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77 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
What is a presynaptic neuron?
conducts impulses toward the synapse
NAME
conducts impulses toward the synapse
presynaptic neuron
What is a postsynaptic neuron?
transmits impulses away from the synapse
NAME
transmits impulses away from the syanpse
postsynaptic neuron
What is the differ btwn the from presynaptic neuron and postsynaptic neuron?
(1)presynaptic neuron-conducts impulses toward the synapse (2)postsynapctic neuron-transmits impulses away from the syanpse
What are two main types of synapses?
(1)axodentric (2)axosomatic
NAME
exs include axodentric, axosomatic, axoaxonic, dendrodendritic, and dendrosomatic
synapses
What are axodentric?
are synapses btwn axon of one neuron and the denddrite of another
NAME
are synapes btwn axon of one neuron and the dendrite of another
axodentric
What are axosomatic?
are synapses btwn the axon of one neuron and the soma of another
NAME
are synapses btwn the axon of one neuron and the some of another
axosomatic
What are axoaxonic?
synapses from axon to axon
NAME
synapses from axon to axon
axoaxonic
What are dendrodentric?
are synapses from dendrite to dendrite
NAME
are synapses from dendrite to dendrite
dendrodendritic
What are dendrsomatic?
synapses from dendrites to soma
NAME
are synapses from dendrites to soma
dendrosomatic
Which is more common, eletrical impulses or chemical impulses?
eletrical impulses
NAME
these are the most common impulses
eletrical
NAME
correspond to gap junctions found in other cell types
eletrical syanpses
Eltrical syanpses correspond to (1) found in other cell types
eletrical synapses
How are eletrical synapses important to the CNS? (4)
(1)arousal from sleep (2)mental attention (2)emotions and memory (3)ion and water homoeostasis
NAME
are important in the CNS for arousal from sleep, mental attention, emotions and memory, and ion and water homeostasis
eletrical syanpses
What are chemical synapses?
are speacilized for the release and reception of neurotransmitters
NAME
are speacilized for the release and reception of neurotransmitters
chemical synapses
What are the two parts of chemical synapses?
(1)axonal terminal of the presynaptic neurons (2)receptor region on the denrites of soma of the postsynaptic neuron
NAME
its two parts are the axonal terminal of the presynaptic neurons and the receptor region on the denrites of soma of the postsynaptic neuron
chemical synapses
NAME
contain synaptic vesicles
axonal terminal of the presynaptic neuron
Axonal terminal of the presynaptic neuron contain (1)
synaptic vesicles
What is the synaptic cleft?
is a fluid filled space separating the presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons
NAME
is a fluid space separating the presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons
synaptic cleft
Synaptic cleft prevent (1)
nerve impulses from directly passing from one neuron to the enxt
NAME
prevents nerve impulses from directly passing from one neuron to the next
synaptic cleft
Transmissions across the synaptic cleft are (1)
chemical event and ensures unidirectional communication btwn neurons
NAME
is a chemical event and ensures unidirectional communication btwn neurons
transmissions across the synaptic clefts
(1) reach the axonal terminal of the presynaptic neuron and open Ca channels
nerve impulses
What happens once nerve impulses reach the axonal terminal of the presynaptic neuron?
open Na channels
Once nerve impulses reach (1)and open Ca 2+ channels
the axonal terminal of the presynaptic neuron
Neurontranmitter is released into the (1) via (2) in response to synaptotagmin
synaptic cleft (2)exoctocysis
(1) is realeased into the synaptic cleft exoctyosis in repsonse to synaptotgamin
neurotransmitter
Neurotransmitters cross the syanptic cleft and binds to (1)
receptors on the postsynaptic neuron
(1) changes causing an exictary or inhibitory effect
postsynaptic membrane permeability
Postsynaptic membrane permeability changes causing an (1)
an exicitary or inhibitory efffect
How is info transfered across the synaptic cleft? (4)
(1)nerve impulses reach the axonal terminal of the presynaptic neuron and open Ca2+ channels (2)neurotransmitters is released into the synaptic cleft via excotytosis in response to synaptogmin (3)neurotransmitter crosses the snyaptic cleft and binds to receptors on the postsynaptic neurons (4)postsynaptic membrane permeability changes causing an exictory effect
What happens when a neurotransmitter is bound to a postsynaptic neuron? (3)
(1)produce a continous postsynaptic effect (2)blocks reception of additional "messages" (3)must be removed from its receptors
NAME
produces a continous postsynaptic effect
neurotransmitter bound to a postsynaptic neuron
NAME
block a reception of additional "messages"
neurotransmitter bound to a postsynaptic neuron
NAME
must be removed from its receptor
neurotransmitter bound to a postsynaptic neuron
When does the removal of a neurotransmitter ocur? (3)
if they are (1)degraded by an enzyme (2)are reabsorbed by asctrocytes or the presynaptic terminals (3)diffuse from the synaptic cleft
If a neurotransmitter is degradd by an eznyme, it has been (1)
removed
if a neurotransmitter is reabsorbed by astrocytes or presynaptic terminals, it has been (1)
removed
if a neurotransmitter diffuses from the synaptic cleft, then it has been (1)
removed
What is synaptic delay?
is the rate limiting step of neural transmission
NAME
is the rate limiting step of neural transmission
synaptic delay
Neurotransmitters must be (1), (2), and (3)
be realased, diffuse across the synapse, and bind to receptors
How do neurotransmitter receptors mediate changes in membrane potenital? (2)
(1)the amount of neurotransmitter released (2)the amount of time the neurotransmitter is bound to the receptors
What are two types of postsynaptic potenitals?
(1)EPSP (2)IPSP
What does EPSP stand for?
excitary postsynaptic potentials
What does IPSP stand for?
inhibitory postsynaptic potenitals
NAME
there are two types EPSP, and IPSP
postsynaptic potenitals
What are ESPS?
are graded potentials that can iniate an action potenital in an axon
NAME
are graded potenitals that can iniate an action potenitals an axon
EPSPs
NAME
use only chemically gated channels
EPSP
NAME
Na and K flow in oppostie directions at the same time
EPSP
For EPSP, Na and K flow in (1)
opposite directions
EPSP use only (1)
chemcially gated channels
Do postsynaptic membranes generate action potenitals?
no
T or F
postsynaptic membranes do generate action potentials
false
What can happen when a neurotransmitter binds to a receptor at inhibitory synapses? (3)
(1)causes the membrane to become more pemeable to K and Cl ions (2)leaves the charge of the inner surface negative (3)reduces the postsynaptic neuron's ability to produce an action potenital
NAME
causes the membrane to become more permeable to K and Cl ions
the binding of a neurotransmitter to a receptor at inhibitoy synapses
NAME
leaves a charge on the inner surface negative
the binding of a neurotransmitter to a receptor at inhibitoy synapses
NAME
reduces the postsynaptic neuron's ability to produce an action potenital
the binding of a neurotransmitter to a receptor at inhibitoy synapses
can a single EPSP induce an action potenital?
no
T or F
a single EPSP can induce a action potenital
false
How must EPSP's generate action potenital?
must summate temporally or spatially
What is temporal summation?
presynaptic neurons transmit impulses in a rapid fire order
NAME
is when presynaptic neurons transmit impulses in a rapid fire order
temporal summation