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239 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Definition of ethics:
The study of moral standards
• Ethics is the branch of philosophy that deals with ___________.
Morality
• Ethics is concerned with which things?
Distinguishing between:
• good and evil
• right and wrong actions
• virtuous/non-virtuous characteristics
• Definition of VALUES:
1) That which one acts to gain or keep – our working definition
2) Any object or quality desirable as a means or as an end in itself
• Values are determined by your:
• Moral code – which often vary from person to person

• Who has a moral code?
• Everyone 

• Are we born with an automatic set of values?
• No – taught them

• If no alternatives exist, _______________________.
• No values are possible.

• Definition of VIRTUE:
The act by which one gains and keeps values - working definition
Moral excellence and righteousness; goodness
An example or kind of moral excellence: the virtue of patience
• Moral Relativism:
My right and wrong, vs. Your right and wrong 
Compromise = no one is happy / no one gets their way
Post modern cultural ideal
• What is the only reason that some people can function in a state of moral relativism, according to Browning?
• Because most of society does not

• The Cultural Chameleon:
Influenced by their surroundings (environment / people) rather than being the influence on their surroundings
• ex: changing the atmosphere in your office – be authentic!
• Good and Evil:
• Does it really exist? – Some people reject it
Cultural “norms” exist
How do I contribute to the good?

• Tolerance vs. Acceptance:
• We’re expected to be tolerant, but tolerance is not the same as acceptance of the act

• Situational Ethics
• Ethical decisions made in light of situation at hand
• Is often misapplied as:
• Moral relativism

• In order for Situational Ethics to work, what must be done?
Must adopt a moral code that acknowledges a “higher good” or at least a tiered value system
• Ex: Value human lives more than animal lives (swerve to not hit animal in road and get badly injured in accident)
• Fundamental assumptions when a law is legislated:
• It’s for the good, etc. 

• Problem with law:
Does “legal” = “right”?
• Does “illegal” = “wrong”?
• Who decides what the laws are and what they’re based upon?
• VALUES, common ground/beliefs, greater good [hopefully]
But… What about slavery? 
Who’s responsibility is it…? People just leave it up to others
• According to Ayn Rand, “In order for nature to be commanded, it __________________”
• Must be obeyed 
In order to lead or command it, you have to understand it!

• Contradictions in Ethics:
Some choose self-destructive lives / self-destructive moral codes
• Many live their lives without ever addressing their contradictions

• Contradictory values ____________________
• Confused ethics 
But what are the consequences…?

• Most of the contradictions in our lives = __________ in our lives
Destruction
Responsibility:
• Involves what?
• Implication of _____________________
Knowing
• Adopting “questionable” moral codes: (From Nuremberg Trials)
• “I was merely following orders…”
• “I was only obeying the law…”
• “I’m just doing what I was told…”
• “I didn’t know that was plagerism…”
• “Everyone else is doing it…”


• The assumption that someone or something knows more than I can know implies what?
• That I’m not responsible 
Ex: McD’s coffee trial 

• When Production exceeds Consumption (Producing > Consuming), a _______ effect is seen.
Positive
• When Consumption exceeds Production (Consuming > Producing), a _____ effect is seen.
Negative
• Giving services away creates what in our patients?
• Negative effect / attitude 

• The idea/practice that you must do everything you can to provide care to everyone:
• Selfless Server Ethics 
Things like changing fees for each patient so they can afford it, etc.

• What is the contradiction of Selfless-Server Ethics?
• You can’t be “selfless” and make a profit 
motivation for personal gain is in direct conflict with the ideal.

• The “Martyr Complex” / “Selfless Server” ethics is a ________________________ behavior.
• Self-destructive 
If you’re not around to serve anybody (bc you went broke), what’s the point…?

• An alternative to the “Selfless Server” is the __________ principle.
• Fair Exchange 

• Fair Exchange Principle entails what?
• Fair exchange of goods/services via barter, money, etc. 
Trading chiropractic care with a patient in exchange for their car repair services, etc.

• According to the Fair Exchange Principle, the “guilt of acquiring wealth/success” is an affliction that is ______________.
• Easily remedied 

Epistemology
• How we know what we know
• The nature and origin of knowledge
Epistemology
Epistemology Asks what question?
• “How do we know what we know?”

• According to Aristotle, how do we know if “existence” exists?
• Because if something “exists” then we can perceive it with our senses
• We have consciousness to perceive it 

• Man’s ability to ______ separates us from lower life forms.
reason
• The formal, guiding principle of a discipline, school, or science:
Logic
• Logic:
• The study of the principles of reasoning / System or mode of reasoning
• Art of non-contradictory identification (applies the Law of Identity – Black is Black)
• Primary goal of Logic:
• To integrate perceptions into concepts without contradiction
All concepts must fit into the total sum of knowledge 
We often develop concepts from our perceptions of the world (not facts)
• 2 Formats: of logic
• Modus Ponens
• Modus Tollens

• Modus Ponens:
• Affirming the antecedent
• If the theory (X) is true, then the prediction (Y) is true.
The theory (X) is true.
Therefore the prediction (Y) is true.

• Modus Ponens:
• Modus Tollens:
• Denying the consequent – falsifying it
• Modus Tollens:
• “Popper’s Chopper”
• If the theory (X) is true, then the prediction (Y) is true.
The prediction (Y) is false.
Therefore, the theory (X) is false. 

• Modus Ponens:
• Most of clinical science and evidence based medicine is “camped” at which premise?
• Modus Tollens

• According to Sinnott, our conclusions are based upon what?
• Methods of reasoning used

• “_________________________________ will dictate why you do what you do.”
• Why you believe what you believe

• The process of reasoning in which a conclusion follows (necessarily) from the stated premise.
• Deductive reasoning

• Deductive Reasoning:
• Reasoning from the general to the specific
Starts with a premise and draws conclusions based absolutely on the premise
• So if the premises are true, then the conclusion will also be true
Impossible to have a false conclusion deduced from a true premise
• Conclusion is just a reorganization of what was already stated in the premise; does not provide any additional information

• Deductive Reasoning:
• Benefits of Deductive Reasoning:
• Always yields a true conclusion if the premise is true
• Facts DO result from proper deduction

• Problems with Deductive Reasoning:
• Most of our reasoning in is not through the use of syllogisms – Contains ambiguities
• Offers no new information in the conclusions – Conclusion already contained in premise
• Terminology must be well-defined
• If your premise is flawed, your reasoning may be flawed as well

• The nature of _______ knowledge is deductive.
Formal
• What is the problem with this premise: “All lawyers are crooks.”?
• Not all lawyers are the same
• Contradicts the premise that “Every person is different”

• Combining 2 or more premises to draw conclusions from them =
• Syllogism 

• 3 basic categories of Syllogism:
• Categorical Syllogism
• Conditional Syllogism
• Alternative Syllogism
• What determines the categorical group of a Syllogism?
• The way that the premise is stated (based on vocabulary)

• Categorical Syllogism:
• 2 Subcategories:
• Universal Categorical
• Partial Categorical
Universal Categorical Syllogism:
• Key words:
• ALL, EVERY, NO, NONE, ALWAYS, or NEVER
• Universal Categorical Syllogism: format
• Groupings are made and compared to each other
Non-exclusive Alternative Syllogism: • Key words:
BOTH
• A principle of reasoning to a conclusion about all of the members of a class from examining only a few members of the class, is what?
• Inductive Reasoning

• Inductive Reasoning:
• Reasoning from the PARTICULAR to the GENERAL
• Nothing more than probabilities…
Inductive Reasoning:format/ reason
• In 2009, Tony Romo choked in the playoffs. [Premise 1]
Quarterbacks that choke in playoffs cry like little girls & make excuses [Prem. 2]
In 2009, Tony Romo cried like a little girl and made excuses for choking in the playoffs. [Conclusion]

• Problems with Inductive Reasoning:
• Impossible to present conclusion as facts
• Does not allow for new information to be considered
• If the presenter strays from the confines of their accumulated experience, validity of the argument is lost
• Cannot lead to fact or proof of anything, only probability
• Informal (Inductive) Reasoning is what?
• Making a claim without using proper Inductive Reasoning
• Ex: “If DCs are allowed to prescribe drugs, the profession will be lost.”

• Problems with Informal Reasoning:
• The claim can not be defined by the terms used
The terms have a broad scope of meaning
• Multiple levels of meaning may lead to confusion and disagreement
Words lose their meaning
• Produces conclusions that are NOT contained within the initial premise 

• Formal / Deductive reasoning will always arrive at truth if __________.
• The original premise is correct

• Informal reasoning is based on what?
• Likely outcomes

• Process of making all things equal between 2 subjects except for one variable, and then observing for changes / inequalities is what?
• Scientific Method

Scientific Method:
• Developed by:
• John Stuart Mill (1806-1873)
• Scientific Method:
• Empirical Method

• Problems with the Scientific Method:
• Not reliable with living systems
Living systems are dynamic and there are multiple variables constantly in play
• Impossible to remove all variables except one between any two people
• Physiological adaptations / capacity for adaptations can’t be quantified to a degree that offers reliable data
• Correlation may be confused with Causal relationship
• Mistaken “cause” could be just a secondary effect – just because event B occurs after event A doesn’t mean A caused B
• Based on INFORMAL reasoning – it can be WRONG

• Two Scientific Paradigms (and who developed them):
• Normal Science
• Revolutionary Science
• Kuhn
• Normal Science: • Involves what?
• Stating a hypothesis and then testing its nature through observation
• Normal Science: • Establishes probability how?
• Through observation 

• Problems with Normal Science:
• Disease becomes a business
• Sometimes considered “untouchable,” even when it is flawed – begins to stagnate when it is chained to a flawed premise
At what point do we overthrow a flawed paradigm so that new theories can be considered?

• In Normal Science, when scientists are unable to define a certain variable they deem it:
• An ANOMALY 

• In Normal Science, effects caused outside the anticipated results are referred to as:
• Side effects (which are Anomalies) 

Revolutionary Science:
• Involves what?
• A shift in paradigms which opens up the possibility for massive change
• Revolutionary Science: • Caused by:
• Flawed premises in previous scientific theories
• Revolutionary Science:
• Developed how?
• By exposing the contradictory makeup of the defeated paradigms
• Revolutionary Science: • Examples:
• Examples:
• In Revolutionary Science, new theories often explain ____ found within older theories.
• Anomalies 

• Who developed the 4 Epistemologies of Chiropractic?
• Dr. Joe Keating
• What was the title of Keating’s book?
• “Toward a Philosophy of the Science of Chiropractic”

• 4 Epistemologies of Chiropractic:
• A fixed or founding dogma
• Rationalism
• Private or uncritical empiricism
• Clinical science 

• 1st Epistemology of Chiropractic:
• “A fixed or founding dogma”
• 1st Epistemology of Chiropractic: • Based on what?
• Unchanging theories
• Spiritual inspiration
• Personal authority of a guru

• 2nd Epistemology of Chiropractic:
• “Rationalism”
• 2nd Epistemology of Chiropractic: • Meaning what?
• Theories and methods are considered authoritative if they are derived from or are consistent with basic scientific knowledge 

• 3rd Epistemology of Chiropractic:
• “Private or uncritical empiricism”
• 3rd Epistemology of Chiropractic: • Based on what?
• Validation of clinical methods and theories which come from informal/uncontrolled/unpublished personal experience and clinical lore

• 4th Epistemology of Chiropractic:
• “Clinical Science”
• 4th Epistemology of Chiropractic: • Based on what?
• Clinical knowledge/methods which are suggested by basic science/private experience but are put to the test of experimentation and testing

• Stages of learning:
• Unconscious Incompetence
Don’t know how much you don’t know
• Conscious Incompetence 
Know how much you don’t know
• Conscious Competence
Aware that you can do it
• Unconscious Competence
Don’t even have to think about it anymore


• If Socrates is a man, then Socrates is mortal.
Socrates is a man.
Therefore, Socrates is mortal.
Which premise?
• Modus Ponens (affirming the antecedent)
FYI: “Socrates is a man” is the Antecedent, “Socrates is mortal” is the Consequent

• If Socrates is a god, then Socrates is immortal.
Socrates is not immortal.
Therefore, Socrates is not a god.
Which premise?
• Modus Tollens ( Denying/falsifying the consequent)

• If you have nerve interference then you have subluxation.
You have nerve interference.
Therefore, you have subluxations.
Which premise?
• Modus Ponens / Affirming the antecedent 

• If subluxations exist then you would see them on radiographs.
You don’t see subluxations on radiographs.
Therefore, subluxations do not exist. 
Which premise?
• Modus Tollens / Denying the consequent

• “All dentists are crooks, and all crooks are scumbags” is which type of Reasoning?
• Universal Categorical Syllogism 
(Deductive Reasoning) 

• “Some dentists are crooks, and all crooks are scumbags” is which type of Reasoning?
• Partial Categorical Syllogism 
(Deductive Reasoning)

• “If I study for the test, then I will get an A” is which type of Reasoning?
• Conditional Syllogism 
(Deductive Reasoning)

• “Either I will study for the test or I will go to Starbucks” is which type of Reasoning?
• Exclusive Alternative Syllogism 
(Deductive Reasoning)

• “I will go to Starbucks and I will study” is which type of Reasoning?
• Non-exclusive Alternative Syllogism 
(Deductive Reasoning)

• “If DCs are allowed to prescribe drugs the profession will be lost” is which type of Reasoning?
• Inductive Reasoning 

• The inborn physiologic process inherent to an organism / A part of Universal Intelligence within living things =
• Innate
• The core philosophical tenant of Positivistic Science was what?
• Control and dominate nature
• “That which is good is that which supports life” is a tenant of which philosophy?
• Allopathic
• According to Schopenhauer, what is the 3rd stage that all truth passes through?
• It is accepted
• Mixing philosophical premises creates internal contradiction which ultimately leads to the process of ________.
• Self destruction
• What is teleology?
• Study of evidences of design
• What is the best example given of conscious incompetence:
• Just after your first driving lesson
• Logic was described as which of the following?
• The tool of reason
• Which of the following is NOT a type of syllogism?
• Partial conditional
• Which of the following is NOT one of Keating’s 4 epistemologies of chiropractic?
• Critical empiricism
• Which of these is an example of a partial categorical syllogism?
• Some students are cheaters and all cheaters are dragged behind pick-up trucks
• Which of the following is NOT a version of Mr. Potato head displayed in lecture?
• Kiss
• Spider Man
• Darth Vader
• Optimus Prime
• The cultural chameleon refers to which of the following:
• Someone who changes who they are based on the situation
• Virtue was defined as which of the following:
• The actions you take to maintain your values
• Situational ethics only works if you have already adopted a value system that acknowledges:
• A higher good
• If no ____ exists, then no ___ are possible.
• Alternative, values
• Definition of ethics:
• The study of moral standards 

• Ethics is the branch of philosophy that deals with ___________.
• Morality

• Ethics is concerned with which things?
• Distinguishing between:
• good and evil
• right and wrong actions
• virtuous/non-virtuous characteristics
• Definition of VALUES:
• 1) That which one acts to gain or keep – our working definition
2) Any object or quality desirable as a means or as an end in itself

• Values are determined by your:
• Moral code – which often vary from person to person

• Who has a moral code?
• Everyone 

• Are we born with an automatic set of values?
• No – taught them

• If no alternatives exist, _______________________.
• No values are possible.

• Definition of VIRTUE:
• The act by which one gains and keeps values - working definition
Moral excellence and righteousness; goodness
An example or kind of moral excellence: the virtue of patience 

Practical Application: If you believe that the subluxation exists (metaphysics) and that there is evidence to support that belief (epistemology) what are you willing to do (ethics) to get the message to a world that needs it.
• Moral Relativism:
• My right and wrong, vs. Your right and wrong 
Compromise = no one is happy / no one gets their way
Post modern cultural ideal

• What is the only reason that some people can function in a state of moral relativism, according to Browning?
• Because most of society does not

• The Cultural Chameleon:
• Influenced by their surroundings (environment / people) rather than being the influence on their surroundings
• ex: changing the atmosphere in your office – be authentic!

• Good and Evil:
• Does it really exist? – Some people reject it
Cultural “norms” exist
How do I contribute to the good?

• Who has a moral code?
• Everyone 

• Tolerance vs. Acceptance:
• We’re expected to be tolerant, but tolerance is not the same as acceptance of the act

• Are we born with an automatic set of values?
• No – taught them

• Situational Ethics
• Is what?
• Ethical decisions made in light of situation at hand
• If no alternatives exist, _______________________.
• No values are possible.

• Definition of VIRTUE:
• The act by which one gains and keeps values - working definition
Moral excellence and righteousness; goodness
An example or kind of moral excellence: the virtue of patience 

Practical Application: If you believe that the subluxation exists (metaphysics) and that there is evidence to support that belief (epistemology) what are you willing to do (ethics) to get the message to a world that needs it.
• Moral Relativism:
• My right and wrong, vs. Your right and wrong 
Compromise = no one is happy / no one gets their way
Post modern cultural ideal

• What is the only reason that some people can function in a state of moral relativism, according to Browning?
• Because most of society does not

• The Cultural Chameleon:
• Influenced by their surroundings (environment / people) rather than being the influence on their surroundings
• ex: changing the atmosphere in your office – be authentic!

• Good and Evil:
• Does it really exist? – Some people reject it
Cultural “norms” exist
How do I contribute to the good?

• Tolerance vs. Acceptance:
• We’re expected to be tolerant, but tolerance is not the same as acceptance of the act

• Situational Ethics
• Is what?
• Ethical decisions made in light of situation at hand
• Situational Ethics

• Is often misapplied as:
• Moral relativism

• In order for Situational Ethics to work, what must be done?
• Must adopt a moral code that acknowledges a “higher good” or at least a tiered value system

• Ex: Value human lives more than animal lives (swerve to not hit animal in road and get badly injured in accident)

• Ethics in LAW:
• Problem with law:
• Does “legal” = “right”?
• Does “illegal” = “wrong”?
• Who decides what the laws are and what they’re based upon?
• VALUES, common ground/beliefs, greater good [hopefully]
But… What about slavery? 
Who’s responsibility is it…? People just leave it up to others
• Fundamental assumptions when a law is legislated:
• It’s for the good, etc. 

• According to Ayn Rand, “In order for nature to be commanded, it __________________”
• Must be obeyed 
In order to lead or command it, you have to understand it!

• Contradictions in Ethics:
• Some choose self-destructive lives / self-destructive moral codes
• Many live their lives without ever addressing their contradictions

• Contradictory values ____________________
• Confused ethics 
But what are the consequences…?

• Most of the contradictions in our lives = __________ in our lives
• Destruction 

Responsibility:
• Involves what?
• Implication of _____________________
• Knowing
• Adopting “questionable” moral codes: (From Nuremberg Trials)
• “I was merely following orders…”
• “I was only obeying the law…”
• “I’m just doing what I was told…”
• “I didn’t know that was plagerism…”
• “Everyone else is doing it…”


• The assumption that someone or something knows more than I can know implies what?
• That I’m not responsible 
Ex: McD’s coffee trial 

• When Production exceeds Consumption (Producing > Consuming), a _______ effect is seen.
• Positive

• When Consumption exceeds Production (Consuming > Producing), a _____ effect is seen.
• Negative

• Giving services away creates what in our patients?
• Negative effect / attitude 

• The idea/practice that you must do everything you can to provide care to everyone:
• Selfless Server Ethics 
Things like changing fees for each patient so they can afford it, etc.

• What is the contradiction of Selfless-Server Ethics?
• You can’t be “selfless” and make a profit 
motivation for personal gain is in direct conflict with the ideal.

• The “Martyr Complex” / “Selfless Server” ethics is a ________________________ behavior.
• Self-destructive 
If you’re not around to serve anybody (bc you went broke), what’s the point…?

• An alternative to the “Selfless Server” is the __________ principle.
• Fair Exchange 

• Fair Exchange Principle entails what?
• Fair exchange of goods/services via barter, money, etc. 
Trading chiropractic care with a patient in exchange for their car repair services, etc.

• According to the Fair Exchange Principle, the “guilt of acquiring wealth/success” is an affliction that is ______________.
• Easily remedied 

• The core philosophical tenant of Positivistic Science was what?
• Control and dominate nature
• “That which is good is that which supports life” is a tenant of which philosophy?
• Allopathic

• According to Schopenhauer, what is the 3rd stage that all truth passes through?
• It is accepted 

• Mixing philosophical premises creates internal contradiction which ultimately leads to the process of ________.
• Self destruction

• What is teleology?
• Study of evidences of design
• What is the best example given of conscious incompetence:
• Just after your first driving lesson
• Logic was described as which of the following?
• The tool of reason
• Which of the following is NOT a type of syllogism?
• Partial conditional

• Which of the following is NOT one of Keating’s 4 epistemologies of chiropractic?
• Critical empiricism
• Which of these is an example of a partial categorical syllogism?
• Some students are cheaters and all cheaters are dragged behind pick-up trucks
• Virtue was defined as which of the following:
• The actions you take to maintain your values

• Situational ethics only works if you have already adopted a value system that acknowledges:
• A higher good
• If no ____ exists, then no ___ are possible.
• Alternative, values
• What is the government’s job in a Capitalist model?
• Protect individual rights
• Ultimately the selfless server ethic is ____.
• A self destructive process
• The scandal involving the East German women’s swim team occurred in which year?
• 1976
• The morality of a socialist system is ____.
• Self sacrifice
• To support any organization/person, you must have what?
• An understanding of their political views and their basis for them

• What are the 2 primary poles of Politics?
• Socialism and Capitalism

• According to Margaret Thatcher, Socialism is the gospel of ______.
• Envy 

Capitalism:
• Is what?
• Economic and political system
• Characterized by a free market for goods and services, and private control of production and consumption
• Production/Distribution/Exchange of wealth maintained by whom?
• Private individuals or corporations
• Individual rights based on what?
• Constitution / “Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness”
• Government’s job:
• Protect the rights of the individuals 

• What things are considered “Individual Rights” in Capitalism?
• Property (land)
• Intellectualism (ideas)
• Freedom 

Socialism:
• Is what?
• Economic and political system
• Production/Distribution of goods owned collectively or by a centralized government
• Government often plans and controls the economy

• What things are considered “Individual Rights” in Socialism?
• There are no INDIVIDUAL rights in Socialsim

• Socialism is considered “The _______________ of humanity.”
• Mortgage 

• East German Women’s swim team scandal • When:
• 1976
• East German Women’s swim team scandal: • Where:
• Summer Olympics in Montreal
• East German Women’s swim team scandal: What
• Women on the team were all massive and ended up winning 11 of the 13 Gold Medals
• Couldn’t (at the time) uncover the scandal behind it
• East German Women’s swim team scandal: • Scandal was exposed when?
• 1993

• In Socialism, what is considered “morality”?
• Self-sacrifice 

• In Capitalism, what is considered “morality”?
• Self-interest 

• Socialism is a form of _______.
• Statism 

• Statism:
• The principle/policy of concentrating on extensive economic, political, and related controls in the state, at the cost of individual liberty
• Statism: • Seen in which political types?
• Socialism
• Communism
• Fascism
• Collectivism
Statism • What does the State control?
• All or a majority of the: production, economy, infrastructure, etc.
Statism • What are individuals “lead” to do:
• “Make” sacrifices – have to sacrifice against their will / told what to sacrifice

Statism• What are individuals “lead” to do:
• “Make” sacrifices – have to sacrifice against their will / told what to sacrifice

• Major premise of Capitalism is that __________________________________________.
• Mankind needs to be free
Willingly produce for the greater good of society 

• According to Vancouver-based Fraser Institute (July 2004), what are the problems seen in Socialized Medicine?
• “Bleeding citizens’ hard-earned tax dollars”
• “Canada currently spends the most, yet ranks among the lowest on such indicators as:
• Access to physicians
• Quality of medical equipment
• Key health outcomes.”

• An inevitable ________ will be seen in Socializing Health Care.
• Collapse
• According to Albert Einstein, “You can’t resolve problems with ____________________.”
• The same level of thinking that existed when the problems were created

• What is a national epidemic in Western Allopathic Medicine?
• State medical emergencies 

• Problems with the current political system:
• Erosion of SOCIETY
• Lots of regulatory agencies/bureaus are being setup to “protect the PUBLIC,” but what about protecting the INDIVIDUAL?
• Can the GOVERNMENT create a moral society? 

• When you accept a professional license, you are ________________ and _____________.
• Under the jurisdiction of the state
• A regulated professional 

• Quote about politics from Nathaniel Brandon (self-esteem movement):
• “No one is coming”
• What is Aesthetics?
• Your unique expression of self
• Your message, technique, etc. 

• Influential movies that reflect the Aesthetics of culture:
• Star Wars (IV and VI)
• Star Trek (2009 version)
• Ironman
• Avatar
• Matrix (I)
Consider the following about these movies:
How is mankind presented?
What values are presented?
What is the view of mankind that is expressed?

• What was seen in Hollywood/movies in the 1960’s?
• A shift to supporting the “Anti-Hero”
Movies that follow the criminals’ story
• Examples:
• Clint Eastwood movies – “The Spaghetti Westerns”
• Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
• Oceans 11
• Italian Job

• What change was seen in TV?
• Change in COMPLEXITY:
• Unfinished story – have to wait until next episode to find out what happens
• Sub-plots
• Unresolved questions
• Examples:
• Lost, CSI, Heroes, Fast Forward

• What should be considered about the popularity of certain types of TV programming?
• What it may suggest 
What we’re more and more “okay” with seeing on the TV now vs. in the past

• Gaming Systems / Computer Games:
• Contribution to Aesthetics:
• Gives us a virtual reality (Facebook, etc.)
• Re-make ourselves (avatars)
• Gaming Systems / Computer Games:

• Types of gaming experiences:
• Strategy
• 1st person shooters
• MMORPGs (Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games):
• World of Warcraft
• Warhammer
• Lord of the Rings
• Everquest
• Runescape
• Maplestory
• Online team-play:
• Call of Duty, etc. 

• What questions can we ask ourselves, as chiropractors, to apply these cultural changes to our practice?
• How do we effectively network?
• How are people wired for reward?
• How do we engage this culture?

• What example was give about being a Purpose-Driven Chiropractor? Why?
• Having a “Deep V Hull”
• Boats with a “deep V hull” are more able to “glide” through rough waters. 
We need to have a deep foundation / have a purpose guiding us so that when we face storms, we can handle them and not lose our way.

• How does the “Emperor’s New Clothes” story relate to our current culture?
• INVERSE interpretation – we’re getting the best things before we can afford them

• If you want to be a chiropractor someday, what should you do?
• ACT like one

• In the example of Peter Pan & the Lost Boys, what did Wendy have that they “needed”?
• Stories
In the example of Peter Pan & the Lost Boys, what did Wendy have that they “needed”?
• Stories
• What is the significance of this example in today’s culture?
• The cultural loss of the meta-narrative 

• What is important for chiropractors to be aware of when it comes to their art?
• Be consistent – Your practice should reflect yourself and what you believe
• Be careful of contradictions – Do you practice what you preach? 

• Significance of April 15th , 1912:
• Day the Titanic sunk
• It’s the LITTLE things that bring us down
RIVETS are what sunk the Titanic… 

• “As a man ____________, so is he.”
• Thinks in his heart 

• Which 4 things tend to guide our decisions/who we are?
• CULTURE – “Everyone’s doing it…”
• TRADITION – “We’ve always done it this way…”
• EMOTION – “It just feels right…”
• REASON – “It seems logical…”
These are all copouts. Choose what defines YOU.