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7 Cards in this Set

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So how do we place organs into these cavities and have them stay in place? Even trickier, how to we place an organ that is always moving, say the heart or the lungs or even your intestines, into one of these hollow cavities and keep it in place without firmly attaching it to the inside walls of the cavity since the organ needs to be able to move freely? Let's start with the heart as an example
Yet the other side of the balloon is not touching my 'fist/heart', but is separated from it by the air in the balloon. Assume that the balloon is stick on the outside so that when I push my 'fist/heart' up against it farther and farther, the balloon sticks to my 'fist/heart'. If I hold the other side of the balloon with my other hand, my 'fist/heart' will not fall to the ground since it is stuck to the sticky surface of the balloon (remember, my 'fist/heart' is not suppost to be attached at the wrist). So now all I need to do is place this side of the balloon that is not in contact with the 'fist/heart' up inside my ribs and it will also stick. I've done it. My heart is free to beat and move, yet it won't fall down or wiggle loose since the other side of the balloon is attached to the insides of my ribs. Why this works so well is that it is just one single balloon. But one single balloon with two surfaces. One surface attached to the 'fist/heart' and the other surface attached to the insides of my ribs. This balloon is called the pericardium.
pericardium
The pericardium has both the visceral portion and the parietal portion, but it is still one continuous balloon, one continuous membrane called the pericardium.

Why this works so well is that it is just one single balloon. But one single balloon with two surfaces. One surface attached to the 'fist/heart' and the other surface attached to the insides of my ribs
pericardial fluid
fluid in the pericardium.
visceral pericaridum
The part of the pericardium that is stuck to the heart itself is called the visceral pericaridum
parietal pericardium
while the other surface of the pericardium that is attached to the insides of the ribs is called the parietal pericardium
Mucus membranes
line cavities or tubes that exit the body.
secrets thick sticky fluid (mucus)
lines digestive tract, respiratory tract, reproductive tract, inner surface of eyelids
Serous membranes line the thoracic and abdominopelvic cavities and cover viseral organs
lining of cavities that do not open to outside of body
secret watery fluids
reduce binding and friction