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105 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
AIVR
accelerated idioventricular rhythm
AV
atrioventricular
AV block
atrioventricular block
AV node
atrioventricular (or junctional) node
AV nodal rhythm
atrioventricular (or junctional) rhythm
BBB
bundle branch block
CCU
coronary care unit
c/w
consistent with
cw
clockwise
ccw
counterclockwise
CNS
central nervous system
COPD
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
CSM
carotid sinus massage (=CSP)
CSP
carotid sinus pressure (=CSM)
CVA
cerebral vascular accident
ECG
electrocardiogram
ED
emergency department
EKG
electrocardiogram (from German elektrokardiograph)
EMD
electromechanical dissociation - patient is pulseless, but ECG rhythm is seen on monitor
ETT
exercise tolerance (stress) test
ILBBB
incomplete left bundle branch block
IRBBB
incomplete right bundle branch block
IVCD
intraventricular conduction delay
IVS
interventricular septum
J point
junctional point (point marking the junction between the end of the QRS complex and the beginning of the ST segment)
LA
left atrium
LAA
left atrial abnormality
LA electrode
left arm recording electrode
LAD
left axis deviation
LAD artery
left anterior descending artery
LAE
left atrial enlargement
LAFB
left anterior fascicular block (=LAHB)
LAH
left anterior hemidivision (of the LBB)
LAHB
left anterior hemiblock
LAI
left atrial involvement (=LAA)
LBB
left bundle branch block
LCA
left coronary artery
LGL syndrome
Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome
LL electrode
left leg electrode
LPFB
left posterior fascicular block (=LPHB)
LPH
left posterior hemidivision (of the LBB)
LPHB
left posterior hemiblock
LV
left ventricle
LVE
left ventricular enlargement (=LVH)
LVH
left ventricular hypertrophy
MAT
multifocal atrial tachycardia (=chaotic atrial mechanism)
NPT
no prior tracing (is available for comparison)
NSR
normal sinus rhythm
NS ST-T ABNS
non-specific ST-T wave abnormalities
PAC
premature atrial contraction
PAT
paroxysmal atrial tachycardia
PEA
pulseless electrical activity - patient is pulseless (no contractions), but ECG rhythm is seen on monitor
PJC
premature junctional contraction
PJT
aproxysmal junctional tachycardia
PR interval
period from onset of P wave until onset of the QRS complex
PSVT
paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia
PVC
premature ventricular contraction
QRS complex
time period required to accomplish ventricular depolarization
QT interval
period from onset of Q wave until end of T wave
QTc
the QT interval corrected for heart rate
RA
right atrium
RA electrode
right arm recording electrode
RAA
right atrial abnormality
RAD
right axis deviation
RAE
right atrial enlargement
RAI
right atrial involvement (=RAA)
RBB
right bundle branch
RBBB
right bundle branch block
RCA
right coronary artery
RV
right ventricle
RVE
right ventricular enlargement (=RVH)
RVH
right ventricular hypertrophy
SA block
sinoatrial block
SA node
sinoatrial node
SSS
sick sinus syndrome
SVT
supraventricular tachycardia
Ta wave
atrial T wave (wave of atrial repolarization)
V Fib
ventricular fibrillation
VT
ventricular tachycardia
wnl
within normal limits
WCT
wide-complex tachycardia
WPW syndrome
Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome
AVNRT
AV nodal reentry tachycardia (=PSVT)
What electrical event does the P wave represent?
atrial depolarization
What electrical event does the QRS complex represent?
ventricular depolarization
What electrical event does the T wave represent?
ventricular repolarization
What electrical event does the U wave represent?
the terminal phase of ventricular repolarization (seen sometimes after the T wave)
What is the mechanical counterpart of (and follows)the P wave?
atrial contraction
What is the mechanical counterpart of (and follows)the QRS complex?
ventricular contraction
What waveform marks the beginning of mechanical systole (ventricular contraction)?
QRS complex
What waveform marks the ending of mechanical systole?
T wave
When does diastole (ventricular filling) begin and end (on ECG)?
It begins after T wave and ends after the P wave (atrial contraction)
What is a cardioverter?
an energy-storage capacitor-discharge type of condenser which is discharged with an inductance; it delivers a direct-current shock which restores normal rhythm of the heart
Can PEA (pulseless electrical activity) occur in a patient after successful cardioversion out of atrial fibrillation?
Yes. Effective atrial contraction may not resume for several weeks.
What are the 3 key intervals in the cardiac cycle
1. PR interval
2. QRS complex
3. QT interval
What comprises the PR interval?
Onset of atrial depolarization (beginning of P wave) until onset of ventricular depolarization (beginning of QRS complex)
What is the purpose of the delay in conduction at the AV node?
Allow time for the atria to contract and empty blood into the ventricles
atrial kick
atrial contraction (emptying contents into ventricles)
Why PR interval short in patients with WPW (Wolff-Parkinson-White) syndrome?
Patients have an accessory pathway (AP) that bypasses the "slow" AV node
What comprises the QRS interval?
The time it takes for ventricular depolarization
Why is the QRS complex narrow in normal sinus rhythm?
Because of the rapid conduction of the electrical impulse thru the specialized fibers of the ventricular conduction system
What happens to the QRS complex when a patient has ventricular hypertrophy?
QRS complex widens because it takes the impulse longer to get thru thickened myocardium
What happens to the QRS complex when a patient has PVC's?
QRS complex widens because the impulse originates in the ventricles.
What happens to the QRS complex when a patient has a conduction defect, e.g., bundle branch block, intraventricular conduction delay, or aberrant conduction)
The QRS complex widens because impulse is slowed down.
Absolute refractory period
period when the heart is completely refractory to premature stimuli, i.e., heart cells cannot respond until repolarization is complete