Set aside all other assignments.
distraction
anything that diverts your focus from the task at hand.
external distractions
include things like noise, an uncomfortable study area, and of course, other people.
internal distraction
things that you think about or worry about.
multitasking
often used to describe the performance of multiple tasks at one time by people.
comprehension monitoring
refers to our own evaluation of whether or not you comprehend what you read.
comprehension
understanding what you read
analysis
learning to break the information into its component parts.
evaluation
judging the value of the information in the text.
synthesis
pulling information together from individual statements made in the paragraph into more general ideas or concepts
application
involves connecting what you read to your own prior knowledge so that you can use it in a new or different way.
P2E
reading/study system that is designed for textbooks that are from easy to average level in difficulty. three steps are preview, read actively, and REVIEW
preview
brief overview of a chapter done before reading
read actively
do something active while you read.
review
do something to rehearse and reinforce the important information.
SQ3R
survey, question, read, recite, and review
(chapter 8)

marginal notes
summary statements in the margin of the text.
implied main idea
unstated main idea
linking
connecting key words together
signal words
transitions that indicate that the author has shifted direction from positive to negative points or vice versa. Leaving them out can result in misinterpretations during later review.
Headings
let you know what a section text is about
subheadings
smaller headings that divide the information in a headed section into smaller chunks.
annotate
add comments or summary notes
marginal notes
help you focus your reading can serve as recall cues for your highlighting, but they dont restructure the information.
formal outline
taking notes using the authors organization.
modified block notes
listing all important details directly under eachother.
summary
condensed version of the information, generally written in sentence or paragraph form.
Maps
visual displays of text information
hierarchical maps
provide a top down display of information
formal outline
taking notes using the authors organization.
formal outline
taking notes using the authors organization.
modified block notes
listing all important details directly under eachother.
modified block notes
listing all important details directly under eachother.
summary
condensed version of the information, generally written in sentence or paragraph form.
Maps
visual displays of text information
summary
condensed version of the information, generally written in sentence or paragraph form.
hierarchical maps
provide a top down display of information
Maps
visual displays of text information
hierarchical maps
provide a top down display of information
five day study plan
provides you with a mechnism to space your learning over a preriod of days, divide the material so that you can work on it in small chunks, use active learning strategies to study the material, and use self-testing strategies to monitor your learning.
spaced study
refers to working on the same material over a period of days.
preparation strategies
help you gather information and put it into a format that is easier to learn and remember.
integrated learning
learning information in a connected way.
Review strategies
mainly recitation strategies that help you practice the information and self-test to monitor the progress of your learning.
recall learning
allows you to recall the information without any additional cues.
study sheet
one page compilation of all the important information on a particular topic.
self test
another active way to prepare for an exam.
distractors
incorrect answers
Test anxiety
involves both physical responses, such as headache.
facilitating test anxiety
anxiety that facilitates or helps motivate you to prepare before and work hard during the exam.
debilitating test anxiety
high level of test anxiety can interfere with your performing
preperation strategies
help you gather information and put it into a format that is easier to learn and remember.
integrated learning
learning information in a way.
review strategies
mainly recitation strategies that help you practice the information and self-test to monitor the progress of your learning.
self test
active way to prepare for an exam.
pacing
dividing up the test and setting questions to answer
strategic guessing
involves more active processes
stem, alternatives, problem solving strategies
all do with multiple choice test
absolute words
words like always all none never only every and no...(for true/false) usually means that it is false while using these words.
informal outline
style in which main points are listed and then indented is the secondary or supporting points.
mnemonic device
a memory cue to improve your call.
topic sentence
states the central idea starting your first main point, back it up with one or more supporting sentences.
transition words
used to introduce the main points in your essay.
content
the information that you include in your answer. most important.
mechanics
sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and spelling.