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39 Cards in this Set

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Weather
the state of the atmosphere with respect to heat or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness
2 : state or vicissitude of life or fortune
3 : disagreeable atmospheric conditions: as a : RAIN, STORM b : cold air with dampness Condition of the atmosphere at a paticular time and place.
Water Cycle
Precipitation, evaporation, and transpiration are all terms that sound familiar, yet may not mean much to you. They are all part of the water cycle, a complex process that not only gives us water to drink, fish to eat, but also weather patterns that help grow our crops. Continuous movement of water from water sources.
Humidity
: a moderate degree of wetness especially of the atmosphere -- the amount of water vapor in the air.
Relitive Humidity
the ratio of the amount of water vapor actually present in the air to the greatest amount possible at the same temperature it is measured with a pschrometer.
Condensation
1 : the act or process of condensing : as a : a chemical reaction involving union between molecules often with elimination of a simple molecule (as water) to form a new more complex compound of often greater molecular weight b : the conversion of a substance (as water) from the vapor state to a denser liquid or solid state usually initiated by a reduction in temperature of the vapor c : compression of a written or spoken work into more concise form This occurs on the outside of a glass.
Dew point
The air around a glass filled with ice water made the air around it cool to its DEW POINT creating condensation. Another example of it is dew. The temp.to which air must cool to be completely saturated.
Cloud
Cumulus Clouds, Status Clouds, and, Cirrus Cloudsb are typed of cloudsl. 1 : a visible mass of particles of condensed vapor (as water or ice) suspended in the atmosphere of a planet (as the earth) or moon
Precipitation
Rain, snow, sleet, and hail are examples of precipitation. wate vapor has to become 100 x its size to be heavy enough to fall. water in solid or liquid form.
air mass
An air mass is a large body of air that has similar temperature and moisture properties throughout. Fronts push this thing.
Front
In meteorology, a weather front is a boundary between two air masses with differing characteristics (e.g., air temperature or humidity).

When a weather front passes over an area, it is marked by changes in temperature, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, and often a change in the precipitation pattern.

Cold front Warm front Stationary front Occluded fronts
Primary Pollutants
Primary pollutants are substances directly produced by a process, such as ash from a volcanic eruption or the carbon monoxide gas from a motor vehicle exhaust. injected into the atmosphere directly..... examples include:

carbon monoxide (CO)
odorless, colorless, poisonous gas
created by incomplete combustion (especially bad with older cars)
generates headaches, drowsiness, fatigue, can result in death
oxides of nitrogen (NOx, NO)
NO - nitric oxide
emitted directly by autos, industry
sulfur oxides (SOx)
SO2 - sulfur dioxide
produced largely through coal burning
responsible for acid rain problem
volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
highly reactive organic compounds
release through incomplete combustion and industrial sources
particulate matter (dust, ash, salt particles)
bad for your lungs
Secondary Pollutants
Secondary pollutants are not emitted. Rather, they form in the air when primary pollutants react or interact. An important example of a secondary pollutant is ozone—one of the many secondary pollutants that make up photochemical smog. form in the atmosphere through chemical and photochemical reactions from the primary pollutants
examples include:
sulfuric acid H2SO4
can cause respiratory problems
nitrogen dioxide NO2
gives air a brownish coloration

ozone O3
colorless gas
has a sweet smell
is an oxidizing agent - lung tissue to rubber products
irritates the eyes
Acid Precipitation
Acidic pollutants can be deposited from the atmosphere to the Earth's surface in wet and dry forms. The term is used to specifically describe wet forms of acid pollution that can be found in rain, sleet, snow, fog, and cloud vapor.
Thunderstorm
thunderstorm, or an electrical storm, is a form of weather characterized by the presence of lightning and its attendant thunder. It is usually accompanied by copious rainfall, hail, or, on occasion, snowfall in the winter months (which is sometimes known as thundersnow).
Thunderstorms form when significant condensation, resulting in the production of a wide range of water droplets and ice crystals, occurs in an atmosphere that is unstable and supports deep, rapid upward motion. This often occurs in the presence of three conditions: sufficient moisture accumulated in the lower atmosphere, reflected by high dewpoint temperatures; a significant fall in air temperature with increasing height, known as a steep lapse rate; and a force such as mechanical convergence along a cold front that will focus the lift.
Lightning
Lightning is a powerful natural electrostatic discharge produced during a thunderstorm. Lightning's abrupt electric discharge is accompanied by the emission of visible light and other forms of electromagnetic radiation. The electric current passing through the discharge channels rapidly heats and expands the air into a plasma, producing acoustic shock waves (thunder) in the atmosphere.
Weather
the state of the atmosphere with respect to heat or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness
2 : state or vicissitude of life or fortune
3 : disagreeable atmospheric conditions: as a : RAIN, STORM b : cold air with dampness Condition of the atmosphere at a paticular time and place.
Water Cycle
Precipitation, evaporation, and transpiration are all terms that sound familiar, yet may not mean much to you. They are all part of the water cycle, a complex process that not only gives us water to drink, fish to eat, but also weather patterns that help grow our crops. Continuous movement of water from water sources.
Humidity
: a moderate degree of wetness especially of the atmosphere -- the amount of water vapor in the air.
Relitive Humidity
the ratio of the amount of water vapor actually present in the air to the greatest amount possible at the same temperature it is measured with a pschrometer.
Condensation
1 : the act or process of condensing : as a : a chemical reaction involving union between molecules often with elimination of a simple molecule (as water) to form a new more complex compound of often greater molecular weight b : the conversion of a substance (as water) from the vapor state to a denser liquid or solid state usually initiated by a reduction in temperature of the vapor c : compression of a written or spoken work into more concise form This occurs on the outside of a glass.
Dew point
The air around a glass filled with ice water made the air around it cool to its DEW POINT creating condensation. Another example of it is dew. The temp.to which air must cool to be completely saturated.
Cloud
Cumulus Clouds, Status Clouds, and, Cirrus Cloudsb are typed of cloudsl. 1 : a visible mass of particles of condensed vapor (as water or ice) suspended in the atmosphere of a planet (as the earth) or moon
Precipitation
Rain, snow, sleet, and hail are examples of precipitation. wate vapor has to become 100 x its size to be heavy enough to fall. water in solid or liquid form.
air mass
An air mass is a large body of air that has similar temperature and moisture properties throughout. Fronts push this thing.
Front
In meteorology, a weather front is a boundary between two air masses with differing characteristics (e.g., air temperature or humidity).

When a weather front passes over an area, it is marked by changes in temperature, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, and often a change in the precipitation pattern.

Cold front Warm front Stationary front Occluded fronts
Primary Pollutants
Primary pollutants are substances directly produced by a process, such as ash from a volcanic eruption or the carbon monoxide gas from a motor vehicle exhaust. injected into the atmosphere directly..... examples include:

carbon monoxide (CO)
odorless, colorless, poisonous gas
created by incomplete combustion (especially bad with older cars)
generates headaches, drowsiness, fatigue, can result in death
oxides of nitrogen (NOx, NO)
NO - nitric oxide
emitted directly by autos, industry
sulfur oxides (SOx)
SO2 - sulfur dioxide
produced largely through coal burning
responsible for acid rain problem
volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
highly reactive organic compounds
release through incomplete combustion and industrial sources
particulate matter (dust, ash, salt particles)
bad for your lungs
Secondary Pollutants
Secondary pollutants are not emitted. Rather, they form in the air when primary pollutants react or interact. An important example of a secondary pollutant is ozone—one of the many secondary pollutants that make up photochemical smog. form in the atmosphere through chemical and photochemical reactions from the primary pollutants
examples include:
sulfuric acid H2SO4
can cause respiratory problems
nitrogen dioxide NO2
gives air a brownish coloration

ozone O3
colorless gas
has a sweet smell
is an oxidizing agent - lung tissue to rubber products
irritates the eyes
Acid Precipitation
Acidic pollutants can be deposited from the atmosphere to the Earth's surface in wet and dry forms. The term is used to specifically describe wet forms of acid pollution that can be found in rain, sleet, snow, fog, and cloud vapor.
Thunderstorm
thunderstorm, or an electrical storm, is a form of weather characterized by the presence of lightning and its attendant thunder. It is usually accompanied by copious rainfall, hail, or, on occasion, snowfall in the winter months (which is sometimes known as thundersnow).
Thunderstorms form when significant condensation, resulting in the production of a wide range of water droplets and ice crystals, occurs in an atmosphere that is unstable and supports deep, rapid upward motion. This often occurs in the presence of three conditions: sufficient moisture accumulated in the lower atmosphere, reflected by high dewpoint temperatures; a significant fall in air temperature with increasing height, known as a steep lapse rate; and a force such as mechanical convergence along a cold front that will focus the lift.
Lightning
Lightning is a powerful natural electrostatic discharge produced during a thunderstorm. Lightning's abrupt electric discharge is accompanied by the emission of visible light and other forms of electromagnetic radiation. The electric current passing through the discharge channels rapidly heats and expands the air into a plasma, producing acoustic shock waves (thunder) in the atmosphere.
Thunder
Thunder is the sound of the shockwave caused when lightning instantly heats the air around it to up to 30 000 °C (54 000 °F). That super-heated air expands rapidly, then contracts as it cools. The rapid expansion/contraction generates sound waves, making the sound that is called "thunder."

Because sound and light travel at different speeds through the atmosphere, one can time the interval between them to roughly estimate how far away the bolt of lightning is. The speed of sound in air is approximately 340 m/s (761 mph), while the speed of light is so fast that the lightning is seen only a few microseconds after the event, so the lightning is approximately one kilometer distant for every 3 second interval (one mile for every 5 seconds).
Tornado
A tornado is a violent windstorm characterized by a twisting, funnel-shaped cloud. The word "tornado" comes from the Spanish verb tornar, meaning "to turn." Tornadoes form in storms all around the world, and though they have been recorded in all 50 U.S states, they form most famously in a broad area of the American Midwest and South known as Tornado Alley. Although, in pure number of incidences, the United States experiences more tornadoes than any other country, the United Kingdom is the most tornado-prone country relative to land area. Some common, related slang terms are: twister, whirlwind, wedge, funnel, gustnado, landspout, willy-willy, or rope. Cyclone is also another term for a tornado, although it must be noted that in parts of the world (notably Australia) a Cyclone refers to what is more correctly known as a Tropical Cyclone (also known as a Hurricane, or a Typhoon), and for this reason, the use of the term Cyclone on its own should be avoided when describing a Tornado to avoid confusion (see Cyclones
Hurricane
In meteorology, a tropical cyclone (or tropical disturbance, tropical depression, tropical storm, typhoon, or hurricane, depending on strength and geographical context) is a type of low pressure system which generally forms in the tropics. While they can be highly destructive, tropical cyclones are an important part of the atmospheric circulation system, which moves heat from the equatorial region toward the higher latitudes
Thermometer
A tool used to measure air temp. it measues in both Delsius and Ferenheight.
Barometer
It is used to measeure air presure.
A barometer is commonly used for weather prediction, as high air pressure in a region indicates fair weather while low pressure indicates that storms are more likely. Localized high atmospheric pressure acts as a barrier to approaching weather systems, diverting their course. Low atmospheric pressure, on the other hand, represents the path of least resistance for a weather system, making it more likely that low pressure will be associated with increased storm activity.

The density of mercury will change with temperature, so a reading must be adjusted for the temperature of the instrument. For this purpose a mercury thermometer is usually mounted on the instrument. No such compensation is required for an aneroid barometer.
Windstock
A conr shaped peice of weather proof material that indacates wind direction.
Wind Vane
Its shaped like an arrow, with a large tail and is attached to a pole.
Anemometer
It measueres Wind speed. 4 cups on a pole.
Isobars
lines that connect points of equal air presurre rather than equal elevation. Looks like contour lines.