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29 Cards in this Set

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Daniel Boorstin
wrote "The discoverers." it was a secondary source.
James McClellan
Along with Harold Dorn they wrote "science and technology in world history." it was written for college students, not scholors. widely accepted.
Harold Dorn
Along with James McClellan they wrote "science and technology in world history." it was written for college students, not scholors. widely accepted.
Aristotle
a Greek philosopher who made important contributions by systemizing deductive logic and wrote on physical subjects. His philosophy had a long-lasting influence on the development of all Western philosophical theories. Aristotle's thought is consistently teleological: everything is always changing and moving, and has some aim, goal, or purpose (telos ).
G.E.R. Lloyd
Leading historian of ancient greek science. addresses methodological issues in studying ancient science
M.I. Finley
author or editor of
over 20 books
actors category
people in the past we study. ex: doctor, medicine...
observers catagory
us (or earlier historians)
primary source
provide firsthand evidence of historical events.
secondary source
are accounts of the past created by people who are not first-hand witnesses of the event. ex: dictionaries, encyclopedias, books and articles.
paleolithic
the cultural period of the Stone Age beginning with the earliest chipped stone tools, about 750,000 years ago, until the beginning of the Mesolithic Period, about 15,000 years ago.
neolithic
the cultural period of the Stone Age beginning around 10,000 B.C. in the Middle East and later elsewhere, characterized by the development of agriculture and the making of polished stone implements.
bronze age
A period of human culture between the Stone Age and the Iron Age, characterized by the use of weapons and implements made of bronze.
iron age
The period in cultural development succeeding the Bronze Age in Asia, Europe, and Africa, characterized by the introduction of iron metallurgy. In Europe it began around the eighth century B.C.
carrying capacity
The maximum number of individuals that a given environment can support without detrimental effects.
civilization
The type of culture and society developed by a particular nation or region or in a particular epoch
pristine civilization
Remaining in a pure state
environmental circumscription
An explanation for the origins of the state that emphasizes the fundamental role exerted by environmental constraints and by territorial limitations.
technology
The scientific method and material used to achieve a commercial or industrial objective.
soul
the form, or essence of any living thing; that it is not a distinct substance from the body that it is in; that it is the possession of soul (of a specific kind) that makes an organism an organism at all, and thus that the notion of a body without a soul, or of a soul in the wrong kind of body, is simply unintelligible.
element
one of those simple bodies into which other bodies can be decomposed and which itself is not capable of being divided into others
substance
substance has sometimes come to be equated with what Aristotle called `matter'; thus iron and sulphur, and other stuffs, have come to be called `substances'
homocentric spheres
spheres that have the same center as one another
epicycle
a small circle, the center of which moves on the circumference of a larger circle at whose center is the earth and the circumference of which describes the orbit of one of the planets around the earth.
soul
the form, or essence of any living thing; that it is not a distinct substance from the body that it is in; that it is the possession of soul (of a specific kind) that makes an organism an organism at all, and thus that the notion of a body without a soul, or of a soul in the wrong kind of body, is simply unintelligible.
element
one of those simple bodies into which other bodies can be decomposed and which itself is not capable of being divided into others
substance
substance has sometimes come to be equated with what Aristotle called `matter'; thus iron and sulphur, and other stuffs, have come to be called `substances'
homocentric spheres
spheres that have the same center as one another
epicycle
a small circle, the center of which moves on the circumference of a larger circle at whose center is the earth and the circumference of which describes the orbit of one of the planets around the earth.