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45 Cards in this Set

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The influences that account for the initiation, direction, intensity, and persistence of behavior.
Motivation
A reason or purpose for behavior.
Motive
Automatic, involuntary, and unlearned behavior patterns that are consistently displayed in the presence of specific stimuli.
Instincts
A theory that proposed that human behavior is caused by instincts.
Instinct theory
The tendency of an organism to maintain its physiological system at a stable, steady level, by constantly adjusting to changes in internal or external stimuli.
Homeostasis
State sthat biological needs, whcih are created by imbalances in homeostasis, produce drivese.
Drive reduction theory
A biological requirement for well-being.
Need
A psychological state of arousal that compels us to take action to restore out homeostatic balance.
Drive
Drives that arise from biological needs.
Primary drives
Are learned through operant or classical conditioning.
Secondary drives
A general internal level of activation reflected in the state of several physiological systems.
Arousal
State that people are motivated to behave in ways that maintain an optimal level of arousal.
Arousal theories
States that human behavior is goal directed; we act to obtain positive stimuli and avoid negative stimuli.
Incentive theory
Is the state of watning to eat.
Hunger
Is the state of no longer wanting to eat.
Satiety
Is a condition of severe overweight and can contribute to diabetes, high blood pressure, and increased risk of heart attack.
Obesity
Is an eating disorder characterized by an obsession with eating and self-starvation, sometimes to the point of death.
Anorexia nervosa
Is an eating disorder in which a person consumes large quantities of good and then attempts to eliminte the food through vomiting.
Bulimia nervosa
A pattern of arousal during and after secual activity.
Sexual response cycle
Influence our motivation to participate in secual activity.
Sex hormones
Female hormones.
Estrogens
Female hormones.
Progestins
Male hormones.
Androgens
Activity is sexual interaction with people of opposite sex.
Heterosexual
Activity is sexual interaction with people of same sex.
Homosexual
Activity is secual interaction with people of both sexes.
Bisexual
Are conditions in which a person's ability or desire to have sex is diminshed or gone.
Sexual dysfunction
Is either a positive or a negative experience that is felt with some intensity as happening to the self, is generated in part by a cognitive appraisal of sitations, and is accompanied by both and learned and unlearned responses.
Emotion
A subdivision of the autonomic nervous system, is involved in activities relating to the growth and nourishment of the body.
Parasympathetic system
Is reflected in the degree to which people establish specific goals, care about meeting those goals, and experience feelings of satisfaction in doing so.
Need achievement
The influences that account for the initiation, direction, intensity, and persistence of behavior.
Motivation
A reason or purpose for behavior.
Motive
Automatic, involuntary, and unlearned behavior patterns that are consistently displayed in the presence of specific stimuli.
Instincts
A theory that proposed that human behavior is caused by instincts.
Instinct theory
The tendency of an organism to maintain its physiological system at a stable, steady level, by constantly adjusting to changes in internal or external stimuli.
Homeostasis
State sthat biological needs, whcih are created by imbalances in homeostasis, produce drivese.
Drive reduction theory
A biological requirement for well-being.
Need
A psychological state of arousal that compels us to take action to restore out homeostatic balance.
Drive
Drives that arise from biological needs.
Primary drives
Are learned through operant or classical conditioning.
Secondary drives
A general internal level of activation reflected in the state of several physiological systems.
Arousal
State that people are motivated to behave in ways that maintain an optimal level of arousal.
Arousal theories
States that human behavior is goal directed; we act to obtain positive stimuli and avoid negative stimuli.
Incentive theory
Is the state of watning to eat.
Hunger
Is the state of no longer wanting to eat.
Satiety